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2WD VS 4WD


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#16 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted January 03, 2016 - 10:39 PM

Thanks for everyone's impute, I will probably go with a 4wd since that's all the LS dealer can get me. It will probably be handier then what I think, I was just hoping to save a little $$$$.

The 4wd would be nice in the snow, well......... that is if we ever get snow, it has just been rain and ice storms so far this winter.


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#17 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted January 03, 2016 - 11:03 PM

I kind of recall an earlier thread where you mentioned growing wheat? For most tilling (plowing, discing etc) the tractor will be light on the front end and 4wd will be of little use. Most tilling and harvesting should also be done when the ground is relatively dry, so again 4wd is not a big deal. If you are working in wet/muddy or slippery conditions, especially with heavy loads in the loader 4wd will be a big benefit.

 

For the horse power rating you are looking at and your intended use though, I would still be looking at something older. In the later 60's and early 70's 50 to 60 hp was considered a fairly large farm tractor and they were made with enough weight for tilling. These days most farmers would laugh at the idea of tilling with a tractor that "small". The newer tractors in that hp range are really not intended for "field" work, more "yard" work like moving stuff with the loader (manure, silage, round bales). mowing with a bush hog. blowing snow etc. Think of it like this, how does a 10hp GT from the late 60's to ealy 70's compare to a new 10hp "gt" (riding lawnmower)? Most farms have gotten bigger and guys are trying to till/plant/harvest more acres in the same amount of time, so the machines and implements have gotten bigger as well. You mentioned (if I remember right) farming on a scale similar to what was done back in the 60's to 70's. I think you will find that older well maintained equipment will not only cost less, but perform better than most of the new stuff in the same size range.

 

Jim

 

Good memory, I am starting a small farm for growing organic old fashion varieties of grain like wheat, corn and ect. I will be pulling a plow, disk, spring tooth, cultivator, planters and who knows what else I decide to tie to the back of it.

I already have some older tractors, I would like to get something new so I can have a nice tight cab and not have any worries (although the old tractors are probably more reliable lol :rolling: ). All the old tractors I have are half worn out, loud, cabless and rattly. A friend of mine (bigger farmer) has a old (70's no cab) 130hp John Deere and he uses it to do hundreds of acres of hay, that one tractor does all the swathing, raking and baling. Although he has 2 new JD's (one 80hp and the other is 150hp), he still prefers the old JD with the umbrella.

 

I will use my other older tractors, but this new one will be my long use tractor, something I'm in all day for a couple weeks, something I can kick on the A/C, radio and just sit back and enjoy the ride! :thumbs:


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#18 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted January 03, 2016 - 11:04 PM

Your choice. Do as you see fit. But I recommend a cab...

 

There is no way I am getting anything without a cab, that is one of the reasons on why I want a new tractor lol.

Thanks


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#19 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted January 03, 2016 - 11:08 PM

Test drive them all, pick the one that your butt fits in best and operates the way you expect from a tractor. If you can find just one situation you might need 4wd, get 4wd. If you have never needed 4wd, you may be fine. But any chance you might say "I wish I had gotten it with..." you better get it with it.

 

 

I haven't test driven anything yet, I'm saving that for when the loans come through, I hated to go to the dealer and get his hopes up just not to buy one.

I wrote the FSA about their beginning farmer loans today hoping to get the ball rolling. I am hoping to get my land and tractor this spring/summer so I have time to prepare it for wheat in the fall.

 

Don't worry, I will make sure my rear fits perfect in the seat! as soon as that tractor is mine, I'm not going to be leaving the seat for a long time! :rolling:


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#20 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted February 01, 2016 - 04:43 PM

Just remember a lot of farmers went broke riding in their air conditioned cab !  Tractor as well as trucks.  If your even in the middle fo bailing hay or doing what ever and the AC quits, your broke down. Period.  You cannot get enough air in that cab with the way the windows are any more. 
Can't open the door either as the first gopher mound you find the door will be on the ground.  Your worried about spending extra to get front wheel assist and you want a cab  ? ? ? ? My opinion on the matter but I would gladly trade a cab for FWA.






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