Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

different kind of a ring compressor?


  • Please log in to reply
16 replies to this topic

#1 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,439 Thanks
  • 1,896 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:07 PM

I am rebuilding my air compressor, which is basically an engine without a fuel system or ignition system, and the "exhaust" is the compressed air.  This particular compressor is much like a motorcycle engine, meaning that the rings must be compressed and the cylinder jug slid OVER the pistons. so a regular ratchet style, sleeve, ring compressor won't work, how would I get it off when I slide the cylinder down?
I have 2 different sets of the "pliers style" ring compressors, one Snap on and the other made by K-D.

These have an open slot in them so I can slide it off, once the rings are within the cylinder and before the cylinder butts up against the crank case.  Both of my pliers style ring compressors start at 2-7/8" piston diameter, but my pistons are only  2-1/2" diameter. anyone know of a source for the bands for these style ring compressors outside what comes in the kit? Snap on offers ones that are on the larger end of the range of what comes in the kit, but not smaller.


  • Bud and MFDAC have said thanks

#2 Tecumseh power ONLINE  

Tecumseh power

    Jack of all trades, master of none.

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 77571
  • 941 Thanks
  • 766 posts
  • Location: Vintondale pa

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:27 PM

When I do a motorcycle , I either hold the rings while someone slides the jug on. Or if I'm by myself I use a hose clamp
  • MH81, boyscout862, dodge trucker and 1 other said thanks

#3 gopher OFFLINE  

gopher

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2755
  • 566 Thanks
  • 629 posts

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:33 PM

Look up proform ring install tool.


  • dodge trucker said thank you

#4 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,439 Thanks
  • 1,896 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:36 PM

When I do a motorcycle , I either hold the rings while someone slides the jug on. Or if I'm by myself I use a hose clamp

well I would need 3 sets of hands, as this compressor is a V-4 and I have 2 pistons to try and squeeze the rings on while someone else slides the jug over...when doing a conventional engine, where the piston drops thru from the top side of the cylinder, I have tried to squeeze the rings with my fingers as I push the piston down and have yet to succeed, so I wouldnt think that I could do this style where the jg has to slide over, that way.  Alot of motorcycles are 2 cycle and only have 1 or 2 rings. This thing has 2 compression and an oil ring (which has an expander behind it)  just like most 4 cycle small engines and car engines do.



#5 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,439 Thanks
  • 1,896 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:45 PM

Look up proform ring install tool.

 Of what I can find from them so far, seems like same issue I have with what I already own; don't go down small enough.



#6 MiCarl ONLINE  

MiCarl
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 75926
  • 837 Thanks
  • 480 posts
  • Location: Livonia, MI

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:46 PM

On motorcycle cylinders the bottom typically has a chamfer to help the rings go in.

 

Late last fall I did pistons/rings in an in-line 4 stroke (all the bores in one casting).  No ring compressor used, but was definitely a 2 person job and it took us awhile.

 

We set the crank angle so we could get the first two in, then the other two.  Of course you have to work back and forth one ring at a time.


Edited by MiCarl, February 12, 2016 - 04:48 PM.

  • MFDAC, HDWildBill and boyscout862 have said thanks

#7 gopher OFFLINE  

gopher

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 2755
  • 566 Thanks
  • 629 posts

Posted February 12, 2016 - 04:50 PM

The one from Advance Auto  is 2.5 to 5 inch bore. KD tools 2-1/8 to 6 inch.


Edited by gopher, February 12, 2016 - 05:02 PM.

  • boyscout862, dodge trucker and Oldford have said thanks

#8 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,769 Thanks
  • 7,534 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted February 12, 2016 - 05:02 PM

Several of the screw type hose clamps have worked well for me. That is why I have several of the 4" ones in my engine rebuilding chest.  You may need a hoist to hold the jugs. Good Luck, Rick


Edited by boyscout862, February 12, 2016 - 05:02 PM.

