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Growing sweet corn


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#16 Marty'70 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 08:05 PM

Great method! Inappropriate for my living conditions. Step mom is a peta nut vegetarian....


PETA.. hahahahaha People Eating Tasty Animals.. Oh Lord I apologize! I'm sorry it just flew right out of my mouth.
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#17 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 09:06 PM

How far north are you? For the "supersweet" varieties of corn that everyone seems to want these days you'll need a pretty lengthy frost free window. I have found that Vision is a very tasty variety but needs about 90-100 frost free days. You probably know already not to mix the super sweets with normal sugar varieties.Skyrydr2 is right, stagger your plantings so you have fresh corn ready over an extended period, or plant varieties with different maturing dates. As far as racoons go, I have had good luck with electric fencing, one wire about 8" off the ground and a second at about 14". A good dog can work wonders as well if you live in an area where it can be out all night.

I'm a touch North of the Minnesota Canada border.

#18 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 09:08 PM

PETA.. hahahahaha People Eating Tasty Animals.. Oh Lord I apologize! I'm sorry it just flew right out of my mouth.


Good man! They are tasty! Nice rack of pork ribs some sweet corn taters carrots and a glass of milk... Got me drooling now...
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#19 johndeereelfman OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 10:37 PM

JohnDeereelfmans example indicates $3.50 in his area. 

 

Yes, in our area, the average price is around $3.50 a dozen, however that's after the early picking, and just about when everyone is tired of eating corn! Around here, the Amish are always the first to have sweet corn for sale. Most of them start planting seeds first of March, then cover all of their rows with black plastic. As soon as the stalks are about 6"-8" high, they uncover the stalks, and it's usually right around the last frost. Normal farmers go by the old saying of "knee high by the fourth of July" whereas the Amish usually have sweet corn for sale as early as the beginning of June already. In most cases, the first pickings around here average between $4.00-$4.50 a dozen, and that's only at road side stands. The grocery stores want that much for just a half dozen. 

 

I grew sweet corn a couple of years ago here in town, and although it produced a good yield, it was hard work. You have to keep it watered, but yet not too much, as you don't want to rot out the seeds. I used raised beds one year and I had a great crop. The following year I got lazy and planted the corn without raised beds, and only had about a dozen stalks produce out of about 50 stalks planted. The good year, I planted my seeds about 6" apart, whereas the year after (the not so good year) I planted the seeds about 8"-10" apart. Not sure how much of a difference the seed spacing really made, but I'm pretty sure the raised beds compared to the non-raised beds is really what hurt me. 

 

Not sure if it matters to you or not, but I planted the Silver King version of corn.

 

001.JPG Birthday and Garden 011.JPG


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#20 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 11:01 PM

I've been growing Sweet Corn for many years and have come up with a way that takes  minimum work.

Disc the ground the fall before. Spread old horse manure the fall before and use a drag to spread it.

In the spring disc it and drag it couple of weeks before planting. The next is very important. 

Plant the rows far enough apart so you can drive down them with a garden tractor and tiller to cultivate. 

Water if needed . Then comes the fun part, pick and eat.  :thumbs:


Edited by Cvans, January 18, 2016 - 11:02 PM.

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#21 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 07:41 AM

I don't have access to a tractor mounted tiller... I can make a cultivator. Plan for that is 3 12" chisel plow sweeps put on c shank cultivator tines in a V shape. i likely will make a bracket (barn door hinge with a piece that slides over the drawbar) and make it follow straight behind and have a trailer jack with an axle on the bottom for lift. So basically like a brinly cultivator but with 3 shanks and a jack to lift it.

I think I can cheat this year and borrow the massey ferguson 135 and disk from dad...

For a planter I'm thinking of getting 2 earth way planters and making a toolbar with them on it with rows that are 6" wider than the Moto Mower then building the cultivator accordingly.

Feel free to give suggestions on the planter and cultivator. Thanks for your help!
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#22 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 08:24 AM

Nope, if it aint made for a tool bar it won't work behind one !! Trust me.. Been there done that... That much corn you can plant with the walk behind planter in half an hour, this way you can see what your doing too. Get the fertilizer attachment for it as well, it works the bomb !
As the corn gets a few leaves high ,side dress it with the fertilizer Attachment about 4" away or less. Then do it again just as the corn gets ready to tassel.
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#23 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 09:42 AM

   Two ways to plant that I use. My garden is approx. 70' x 150'. If planting length wise I have a piece of conduit with a piece of chain on each end that attaches to the front of the tractor. The length of the conduit matches the row spacing and the chains drag on the ground and mark the rows. Then I walk down the rows with the earthway planter. Takes very little time or effort. Also have an aluminum tube that can be mounted on the earthway planter to mark rows.

   Something that I started doing a couple of years ago that makes planting really nice is to till the garden just before planting and then pull a roller over it. The row markings really show up and it makes pushing the earthway much easier. Your going to find that you can plant your garden very quickly on foot with just one earthway. You should try it before going to the trouble of building something to pull behind your tractor.


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#24 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 12:11 PM

So my dad is gonna plant the corn with grandpas massey ferguson 135 and a John Deere 3 row tool bar planter. But that can be changed to wider rows.

