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Ridemaster cart-2


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#1 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2011 - 08:22 AM

I wasn't planning making any sort of box or cover for the battery on this Ridemaster cart.
Then I saw this neat battery cover with a lid on it at the Buckley swapmeet yesterday.
The overall cover is the right size to fit the old 6-volt battery's.
There is smaller raised area on the top of it that has an access lid on it.
This raised area is the right size to fit over a small garden tractor battery.
I cut the raised area off from the top of the battery cover.

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After I cut a strip of sheet metal, I then rolled the corners to form a box.

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Then I welded it to the battery cover to make a nice battery box.

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I had to cut the metal back on both sides of the battery tray for clearance for the new battery box.

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Then comes the interesting part. .....
The corners on the battery tray are square and the corners on the battery box are rounded.
Also, the length of the battery box is shorter than the tray but the width of the battery box is wider than the tray.
First I formed the bottom of the box so it had square corners.
Then I notched the corners so the ends of the box can set inside of the tray and the front and rear sides of the box can set outside of the tray.

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Here's how the box looks fit onto the tray.

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Next the bracket for the gas tank would not clear the top of the battery box.
I notched the tank mounting plate so the tank bracket will fit on the front side of the plate instead of the back side.

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With the tank bracket re-mounted, it now clears the top of the box and allows enough room for the lid to open so I can get to the battery cable bolts.

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I welded angle iron brackets on the front and rear sides for bolting the box down.

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I also welded angle iron brackets on the inside so they clamp the battery in place as the box is bolted down.

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I still have to drill holes in the front side of the box for the battery cables to go thru.
These will have rubber grommets to protect the cables.


The battery box and gas tank location are going to work out fine.
I drilled two holes in the front side of the battery box and installed rubber grommets in them.
The location of the gas tank still allows enough room for the lid to open and easily fasten the battery cables on.

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The positive cable runs down to the starter solenoid.

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The ground cable goes to the engine block.
I will have to take the tank off when I want to remove the battery but that won't be any problem either.
The tank is mounted with 3-bolts and they are easy to reach as you can see here.

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#2 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2011 - 08:23 AM

I'm going to use this old beat up dash box off an Allis Chalmers tractor.

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After straightening it out, I welded up the cracks in the corners and two of the holes in the face plate.
The small hole that is still there will be for the headlight switch.
I need to drill a hole for the starter switch but I don't have the switch yet so I don't know what size it will be.
The brackets for the choke and throttle are fastened to the side of the box.

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The box is bolted to the plate on top of the steering sprocket.

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Attaching the end of the throttle cable to the engine was easy.
I made up a bracket to hold the cable housing with a set screw.
Then I made a piece that fastens to the end of the throttle cable with a set screw and the spring from the governor attaches to it.

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The choke wasn't as easy to do.
These two carburetors are for the BKN engine.
The carb on the left has the stock choke lever that is designed to be operated by hand or with a solid pull rod from the front of the carb.
It is shown in the "open" position and the lever moves out ( away from the engine ) to close the choke.

The carb on the right is the one I'm using on the engine.
The first thing I did was to cut the choke lever off, reshape it and drill a small hole in the end for the cable.
Then I welded it back on the the choke rod so it points forward.
It is shown in the "open" position and pulls down to close the choke.

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Then I made up a bracket that attaches to the two screws on the front of the float bowl.
The end of this bracket has a clamp to hold the choke cable housing.

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The carb is mounted on the engine and the choke cable is set in place for a trial fit.
The choke cable needs to be shortened a little but I don't want to do that until after the wiring is all in place and I'm sure that every thing is fitting properly.
I'm going to run the wiring from the dash box down along side the throttle and choke cables.

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For those that may be a little confused to see the cables routed down thru the steering pulley.
The steering pulley ( and every thing mounted on it ), the battery, gas tank and engine all move as a single unit.

The only thing that is affected by the movement of the steering pulley is the "blue" shifter cable that goes thru the top of the steering pulley and down to the hydro transmission.
This cable has to bend where it goes thru the pulley as the tractor turns.

Here is a photo of the tractor making a very sharp left turn.
You can see how the throttle and choke cables aren't affected at all, only the shifter cable.

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Here is the dash box with the switches and amp gauge installed.
The wiring is run down along side the throttle and choke cables.
They are temporally fastened together with trash bag ties.

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With the gas tank mounted where it is, it is hard to reach under it to a shutoff valve.
So I put a 90 degree elbow in the bottom of the gas tank and extended a pipe out the right side for the shutoff valve.

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The ignition coil is mounted down on the frame under the engine on the right side.
The ballast resistor is mounted on the transmission mount just above the starter solenoid.

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Here's what it will look like with the shields on.

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So .. with all that completed, I put some gas in the tank, fired it up and drove it outside. :)

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I'm glad I decided to go with the hydro transmission instead of using the stock V-belt drive.
The Ridemaster axle uses a worm drive so it doesn't roll easily on it's own.
However, if your driving it down an incline and put the drive in neutral, the momentum of the worm screw already turning will let the tractor continue to coast down the incline ( there aren't any brakes on a Ridemaster ).

With the hydro transmission, when I put the drive in neutral, the tractor stops just like I put on the brakes.


I decided that I didn't like the gas line running on the same side of the engine with the exhaust.
My 1948 Ridemaster has the gas line on the opposite side of the engine.
They mounted a fuel sediment bowl on the side of the engine and ran a steel line from the bowl, behind the flywheel shroud and over to the carb.
Then a rubber line was run from the tank to the bowl.

In 1950 they raised the gas tank and mounted the sediment bowl right on the tank.
They still kept the steel line running across the front and fastened it to a bracket on the left side of the engine.
From there it was connected to the bowl with a rubber line.

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I copied that design and mounted a sediment bowl on the left side of the engine with a steel line going to the carb.
Then I turned the outlet tube around on the gas tank so it is coming out the left side and connected it to the bowl with a rubber line.

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There was probably enough clearance between the gas line and the exhaust on the other side of the engine, but I feel much safer with the gas line run this way.

#3 powerking56 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2011 - 10:40 AM

More nice work Ray, it is great!! Love the battery box!!
Peter
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#4 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2011 - 11:14 AM

Awesome work Ray. You have some remarkable talent.

The battery box is really cool but what I liked the best was the Mom's Limo keychain :D
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#5 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted April 26, 2011 - 11:42 AM

Very nice work Ray. Looks great.
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#6 scrapiron OFFLINE  

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Posted September 02, 2011 - 11:09 PM

You did a very good job Ray




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