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#1 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 03:27 PM

Last 2 years I've been bugged with small white butterflies, or moths, whatever you call them pests.  They would not leave my cabbage or brussel sprouts alone.  They laid their eggs which turned into slimy, nasty little worms.  Anyone know exactly what they are and what can I use to kill every darn one that comes within swatting distance of my garden?

 

 


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#2 ol' stonebreaker ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 04:10 PM

  Linda ordered some fine plastic mesh that's supposed to be sunlight resistant called "enviromesh". I built some frames for it of 3/4" PVC pipe. I used self drilling screws to fasten all the pipe joints and to attach the mesh to the frames along w/ zip ties. I also used alum window screen to close the ends. We didn't find a single worm in our broccoli last yr. Here's some pics of it.

 

 broccoli cage down (Small) (2) (Small).JPG cage and screen for broccoli (Small).JPG

 

   I used clothespins to close the vertical ends.

                                    Mike
 


Edited by ol' stonebreaker, January 15, 2016 - 04:11 PM.

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#3 Little Irish Men ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 04:12 PM

Exactly what they are ?  little white butterflies..  To kill them .....  . How about 12-12-12 

 

 

Patrick.


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#4 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 04:43 PM

Check out an insecticide called Tempo.  I have used it for years on all kinds of insect control, in the garden, flowers, around the house, in the house.  Where ever you want to use it, it is a very safe product.


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#5 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 08:47 PM

This is the white cabbage butterfly. When I was young we would use a dust that wasn't too toxic, but I don't see it anymore. The trouble with insecticide is it kills everything. Another choice is Bt. For those who don't know what it is;

"Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is actually a naturally occurring bacterium, common in some soils, that causes disease in certain insects, most notably leaf and needle feeding caterpillars. It was first discovered in the early 1900s. The French were the first to advocate using Bt in the garden and by the 1960s, Bacillus thuringiensis products were available on the open market and were readily embraced by the organic gardening community."
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#6 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 12:19 AM

As dumb as it sounds and as silly as you'll feel using it, a butterfly net works wonders.  At first you don't think it's making a difference, but after a couple of days the number of butterflies is greatly reduced. If it has been dry, making a puddle will draw them, and they are more easily caught when they are on the ground getting a drink--- they seem to be drawn to the dissolved mineral salts. Good old potato beetle powder also works if you are not adverse to using insecticide, and it is easily washed off of cabbages etc.


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#7 skyrydr2 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 06:46 AM

Barn swallows love them, as do purple martins as well , they kept them all off my cabbage products last year at my big garden. But you need wide open spaces for them, my home garden wasn't so lucky.. BT was my choice, along with a white powdered material I dusted on them, that didn't seem to work on cabbage, but did on broccoli ? Diatim.....something earth , its good for the chickens too.
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#8 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 01:57 PM

Diatomaceous earth, good for controlling slugs and all sorts of creepy crawlies. They either crawl over or ingest it and it is so microscopically sharp it cuts them up and they dehydrate to death. Doesn't bother hens, calves, etc. and can be used in all sorts of situations around the farm/yard to control munching insects.
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#9 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2016 - 10:23 PM

I have Tempo but thought it was bad on food items?  Guess I could use it and wash the heck out of everything.  DE, never thought of that.  I put a dab in each nest and spread it on the floor each time I change out the straw, twice a year in the coup.  I guess I will try a little bit of both this year.  I should have sprayed tempo on my apple trees.  Darn bees moved in and destroyed all the apples in one weekend.  Don't ask how happy that made me... grrrrr.... had no apple juice to make hard cider this year.... grrrrr

 

I thought about the fine mesh, but I don't think it would work for me.  6 outa 7 days a week where I have my garden is so windy if it is not nailed down, it is gone!  I use tomato cages on most my plants to keep the wind from laying them down.  Even then, I have to anchor them down to stop them from blowing over.  I have been giving serious thought about building some raised beds in the garden with poles buried deep so I could do this with netting but, with the wind, got my doubts.  Last 2 years, if it was not caged and over a foot tall, it got bent over/broke/damaged, etc.  Should see my corn, funniest looking things u ever saw... LOL  Ever see corn growing sideways?


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#10 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 06:31 AM

I've been reading this thread and hope some  of the suggestions  will work for me . I'm getting tired of growing plants to feed the bugs lol 


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#11 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 08:14 AM


I thought about the fine mesh, but I don't think it would work for me. 6 outa 7 days a week where I have my garden is so windy if it is not nailed down, it is gone! I use tomato cages on most my plants to keep the wind from laying them down. Even then, I have to anchor them down to stop them from blowing over. I have been giving serious thought about building some raised beds in the garden with poles buried deep so I could do this with netting but, with the wind, got my doubts. Last 2 years, if it was not caged and over a foot tall, it got bent over/broke/damaged, etc. Should see my corn, funniest looking things u ever saw... LOL Ever see corn growing sideways?


How do your bugs get around, hitchhiking?
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#12 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted January 21, 2016 - 07:51 PM

How do your bugs get around, hitchhiking?

 

 

 

What gets me is even when it is so windy ya can't hardly stand up straight, the )*&(*Y skeeters will still find and hammer the heck out of ya. 



#13 Sam OFFLINE  

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Posted February 22, 2016 - 03:23 PM

If you want to lay off the chemicals you might want to try some onions or garlic as companion plants, apparently cabbage fly dont like being near it.


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#14 holdenboy1960 OFFLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2016 - 11:11 AM

ash from your wood stove also helps keep some bugs & such from your veggies when sprinkled over the crops  


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#15 toppop52 ONLINE  

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Posted February 26, 2016 - 04:44 PM

This is the white cabbage butterfly. When I was young we would use a dust that wasn't too toxic, but I don't see it anymore. The trouble with insecticide is it kills everything. Another choice is Bt. For those who don't know what it is;

"Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is actually a naturally occurring bacterium, common in some soils, that causes disease in certain insects, most notably leaf and needle feeding caterpillars. It was first discovered in the early 1900s. The French were the first to advocate using Bt in the garden and by the 1960s, Bacillus thuringiensis products were available on the open market and were readily embraced by the organic gardening community."

We used Sevin dust on them, kills them and they don't come back as long as you reapply after heavy rains.


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