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Need driveshaft adapter for 1855, anyone have parts???


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#1 Snapper 1855 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2011 - 09:45 AM

Does anyone out there have a drive shaft adapter for a 1855- it's part # 7049589 engine adapter. this connects the back of the motor to the driveshaft, Snapper does not make these parts anymore so I'm hoping someone out there has this, or maybe parting put a 1855. Thanks

#2 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2011 - 09:55 AM

Snapper 1855,sorry I can help you,but:welcometogttalk:glad to have you with us.

#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 28, 2011 - 10:30 AM

I don't think I've even seen that part used on ebay.

#4 TUDOR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2011 - 03:17 AM

If you have a buddy with a metal lathe you could make one.

Two parts, the first is a disc machined to fit the flywheel center and bolt holes and a center hole to accept the shaft, and the second is the splined shaft with the splines turned off for the first 5/8 " or so to an interference fit with the hub. After they are mated and back welded (on the flywheel side), a clean-up and truing pass on the lathe and some shim stock, you'll be all set.

If you have the original shaft, that's even better. Drill the shaft out of the hub and fit a new splined shaft in. A truing pass and shimming for true running is still required.

That's what I did when I changed to 1" shafting for my rear PTO. Only I used 1" shafting instead of splined. It now has about 1500 hours on it.

#5 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted May 02, 2011 - 08:47 AM

If you have a buddy with a metal lathe you could make one.

Two parts, the first is a disc machined to fit the flywheel center and bolt holes and a center hole to accept the shaft, and the second is the splined shaft with the splines turned off for the first 5/8 " or so to an interference fit with the hub. After they are mated and back welded (on the flywheel side), a clean-up and truing pass on the lathe and some shim stock, you'll be all set.

If you have the original shaft, that's even better. Drill the shaft out of the hub and fit a new splined shaft in. A truing pass and shimming for true running is still required.

That's what I did when I changed to 1" shafting for my rear PTO. Only I used 1" shafting instead of splined. It now has about 1500 hours on it.


If you can get a perfect machined hole in the adapter plate, with an interference fit of around .002" or so, pressing the new stub into the plate will surely provide a more true run. Welding could "pull" the stub sideways, but pressing in will help a ton.

#6 Snapper 1855 OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2011 - 01:34 PM

Hi, thanks for the info, I do have the old shaft it broke in the middle, the hub is still good. Would this be expensive to repair at a fabricating shop, there is one close to me, but I was afraid to stop by and ask how much. I have a few leads at 2 salvage yards in PA, but the wait is killing me. David



If you can get a perfect machined hole in the adapter plate, with an interference fit of around .002" or so, pressing the new stub into the plate will surely provide a more true run. Welding could "pull" the stub sideways, but pressing in will help a ton.



#7 TUDOR OFFLINE  

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Posted May 03, 2011 - 11:26 PM

Get the shafting first, then the machine shop if you don't have a community college that has a machine shop program. Makes a good practice piece for students, especially the ones about to graduate.

It costs nothing to ask for a price.




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