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I hate suprise midnight shifts


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#1 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 07:06 PM

Worked last night from 1am to 11am. Worked 7 till 5 Thursday then out Friday "morning" for the midnight. 3 hours of sleep as this was a surprise you gotta go to work!

We lost an electric motor on the our slope belt. Motor weighed 33,000lbs. It was in top of a 7 story building. The roof of the building had to be removed with a crane. Then the same crane picked up the old motor pulled it out. Then set the new one in place. Worse crane operators I have ever seen but the job was done with a few hiccups.

We did the alignment for the grid coupler. Nothing like trying to move a 33,000 pound motor into an alignment spec of .002" with a porta power and some sloppy pusher bolts.

And we changed out two skf 10" bearings on belt rollers.

Productive night!
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#2 classic OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 07:31 PM

I feel your pain. I had to do five blind pics to remove a couple of large fans, electric motors, and covers. The crane operator never ran this particular crane before, but luckily he had the operators manual with him. We used radios to communicate to thread everything we picked. Lots of wires ladders and catwalks to weave everything through. Luckily the operator was patient and did a great job. We use Para-flex elements and grid couplings between our motors and whatever they are driving. It takes time to properly align the shafts, and most people won't take the time to get things spot on. It was minus 15 last winter while we were changing out a large trunion bearing on one of our peers. It really sucks working to in that weather with a lack of sleep, but it's a good feeling to wrap it up and get back on line.

Edited by classic, January 15, 2016 - 07:36 PM.

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#3 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 07:40 PM

We spent a good while lining this motor up. I've been involved with many alignments over the years but I couldn't do it alone. I'm good at writing, lifting and putting in shims. I can look at the sheet and figure out where it needs to go and how much but I've never ran the dial indicators before. I guess I probably could.

We also have a new laser alignment tool that we played with awhile waiting for the electricians to finishing wiring so they could bump the motor and check rotations before we finished our alignments

IMG_20160115_065816913.jpg

I wish I had the pictures of the worst motor I ever seen. It 2000 hp motor. The bearing failed, the case split, and the armature was hanging out the back of the motor. This was one a vent fan for the mine. Happened at 3am during a snow storm and it was zero out with 15 to 20 mph winds. That was the worst.

Edited by toomanytoys84, January 15, 2016 - 07:47 PM.

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#4 classic OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 07:50 PM

Patients is the key, especially on high dollar parts for equipment that runs 24/7.
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#5 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 07:54 PM

2K horse?!?!   :biting_nails:

 

Lots of 500 MCM wire going to power that puppy!!  YIKES!

 

We have a few 500 HP motors @ work and they work off some hefty variable speed drives!  They do weigh quite a bit!  

 

Sounds like quite an operation!  .002" is a really tight clearance for a ~6" or so motor shaft!   


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#6 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 08:19 PM

I wish I had the pictures of the worst motor I ever seen. It 2000 hp motor. The bearing failed, the case split, and the armature was hanging out the back of the motor. This was one a vent fan for the mine. Happened at 3am during a snow storm and it was zero out with 15 to 20 mph winds. That was the worst.


Was the mine without ventilation while it was down?

#7 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 08:44 PM

Was the mine without ventilation while it was down?

Yea. After a vent fan shuts down a timer starts. We have 15 minutes to get the fan running again or everyone must be evacuated until the fan is running again. Once the fan is running again the entire mine must be inspected (fire bossed). Basically the fireboss takes air flow readings and checks for gas build up. After the all clear is given by them workers can go back to work.

Most of the time we get them running before we have to evacuate. It is usually a simple problem that shuts them down as they have several protective measures to keep the fan from harming itself.

Edited by toomanytoys84, January 15, 2016 - 08:46 PM.

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#8 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 08:35 AM

Sounds like "over-time" pay to me


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#9 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 09:09 AM

I remember those days, when I worked industrial maintenance at a steel mill,  and at the soybean processing plant. 

 

we had a similar deal with a 4th floor motor pull at the soybean place in their biodiesel building. though, fortunately, for "that" particular job, I was on days that week....  Lotsa  night shifts, long shifts "nobody leaves til we're back up n running"  led to 18-20 hour shifts at times..


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#10 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 01:38 PM

"nobody leaves til we're back up n running" led to 18-20 hour shifts at times..


Been through many of those! But when I get involved in a big job like that I lose total track of time till I suddenly feel like I'm going to fall asleep or get starving hungry.
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#11 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2016 - 02:00 AM

Yesterday/today turned into a 20 hour marathon shift changing out head drive pulley bearings. 10" shaft. Big monster housings. Lots to remove to even get to the bearings.

Left house at 5 am. Took forever to get to the mine. Got underground stated working. At 130 we were ready to put the new bearings on. Oh....wrong parts were delivered. We were 8 miles from the elevator, no ride out. Had to make calls. 4 hours later we get the bearing delivered to us. Encountered more problems putting it together. Finally at 10 its all back together just like we found it but with new bearings. Wait 2 hours for a ride out.

Oh and the great part you may ask. This particular area seems to make a great deal of water. Normally this isn't a problem as there is a sump between the driver and transfer. But the water I pumped on the belt and carried away with the coal. No belt no pump. Water started at around ankle deep by the end of the shift it was just about over my 10" boots. Maybe it got deeper because we set the bearing on fire trying to cut it off and blew the fire suppression over the belt....

Cold wet and I never learn...only packed 2 sandwiches and a bag of chips


I am beat.

Edited by toomanytoys84, January 24, 2016 - 02:04 AM.

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#12 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted January 24, 2016 - 11:37 AM

I used to work at Reliance electric (a janitor but I worked there) and I was always impressed by the size of some of those motors. One night we heard what sounded like a bomb going off in the truck loading area. Guy dropped a huge motor because he didn't lift it properly and wouldn't listen to anyone telling him he was wrong. He was escorted off the property immediately. If I remember correctly it was about a $200K motor. Not only was the motor damaged, but the floor had to be repaired. 


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