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Crosley tractor?


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#16 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 04:28 PM

I thought of and looked up the Anglia engine but couldn't find a good enough picture to tell for sure.  The shift tower of the tranny looked like the Anglia. 

 

???


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#17 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 04:31 PM

Does it have anything embossed on the cylinder head?

Maybe if I cleaned it up.


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#18 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 04:32 PM

The Lucas starter is a clue that this is of English origin. If you google 1951 ford anglia engine you will see a similar engine. The flat boss on the front of the cylinder head was to support the generator which mounted on top of the engine. What do you think?

I think that may be it.

 

1946-Ford-Anglia-engine.jpg


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#19 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 05:18 PM

Bingo!! That's where I was going


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#20 hamman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 05:20 PM

I was looking also but couldn't remember Anglia. Glad you are getting some info on it.                                                                                             Roger


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#21 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 05:25 PM

I was looking also but couldn't remember Anglia. Glad you are getting some info on it.                                                                                             Roger

I am thinking home brew or partially home brew.What years was this specific engine used?


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#22 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 05:31 PM

Well this tractor is a Crosley, Came from some factory they had in Texas, where it mowed the lawn. belong to a huge Crosley collector south of me. He's was collecting them before it was even a fad, and has many in magazines over the yrs so im pretty sure he know what he's talking about. Its been several yrs since I took these picture and don't remember all the details on it.

 

 

 

scan0009.jpg scan0011.jpg


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#23 hamman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 03, 2016 - 07:17 PM

The Anglia was made from 1939 to 1967. I'm not an expert but the one my brother had back in the early 60s , the motor looked a lot like that. I was 14 then and a lot of info and crap has passed thru this brain. Hope this helps.                                                                                                                              Roger


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#24 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2016 - 07:55 AM

I don't think its a crosley engine. 

The pre-war Crosleys had an opposed two cylinder Waukeshau. [sp]

Right after WW-II crosley came out with a more conventional in line 4 cylinder [tin] engine with overhead camshaft called CoBra - which stands for COpper BRAzed.   That tin engine, at a glance LOOKS the same as the later cast block overhead cam models. 

Of course the tin engines leaked water/antifreeze into the oil and was a flop. 

 

True story!!

My chiropractor,  got a job at a auto repair shop upon discharge from the service long about 1950+/-.  His fiirst job was to replace a Crosley tin engine because of water leakage.   Apparently some of those tin engines made it a few years anyhow.   He said once unbolted, 2 guys could just pick it up and set it out of the engine bay.  He still practices bone-cracking but is in his mid 80's now.

 

From what little I can see of it that transmission doesn't look like the Borg-Warner's crashbox found in Crosleys. 

VERRY,  VERRY kewell tractor!!!!!

Fix it up and enjoy it!  :thumbs:

 

I'll add a link to the CoBra engine

http://crosleyautocl...Eng_Tree-1.html

My brothers' first car was a Crosley. He was 13. He stripped the body off and used it as a woods buggy. A couple years later he got another one, fixed it up and drove it. The clutch started to slip, so he ordered a new clutch from a mail order place on Long Island. When the parts came in, we put the car in the garage, removed the hood and radiator. The two of us picked the engine up and balanced it on the radiator support. While I held it, he switched the clutch and then we put the engine back in. We were out of the garage before the old man was home from work. Those engines were cast aluminum crankcases, cast iron cylinders with integrel head and over head camshaft. Grinding the valve seats was a pain. Common engine failure was the cylinders pulling away from the cast aluminum block. This was in 1968. He got rid of all the Crosleys and the spare parts when he join the USAF to avoid the draft. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, March 04, 2016 - 07:56 AM.

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#25 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2016 - 09:24 AM

I seen an Crosley outboard boat motor at a local show several year ago.

 

Crofton Bug is another neat machine.

 

http://crosleyautocl...on/Crofton.html


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#26 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2016 - 01:41 PM

How does this transmission work with no cluster gear? I don't see any shaft or provision for a cluster gear.You can see the front gear teeth are missing and appear to have been ground off with a grinder.Wouldn't this just have 3rd direct drive and no reverse as it is? The rear does appear to have a planetary.

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  • IMG_4977.JPG


#27 jimmy G ONLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2016 - 07:47 PM

Very cool, automatic trany's use planetary's for gearing, if you lock the planetary the output spins backwards
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#28 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted March 04, 2016 - 09:26 PM

Does anyone understand the transmission in more detail for those that are confused still?

Edited by wvbuzzmaster, March 04, 2016 - 09:26 PM.

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#29 jimmy G ONLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2016 - 02:02 AM

OK here's my guess, the slip gear is in and out, the straight cut gear is shuttle, the modified part is factory done for planetary application which could also explain the lack of machining for cluster gear (if I could only get a little of that grease under my finger nail's)
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#30 Username OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2016 - 06:22 PM

The rear end really fascinates me.It's 36" wide and has planetary's with 9" hydraulic brakes.I would love to know where else one was used.The rear end also requires a torque tube which I don' have.

 

Did find what looks to be the same transmission.  http://www.ebay.com/...=STRK:MEBIDX:IT


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