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Electrical question on rectifier/regulator


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#1 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 03:25 PM

How do I test this with a meter to see if it's any good. And what amps is it, 10 or 15. No markings on it.
Thanks for any information,
Noel

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#2 DougT OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 04:22 PM

Without getting a wiring schematic and looking, I think you need to have continuity from the outside terminals to the center but not from the center to the outside. There are diodes inside that should only let the current flow one way. Red lead on outside and blk lead to center should show continuity. Swap the leads and it should show open. I'm not sure how to tell the amperage.


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#3 MiCarl ONLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 04:41 PM

Testing it has nothing to do with amperage.

 

You need to set your meter to the appropriate resistance setting for checking diodes.  Typically there will be symbol that looks similar to this: >|-.

 

With the meter set that way put the red lead on one (AC) terminal.  You should get a continuity reading from the terminal to either the case or to the (B+) terminal, but not both, one should read open.  Do the same test with the black lead on the (AC) terminal and you should get opposite results.

Do the same with the other (AC) terminal.  You should get readings that are the reverse of the first (AC) terminal.  If that's how it comes out then the rectifier is probably good.

 

There is no way I know of the check if the regulator (if it even has one) is good.  If the stator and rectifier check out and it's not charging the presumption is the regulator is bad.  Of course this is only true if all the connections are good.

 

If the charging voltage is too high it is the regulator.


Edited by MiCarl, February 22, 2016 - 04:42 PM.

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#4 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 05:11 PM

I do have a method to check a regulator, but you will need a 24VAC (2A) transformer. It is connected across the outer AC terminals. Connect a battery + to the center (B) terminal and the battery - to the case. Measure the battery with the multimeter DC setting, then plug in the transformer. You should see the voltage slowely raise to ~14VDC. The 2A transformer will only trickle charge the battery, and the regulator should remain cool.

No real way to determine the current rating of the regulator.


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#5 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 06:03 PM

I do have a method to check a regulator, but you will need a 24VAC (2A) transformer. It is connected across the outer AC terminals. Connect a battery + to the center (B) terminal and the battery - to the case. Measure the battery with the multimeter DC setting, then plug in the transformer. You should see the voltage slowely raise to ~14VDC. The 2A transformer will only trickle charge the battery, and the regulator should remain cool.

No real way to determine the current rating of the regulator.

that's a good thought Larry. I have a 24vac transformer out of a ac unit I think I will make a tester for regulators.


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#6 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 08:38 PM

I check mine when the ammeter quits working  :D

 

That's probably a 15 amp


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#7 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 08:52 PM

Here is my test jig, I can provide 14VDC to check Solenoids and switches, and 28VAC for regulators and diodes. A battery must be in parallel when testing those.

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#8 larrybl OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 08:58 PM

I picked up this beefy 13.8 VDC power supply that can supply up to 10A for 1 minuet, Haven't got to play with it yet. 

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#9 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2016 - 08:11 AM

I picked up this beefy 13.8 VDC power supply that can supply up to 10A for 1 minuet, Haven't got to play with it yet. 

that may be nice for checking electric PTO



#10 jms180 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2016 - 08:12 AM

Here is my test jig, I can provide 14VDC to check Solenoids and switches, and 28VAC for regulators and diodes. A battery must be in parallel when testing those.

nice set up I like the heat sink on the bridge rectifier



#11 MiCarl ONLINE  

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Posted February 23, 2016 - 09:27 AM

I have a little more time today and found a schematic of a bridge rectifier.  This may help you understand what you're testing.

diode-testing.gif

In the case of the one you pictured the NEG will be the case itself.

 

Those triangular symbols with the line at the point indicate diodes.  Electricity should flow through them one direction but not the other.  You can visualize them like check valves in a pipe.
 

The reason your meter needs to be set to the appropriate range is there is a minimum voltage required before the diode will conduct electricity.  The other ranges may not have sufficient voltage to "open" the diode.


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