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2-8-8-2 Locomotive


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#16 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 01, 2016 - 04:22 PM

Your talent and resourcefulness  amaze me. Nice work!


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#17 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2016 - 11:03 AM

The boiler is made out of a piece of 1-1/2" PVC drain pipe.
I wrap masking tape around where I want to cut the pipe.
By carefully  cutting along the front edge of the masking tape, I can make the cut close to being square to the pipe.

With the pipe cut to the overall length, I wrap another piece of masking tape alongside the first piece of tape.
At the back edge of this tape, I cut a small groove lengthwise in the pipe ( marked by the arrows ).
Then I cut the pipe again at the back edge of the second tape.
This is so I can put the shorter piece of pipe in the lathe.

To left of the pipe in the photo is a small piece of 1-1/4" PVC pipe that has been turned down to fit inside the 1-1/2" pipe.  

SAM_1099_zpscegnguaf.jpg


The short piece of 1-1/2" pipe is turned on the lathe to finish squaring the face.
The end is machined with a collar on it.

SAM_1100_zpssizby2e0.jpg


The smoke box fits onto this collar.

SAM_1101_zpsjewe4xgt.jpg


The piece of smaller pipe is put into the end of the larger pipe and glued in place.

SAM_1102_zps4x2roaro.jpg


The two pieces of pipe are glued back together with the small grooves lined up so it goes back together like it was.
The cut mark on the pipe will be covered with one of the boiler bands later.

SAM_1103_zps8hyannob.jpg

 

 

The electric motor and gear housing are mounted on the rear chassis.
The underside of the back of the boiler is cut out to clear the motor and gear housing.

SAM_1105_zpsgvjj5gzy.jpg


This is how it fits on the chassis.

SAM_1106_zps1aozx6xi.jpg


The cab unit is mounted on the rear chassis and the new "boiler" is glued to the cab.

SAM_1107_zps1bbtlo8n.jpg


Once that is dry, the smoke box is glued to the front of the boiler.
The overall basic shape of the engine is now set.

SAM_1112_zpszviypgd9.jpg


Edited by jdcrawler, February 05, 2016 - 11:20 AM.

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#18 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2016 - 02:26 PM

Wow , that's long! 


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#19 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted February 05, 2016 - 05:45 PM

Wow , that's long! 

Yeah, it is! Wow!


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#20 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2016 - 10:04 AM

Wow , that's long! 

 

 

Yeah, it is! Wow!

 

The actual 2-8-8-2 Norfolk & Western locomotive engine that I'm using as a pattern was over 60 foot long.  

Most of the big articulated engines in the 40's and 50's were longer than the average mobile home.

 

The largest articulated locomotive is the Union Pacific " Big Boy ".     It is a 4-8-8-4 wheel arrangement.

The engine itself is  a little over 85 foot long.    The overall length of the engine and tender is 132 FT 9-1/4 in.


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#21 Cvans ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2016 - 10:39 AM

Ray is there anything here that you would be interested in?

http://www.k-bid.com/auction/11823


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#22 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2016 - 03:02 PM

Wow my mobile home is 70 feet long. Hard to imagine a locomotive 10 feet shorter than my house chugging down the track. 

 

Incredible job. When do you have time for this when you are building a house too?


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#23 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2016 - 06:53 PM

Ray is there anything here that you would be interested in?

http://www.k-bid.com/auction/11823

 

Thank you for the auction link.   It was interesting to look thru.

Those Lionel, Marx and American flyer trains have been around for a long time and some of them are worth quite a lot of money.

They are however "toy trains" in that they were not built to look like realistic trains.  

They have oversize flanges on the wheels and oversize couplers and they ran on a 3-rail track.

 

Lionel ( and other company's ) are making trains now that look much more realistic but they still have oversize wheel flanges and couplers and still run on 3-rail track.

 

I model what is called "2-rail O-scale" trains".   

These are built so everything on them is to scale size and they run on 2-rail track just like the real trains.

 

Most modelers in this scale are very particular about everything on the model being exactly as it was on the real locomotive and their models are completely detailed inside and out.

Those guys do fantastic work and their models look exactly like the real thing.

A lot of them go as far as weathering them so they look like a locomotive ( or rail cars ) that is dirty and rusty and has been running down the track for years.

They also can spend years and a lot of money building one locomotive that can be worth several thousand dollars when it is finished.

 

I however am not that dedicated or that fussy.

I build what is called "freelance models" and there are others like me that enjoy building freelance.

We build more for just the enjoyment of building things and whereas we want the model to look realistic and everything is built to the right scale size, it isn't necessarily  an exact replica of a real piece of railroad equipment.

My models don't cost me a lot of money to build and they aren't worth a lot when the are finished, but I sure get a lot of enjoyment out of building them.


