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Essential implements


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#1 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 04:48 PM

I need a list of essential implements for use in gardening. Like a plow disk and other essentials.

I need to know as I am putting a business plan together for a summer company grant that my school puts on. I have a budget of $1500.

Any suggestions are appreciated.
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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 04:59 PM

I find that a tiller does a nice job and have never really used the plows or discs except for playing. If you are doing a business, you need to have very reliable equipment. I go with the extra equipment for redundancy. Be very carefull and conservative when doing a business plan. There are always things that go wrong, allow for them. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 05:18 PM

A cultivator, a cart, and a few hand tools.
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#4 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 05:22 PM

A trailer and something to haul said trailer.  

 

I appreciate your ambition. But don't forget; this will be a seasonal exercise. Maybe include lawn care and snow removal into the mix. You could use your equipment year round.

 

Tillers leave a nice texture that will appeal to the average homeowner/gardener.

 

Maybe add a drag to smooth out the soil?


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#5 HANKG ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 05:35 PM

It depends on your soil , does it have to be broken up first is it rocky a tiller does a great job in soft dirt and makes planting vegetables easy but you may need a plow and disc and till for finish product.



#6 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 06:13 PM

What are you growing.

Noel

#7 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 07:08 PM

IMHO
Dependable tractor (with aw crap moment spare parts)
Plow
Tiller
Cart to haul produce

Other implements that are nice
Harrows / cultivators with changeable sweeps
Hiller (can be part of the cultivator kit)


Things to keep in mind...
Make the damn rows too wide.
Nothing is more frustrating than not being able to run the tiller and tractor (or cultivators and tractor) down between the rows once the crop starts to grow. There goes your well planned garden.
Tiller width + foilage spread + extra room = distance between rows.
Alternates: walk behind tiller for weeding, hands and knees method, plastic between the rows.

Run the rows perpendicular to the watershed if possible.

Plan water, lime and fertilizer dispensing. No sense in watering or feeding the weeds...

Even if your equipment is all brand new, have a plan B in mind.
(Some would say especially if the equipment is new)

Look at the ends of your rows, what will you run into if you're driving a tractor? Do you have ample room to maneuver?

If doing corn, remember
One for the cutworm,
One for the crow,
One to rot, and one to grow.

You may also look into doing multiple crops from the land. I plan on doing corn and beans or peas together this year. The Indians used to plant the three sisters.image.jpg
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#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 09:55 PM

1 spade or turning fork and 1 hoe.  every implement will be doing the same jobs as those two in one way or another.


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#9 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 10:01 PM

A good heavy GT, rear hitch tiller for prepping garden, walk behind tiller for weed control during garden growth.  Never seen benefit of a disc, as they cause compaction.  Cultivators only useable a short time due to plant height getting too tall for GT to straddle, and most GT's/cultivators are too wide to set rows to drive in between.


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#10 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 10:27 PM

A good heavy GT, rear hitch tiller for prepping garden, walk behind tiller for weed control during garden growth. Never seen benefit of a disc, as they cause compaction. Cultivators only useable a short time due to plant height getting too tall for GT to straddle, and most GT's/cultivators are too wide to set rows to drive in between.


Disk is good for sizing clods, cutting residue and knocking down grass "here"
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#11 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 10:29 PM

Personally I would a pair of different walking tractors. Since no one really wants them any ways you should be able to get them pretty cheap. Get a heavier one for plowing/ disking the ground up, and a lighter one for doing the cultivating. Un like riders you can go over the top of a row many more times to get all the weeds you can. Weeds here are the key to success, as they will suck all the goody right out of the ground before you can blink, and then you'll have no crop to sell at all or a stunted one at best.  By being able to go over the top of the rows, you can now plant closer together and not waste ground making roads just to drive equipment on, and get a bigger yield.


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#12 MH81 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 10:29 PM

Big discs will do that, GT discs, not as much.

 

They just don't weigh enough.  Put enough weight on them and you're straining to lift them.

 

If you balance the weight/lift and do multiple passes, they will do OK


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#13 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 07:38 AM

Big discs will do that, GT discs, not as much.

They just don't weigh enough. Put enough weight on them and you're straining to lift them.

If you balance the weight/lift and do multiple passes, they will do OK


Agreed, I don't have a gt disk so I wouldn't know....
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#14 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 09:23 AM

I have a plow and tandem disks. What they are good for is a lot of fun and seat time, but realy they are good for preparing the ground, the year before you plant. Plow and disk your sod for the garden this year and leave it sit for the winter , then on the next spring , use the tiller to prepair the ground for planting, and it's much easier to till, than trying to till sod. Disking and harrowing compacks the ground a lot.

Noel
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#15 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 10:30 AM

A plow is a must for new gardens. A tiller is a must for prep (I like to till in fall), and a cultivator is best for weed prevention. Tilling too much will simply result in more irrigation needs.

I like the idea of inexpensive walk behinds.

Are you simply offering post and pre-season prep or full season garden care? Are you harvesting for clients too?




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