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Ridemaster cart-1


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#1 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2011 - 07:25 AM

This is a motorcycle oil cooler that I got off ebay.

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It is mounted underneath the engine, along side of the cooling fan for the hydro transmission.

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I had fittings put on the ends of the hose so they fit onto the hydro transmission.
One hose comes from top of the hydro pump and goes into the cooler.
The other hose runs from the cooler to the return fitting on the side of the transmission.

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This is the control lever that is used to raise and lower the engine on the original drive system for a Ridemaster.
This lever will control the forward, neutral & reverse on the hydrostatic transmission.

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Using a shift control cable, I mounted one end to this lever.

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The shift lever for the hydro is underneath the transmission and moves forward and backward.
The shift cable will be mounted along side the transmission and will move up and down.
I need to build a 90 degree shift bracket that will change the cable's up & down motion to a forward & backward motion.

These are the parts that I built for this bracket.
The control arm at the top left fits onto the pin on the transmission shifter lever.
It is attached to a lever that is welded on a shaft.
This shaft fits into the round steel tube at the top right.
This steel tube has brass bushings in each end.
The lever at the bottom right clamps on the end of the shaft and the arm on the bottom left will fasten to it and connect to the shifter cable.

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With the 90 degree bracket all assembled, this is how it looks with the shift cable attached to it.

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Here's a view of the 90 degree bracket with all the linkage attached.

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A side view of the overall shifter cable assembly.

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The top of the hydrostatic transmission has a plastic cap in it with a barb for a 5/16 hose.
I'm assuming the 5/16 hose went to a tank that was used to fill the transmission.

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This is a small round tank that I got off ebay.
It had three 1/4 inch diameter tubes in it. One in the end, one in the top and one in the bottom.
I removed the tubes from the end and the top and soldered caps over the holes.
The tube in the bottom was replaced with a 5/16 hose fitting.

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Using a section of steel strap, I bent it to fit the tank for a mounting bracket.
Then I cut a hose clamp in half and riveted the two ends to the mounting bracket.
The tank mounting bracket is welded to the support plate under the steering sprocket.

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Here is how it looks with the tank mounted.

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Before I run the 5/16 hose from the transmission to the tank, I want to make a guard for the drive sprocket.
I cut a section of sheet metal and bent it at a 90 degrees in the small brake.

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Then I formed it into a "U" shape.

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I riveted a piece of angle iron on each side so the guard can be bolted to the frame.

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With the guard in place, I ran the 5/16 hose from the transmission up to the tank and re-mounted the engine.

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I decided that I didn't like the looks of the two piece strap on the hydraulic tank.
So I replaced the 2-piece tie-down strap on with a single piece strap with the screw on the bottom.

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Here are the straps on the gas tank so you can see that they all match now.

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#2 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2011 - 07:26 AM

Next was to mount the small generator.
I made up a mounting bracket for the bottom flange on the generator and welded it to the side of the frame.

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Here's how it looks from the back showing the tension adjusting bracket on the top flange of the generator.

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View from the side showing how the V-belt runs off the pulley behind the flywheel.

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And a view from the front showing how the generator is tucked up close to the engine.

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The fender already has two holes drilled in it where some one had mounted something before so I'm going to mount the voltage regulator in the same place to cover those holes.
I drilled and tapped the mounting holes and installed two studs.

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The voltage regulator is mounted and the wires are run down to the generator.

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Now it's time to start making some guards. .....
With the flywheel cover on, the ring gear for the starter is fully exposed behind it.

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Starting with the left side, I bent up some sheet metal to cover the ring gear and also the starter bendix.

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On the right side, I used a section of angle iron to cover the area where the ring gear is.
This gives me a thicker piece of metal to bolt the belt guard for the generator to later.

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I then made up the belt guard for the generator and you can see how the top of the guard bolts to the angle iron.

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Here is a view of the front of the generator belt guard with the bottom of it bolted to the side of the flywheel cover.

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Next in line was to make a guard for the belt on the front.
Here I'm forming the outside of the guard.
The side of the guard has been cut and the metal bent forward where it fits over the tension pulley.

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The mounting bracket is welded to the right side and bolted to the frame.

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I formed a round cover for the tension pulley and welded it to the side of the guard.

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I made a mount and welded it to the left side of the guard and bolted it to the frame.
Then I cut out a section of flat steel for the bottom and welded it and the grill section in place.
Here is the finished guard ( I still need to make mounts for the bottom of the guard but I need to make up the side guards first ).

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#3 Bruce Dorsi ONLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2011 - 11:57 AM

Nice work, Ray!

I have never seen a small generator like you're using. .....What is it from?
  • jdcrawler said thank you

#4 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2011 - 12:41 PM

Great Job Ray!
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#5 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2011 - 03:49 PM

I have never seen a small generator like you're using. .....What is it from?

I got that off ebay and it is for a Kubota tractor.
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#6 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted April 25, 2011 - 09:42 PM

Very neat! Thanks for sharing the pics.

Bet that'll be a conversation starter at the shows.
  • jdcrawler said thank you




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