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#24 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 06, 2016 - 07:14 PM

Wow my mobile home is 70 feet long. Hard to imagine a locomotive 10 feet shorter than my house chugging down the track. 

 

Incredible job. When do you have time for this when you are building a house too?

 

That "Big Boy" locomotive is 15 foot longer than your home.

Can you imagine how much that would shake the ground going past at 60 or 70 MPH and pulling a two mile long line of rail cars behind it ?

The Union Pacific Railroad is in the process of restoring one of the Big Boy locomotives and putting it back into running condition.

When it is finished, it will be back out on the rail for excursion runs.

I would certainly like to be able to have the opportunity to stand by a track and take a video of it running by me. 

 

The house is still in the first stage of getting closed in and the metal roofing is being put on now ( weather permitting ).

So when it is too cold or raining, I play with my trains.

It is still getting dark early so that also gives me time in the evenings to play with my trains.

 

Working on model trains has always been a inside winter project for most of my life.

It gets more attention now because I don't have a garage set up to work on garden tractors.

Once I get a garage set up again, I'll go back to playing in the garage in the summer and playing with the trains in the winter.


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#25 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 04:57 PM

I used thin strips of styrene to make the bands on the boiler.

SAM_1115_zpszvmjvmmu.jpg


The foot boards are made from strips that are cut from a sheet diamond patterned styrene.
These strips are only .020 thick and very flexible.
So a strip of balsa wood is first glued onto the side of the boiler for the foot board.
Then the styrene strip is glued on top of the balsa wood.

SAM_1116_zpsqxsoffgn.jpg


The outside edge of the balsa wood strip is covered with a strip of styrene to give the foot board edge a smooth finish that the paint won't soak into.

SAM_1117_zpsmvbxyykz.jpg


The steam supply lines for the rear cylinders are made up from styrene tubing and elbows.
The caps for the ends of the pipes at the cylinders and the "T" pipe connection to the cylinders are machined from a piece of clear styrene rod.
The "S" curve in the lines is made from a 90 deg. elbow that is cut in half and then glued back together so one end faces forward and the other end faces back.

The parts used are in the top of the photo and the finished parts are at the bottom.

SAM_1120_zpsjitzzgap.jpg


The steam supply lines are attached to the boiler and the end of the "T" fitting sets into the top of the steam cylinder.

SAM_1121_zpstj6v7imo.jpg


The two steam supply lines are attached so they stay with the boiler when the rear chassis is removed.

SAM_1123_zpsyart0e4w.jpg


These are some parts of boilers from the AHM 0-8-0 kit that still have some usable items on them.

SAM_1124_zpszrdp9oac.jpg


I cut them apart and that leaves me a smoke box that can be used for another locomotive model and some parts to go on this locomotive.

SAM_1125_zps6b621ptq.jpg


The smoke box is put away in a drawer and the other parts are trimmed down to fit on top of the boiler.
Here's how it looks so far.

SAM_1127_zpseymkuloj.jpg
 


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#26 KennyP OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 05:25 PM

That is awesome, Ray! Gonna be a fine looking loco when you are done!


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#27 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 05:38 PM

Wow. Great work as usual. 


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#28 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2016 - 08:32 AM

Ray can you put something next to it to compare size? Like a coin next to those steam pipes to give an idea of how small things really are. I am imagining my "HO" scale and I remember "O" scale to be somewhat larger. Thanks  and as always ,I look forward to seeing your progress. 


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#29 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2016 - 10:44 AM

Ray can you put something next to it to compare size? Like a coin next to those steam pipes to give an idea of how small things really are. I am imagining my "HO" scale and I remember "O" scale to be somewhat larger. Thanks  and as always ,I look forward to seeing your progress. 

 

Sure thing . ...

 

SAM_1128 - Copy.JPG

 

 

HO scale are the most popular model trains today.    The term "HO"  stands for "half O" scale.    O-scale is 1:48 scale and HO is 1:87 scale.

 

Before WW2, O-scale dominated the train market although some companies tried producing smaller scale trains but none were very successful. 

After the war there were a lot of men and women who went into the war as kids in their late teens and were now young adults starting families of their own.

There was a housing boom of smaller homes being built for all the returning solders and model railroad manufactures responded by producing the smaller HO scale trains that would fit in a smaller space.

 

The HO train market really started taking off in the 1950's and by the mid 60's they surpassed the sales of O-scale railroads.


Edited by jdcrawler, February 14, 2016 - 10:46 AM.

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#30 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2016 - 11:06 AM

HO scale stands for "Half O" in case anyone was wondering. I relate very well with O scale since I collect American Flyer S gauge (1:64) and most accessories were closer to O scale.

Edited by wvbuzzmaster, February 14, 2016 - 11:08 AM.

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