I'll see if I can't build the cultivator in welding next semester.
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#25 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 12:44 PM

I don't have access to a tractor mounted tiller... I can make a cultivator. Plan for that is 3 12" chisel plow sweeps put on c shank cultivator tines in a V shape. i likely will make a bracket (barn door hinge with a piece that slides over the drawbar) and make it follow straight behind and have a trailer jack with an axle on the bottom for lift. So basically like a brinly cultivator but with 3 shanks and a jack to lift it.

I think I can cheat this year and borrow the massey ferguson 135 and disk from dad...

For a planter I'm thinking of getting 2 earth way planters and making a toolbar with them on it with rows that are 6" wider than the Moto Mower then building the cultivator accordingly.

Feel free to give suggestions on the planter and cultivator. Thanks for your help!

I have two gardenway planters and while I have seen others mount them on toolbars for the GT, I am very skeptical.

The light aluminum frames are so flexible they twist even when pushed by hand. In my heavy soil running them on a toolbar would turn them into pretsels in no time at all.

I planted three times last year before on the 4th planting I got a decent stand. Not at all sure why it would not germinate?

I plant everything in my garden on 36 inch row spacing. Since my tractor mounted tiller is 48 inches wide. I have a troybuilt super bronco that tills 20 inches and that is what I run between the rows.

The John Deere planter is the way to go in my opinion.


Edited by JD DANNELS, January 19, 2016 - 12:45 PM.

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#26 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 02:11 PM

I planted three times last year before on the 4th planting I got a decent stand.

 

I had the same problem and it turned out to be those little stripey gophers. My garden is next to a pasture. I would plant the seeds and shortly after germination they would dig the seeds up. The hole they dig is really small and almost looks like a bird did it with their beak. Had to ask someone else what the heck was going on. Next year the Gophers are getting a dose of lead poisoning.  :smilewink:


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#27 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 05:38 PM

I had the same problem and it turned out to be those little stripey gophers. My garden is next to a pasture. I would plant the seeds and shortly after germination they would dig the seeds up. The hole they dig is really small and almost looks like a bird did it with their beak. Had to ask someone else what the heck was going on. Next year the Gophers are getting a dose of lead poisoning.  :smilewink:

I do  have some of the 13 line striped gophers, but they must have been really hungry because I planted 8 rows and not a stalk came up.

then planted 8 rows in each of the other two plantings and got about 20 stalks to come up.


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#28 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 11:39 PM

8 rows and not a stalk came up.

 

What the world? You had to have some bad seed corn or your soil is dry or dead. That's really pathetic results for all that work.



#29 Tim Bergfeld OFFLINE  

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Posted January 19, 2016 - 11:55 PM

I've been growing Sweet Corn for many years and have come up with a way that takes minimum work.
Disc the ground the fall before. Spread old horse manure the fall before and use a drag to spread it.
In the spring disc it and drag it couple of weeks before planting. The next is very important.
Plant the rows far enough apart so you can drive down them with a garden tractor and tiller to cultivate.
Water if needed . Then comes the fun part, pick and eat. :thumbs:

That's how I do it too it keeps weeds down and soil lose with minimal effort.
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#30 ACmowerguy OFFLINE  

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Posted January 20, 2016 - 12:41 AM

I have an earthway planter that was given to me. It only has one size seed plate for corn. It just plain doesn't work with the sweet corn varieties sold in my area. The holes are too big and the seeds are not planted accurately. To test the planter I raised the depth adjustment all the way up so the planter could be rolled on the concrete drive with no interference. After pushing it along I would end up with the seeds dropping completely erratically. It would skip at times and overplant at times. It is also too light to cut into the furrow and repack over the seed. Now anyone who row crop farms, (at least prior to the "finger pick up" days when planters still had plates, it was common that the seed companies would provide you with the correct sized plates for the variety of seed purchased. A "one size fits all" approach just doesn't work for corn seed. Sorry for the rant.

 

As for tillage, that will vary based on the soil types and locations. I used to fall plow my garden. It is on a slight slope and I found that by springtime I would often experience some erosion. As a result I no longer work the ground in the fall. I do not spring plow either because my clay soil needs to "over winter" before it will mellow enough to break up the slabs with a disk and tiller. Instead I save the plow for GT plow days in better soil and just use a tractor mounted tiller to work the garden. After getting the ground tilled finely I would use a sleeve hitch cultivator with all but two standards removed and adjust the remaining two to the desired row with. I would then tow the cultivator through to line out my rows. Then I would hand plant a couple of seeds every six inches or so and cover them back up with a hoe. I can't take credit for the cultivator idea as I know I read about it on a tractor forum somewhere.  In our dry summers, watering was crucial and was done with a couple of sprinklers and soaker hoses. I always had lots of problems with bugs. The corn in the Midwest is very prone to ear worms. For me it was rare to get two good ears to a plant.

 

As for the princes auto disk, I doubt you will get near as good of results as using a tiller. Unless its a tandem disk it will leave hills at each end. On a tandem disk the front gang throws the dirt outward and the rear pulls it back toward the center leaving you a more level seedbed. A tandem disk would likely be too much for your Moto-Mower to pull without risking damage. The disk will not work the soil very deep (unless its a larger one pulled behind a farm tractor) and would likely leave you with more compacted soil than the tiller.


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