  • dodge trucker said thank you

#9 glgrumpy ONLINE  

glgrumpy

    Getting Out!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 8360
  • 6,659 Thanks
  • 6,470 posts
  • Location: Huntington, IN 46750 North East in State

Posted February 12, 2016 - 05:18 PM

ON MM tractors you can put the pistons in the jugs first, then lower whole assembly down over crank to connect rods later. Not sure you can get the case open for that on a presser.  I have used hose clamps too, but try to get bigger ones and either cut off the extra or mess with it flopping that has the slits. Try to keep mostly the smooth surface at the rings then I mean. Most tools can kind of "unwrap"  if you relase the clamp all the way and unwrap off the rod area and come out?? PIA, but works if you are big enough to have that room.


  • dodge trucker said thank you

#10 HDWildBill ONLINE  

HDWildBill

    Freedom is not Free. Thank those in uniform for your freedom.

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 6354
  • 8,702 Thanks
  • 8,557 posts
  • Location: Ga

Posted February 12, 2016 - 06:15 PM

like MiCarls said, all the MC engines I have worked on that have a removable cylinder had a chamfer at the bottom of the bore.  What I do is make a wood "U" shaped block that fits around the rod but supports the piston on the piston skirts.  Lower the piston down so it is sitting solid on the wood adapter then make sure you have the rings and cylinder well lubed then slowly work the piston into the cylinder.  Not sure about how an air compressor cylinder is shaped.


  • MFDAC, boyscout862 and dodge trucker have said thanks

#11 petrj6 ONLINE  

petrj6
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 53717
  • 3,808 Thanks
  • 2,219 posts
  • Location: petersbrgh ny

Posted February 12, 2016 - 08:17 PM

 If the hose clamp alone wont work for your ring compressor then use a piece of shim stock or very thin tin.  wrap that around the piston and rings then put the clamp over that to compress the rings.  that should work, I have used hose clamps forever.

                                                                                    Pete


  • Alc, boyscout862 and dodge trucker have said thanks

#12 Oldford OFFLINE  

Oldford
  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 50409
  • 802 Thanks
  • 572 posts
  • Location: n.e.

Posted February 12, 2016 - 08:39 PM

Old harley mechanic once told me not to mess around with monkeying the rings in there but use the proper ring compressor.   Something about the ring can nick the groove in the piston, leading to problems down the road.


  • boyscout862 and dodge trucker have said thanks

#13 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

Bill 76
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 49625
  • 1,640 Thanks
  • 1,054 posts
  • Location: 5miles west of Milwaukee Wisconsin

Posted February 12, 2016 - 09:12 PM

Cut up a beer can , wrap it around till it over laps about an inch and pull it tight with zip ties.Added bonus is you have to empty it first.


  • MFDAC, boyscout862, dodge trucker and 1 other said thanks

#14 MFDAC OFFLINE  

MFDAC

    Only member from Western South Dakota!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 5815
  • 2,028 Thanks
  • 1,123 posts
  • Location: East of Rapid City, SD in Rapid Valley

Posted February 12, 2016 - 09:13 PM

Don't know if this will help but only about a month ago my 40+ year old 2 cylinder Campbell Hausfeld was knocking so bad I thought it had galled out the rod bearings. When i took the jug off, the cylinders were still showing the cross hatch from an overhaul I gave it about 15 years ago and the rod/piston assembly was tight on the crank. The knock ended up to be crank side play which i was able to shim .010,

 

Anyway I couldn't remember how I compressed the rings, but the bottom of the bores had a chamfer like MiCarl and Wild Bill said. I just gently wobbled the jug and the highest piston slipped in nicely. I got the other one up to the jug and did the same thing with no problems. It's running great again besides a little bushing noise from the electric motor on a cold-shop start. Non-greaseable bushings.

 

DAC


Edited by MFDAC, February 12, 2016 - 09:14 PM.

  • Alc, HDWildBill, boyscout862 and 1 other said thanks

#15 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,439 Thanks
  • 1,896 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted February 12, 2016 - 10:07 PM

I got it, I had seen that chamfer that is cast in, didn't think that it alone would be enough to guide the rings in but I just wiggled the cylinder around and they went over. Just gotta put the finned tubes on between 1st and 2nd stages, get the flywheel on and break it in.
  • olcowhand, Cvans, MFDAC and 3 others have said thanks




Top