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#16 Greasy6020 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 11:28 AM

I shoulda explained... I will be growing corn to sell. I wanted a list of implements I should get as a priority. For now I'm worrying about getting my stuff taken care of and then putting the profits back into the company to pay for better stuff...

Eventually I will be doing custom work for other people after I get sufficient funds to get a good tiller and hydrostatic tractor ( like a john deere 318 or similar...)

For the first few years the plan is to grow corn and maybe a little custom work for family and close friends. Then I will take on more custom work.

Edited by Greasy6020, January 20, 2016 - 11:31 AM.

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#17 milkman44 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 12:31 PM

IMHO
Dependable tractor (with aw crap moment spare parts)
Plow
Tiller
Cart to haul produce

Other implements that are nice
Harrows / cultivators with changeable sweeps
Hiller (can be part of the cultivator kit)


Things to keep in mind...
Make the damn rows too wide.
Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to run the tiller and tractor (or cultivators and tractor) down between the rows once the crop starts to grow. There goes your well planned garden.
Tiller width + foilage spread + extra room = distance between rows.
Alternates: walk behind tiller for weeding, hands and knees method, plastic between the rows.

Run the rows perpendicular to the watershed if possible.

Plan water, lime and fertilizer dispensing. No sense in watering or feeding the weeds...

Even if your equipment is all brand new, have a plan B in mind.
(Some would say especially if the equipment is new)

Look at the ends of your rows, what will you run into if you're driving a tractor? Do you have ample room to maneuver?

If doing corn, remember
One for the cutworm,
One for the crow,
One to rot, and one to grow.


You may also look into doing multiple crops from the land. I plan on doing corn and beans or peas together this year. The Indians used to plant the three sisters.attachicon.gifimage.jpg


I remember my mom used to say that when planting the garden, you must be older than dirt if you remember that sayn'. O wait, never mind I remember it and I'm not OLD. Do you by any chance remember what Privy Bush looks like or did it have another name?
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#18 Cub123 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 01:14 PM

I shoulda explained... I will be growing corn to sell. I wanted a list of implements I should get as a priority. For now I'm worrying about getting my stuff taken care of and then putting the profits back into the company to pay for better stuff...
Eventually I will be doing custom work for other people after I get sufficient funds to get a good tiller and hydrostatic tractor ( like a john deere 318 or similar...)
For the first few years the plan is to grow corn and maybe a little custom work for family and close friends. Then I will take on more custom work.

I like to plow, disc to bust up the big lumps, and then till. The heavier Cat.0 discs also work well to chop up weeds and dead plants before plowing. Here are some pictures of doing some planting after prepping my small horse corn plot. Picking and husking was the most work.
1434468757_zpsb096c3e9.jpg
1434484891_zpsca9b2a93.jpg
1434489819_zpsaabf9c22.jpg
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#19 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 02:54 PM

I remember my mom used to say that when planting the garden, you must be older than dirt if you remember that sayn'. O wait, never mind I remember it and I'm not OLD. Do you by any chance remember what Privy Bush looks like or did it have another name?

I think you are thinking of PRIVET BUSH, it was commonly used for hedges back in the 50s and you should be able to find it by doing a google search.



#20 milkman44 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 04:09 PM

Don't think it was Privet Bush, mom  said my grandma used it for medicine. Might have been a bush that grew by the privy "outhouse" and didn't know the name so just called it Privy Bush. Didn't aim to side track the OP thread.


Edited by milkman44, January 20, 2016 - 04:10 PM.


#21 Greasy6020 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 06:02 PM

Don't think it was Privet Bush, mom said my grandma used it for medicine. Might have been a bush that grew by the privy "outhouse" and didn't know the name so just called it Privy Bush. Didn't aim to side track the OP thread.


So cares if you sidetracked it... I'm learning cool stuff!
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#22 Gtractor OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 06:17 PM

I second the small walk behind for cultivating. With a one-row cultivator it doesn't matter how tall the crop is. 

 

Something like a:

Choremaster

Lil Farmer

Super Tuffy

George


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#23 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 10:40 PM

I second the small walk behind for cultivating. With a one-row cultivator it doesn't matter how tall the crop is. 

 

Something like a:

Choremaster

Lil Farmer

Super Tuffy

George

well I was thinking more something like a 12bb bolens or a Planet jr, something easier to find the tooling for. you can take a PJ down to work inside of 15" rows.


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#24 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2016 - 06:36 AM

Will you be planting your corn in single rows or I've seen two rows planted close , say 10" apart with standard spacing between the double rows ?



#25 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2016 - 06:24 PM

Will you be planting your corn in single rows or I've seen two rows planted close , say 10" apart with standard spacing between the double rows ?

That is an interesting concept and I have read of farmers in the Midwest experimenting with narrow rows.

From what I have read,  the jury is still out on its success.   It seems to depend on soil fertility and weather being perfect to increase yield.

The idea is that the canopy would shade the ground and thus reduce weed growth.

It makes me wonder if completion for nutrients and moisture  would stunt the growth of both plants competing?


Edited by JD DANNELS, January 21, 2016 - 06:25 PM.

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#26 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2016 - 07:49 PM

There could be issues with pollen not getting to the silk if to close. Last year, I got some of the planting to close (just had a handful left... cant waste it) and that area had ears that weren't full on the cob.
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#27 Greasy6020 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2016 - 08:17 PM

dunno if I'll do twin rows... Seems neat just by what you guys say.
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#28 gregsl OFFLINE  

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Posted January 26, 2016 - 12:11 PM

I would ask the granting agency for an overview of the criteria they use to screen the applicants. Then put the criteria across the top of a spreadsheet and an extensive list of equipment down the side of the spreadsheet. Then analyze each of the pieces of equipment according to their criteria.  Once you have done that you can rank them according to the results.  Some of them wont make sense so you would have to relate them according to the goals in your business plan (your own criteria) and suggestions from this thread.

 

Whoever is screening your application needs something on record to defend why they gave/should give you the grant.  I see that you are in Northern Ontario.. Most of the farm/seed co-ops in Ontario have business development officers or something similar that could help you out too.  They would have all the numbers relating to growing corn.

 

Spreadsheets tend to open wallets, lol


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