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Custom work for gardens.


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#1 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2016 - 11:01 PM

been thinking about an idea I have. Custom work on garden tractors. I would like to know what kind of pricing sounds reasonable. I'm not sure whether to go by hour or by square foot.

Services would be plowing disking and cultivating. Not sure about harvesting or planting yet.

Suggestions are appreciated
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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2016 - 11:10 PM

You need to do a bit of research. What permits and insurance are required? What is the local customary rates. How much do you want to invest in this (time and money)? What other services will you have available? It could be a good part time business in the spring and fall. Providing compost will elevate your level of service. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 zippy1 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2016 - 12:50 AM

I used to do this for friends and family, so insurance wasn't an issue, but I would think you'd want to cover your butt in the event something went wrong. Whether your doing or not. Just to be safe.

I did the work by the hour. Some gardens are small but take as much time as a larger one because you're constantly turning your equipment around re-positioning...

You will have to figure in traveling time and fuel in the haul vehicle as well as the wear and fuel in the tractor. Would suck doing a persons garden for a $20 bill and a repair that cost a couple hundred. I know it's the price of the game we play, but just sayin"... And what would the insurance cost for such a venture? All things you'll need to check into.

Now i just stick to my own work. Personally I don't think you can charge enough, but the potential client will think otherwise...


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#4 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2016 - 08:19 AM

If you have a local lawn service company, check with them and you might work something out with them.  They do the lawn work and you do the garden work.  Work like a sub contractor by the hour.  Personally I would not start a tractor for less than $20 an hour.


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#5 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 02, 2016 - 11:10 AM

If you have a local lawn service company, check with them and you might work something out with them. They do the lawn work and you do the garden work. Work like a sub contractor by the hour. Personally I would not start a tractor for less than $20 an hour.


Probably could talk to my good friends uncle about that. Not sure how he'd feel about hiring a young guy like me (young meaning under the age of 18)
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#6 FrozenInTime OFFLINE  

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Posted January 11, 2016 - 10:56 PM

Good luck with it.  Several guys in local towns here advertise roto tiller work.  The only think I would worry about is your age, insurance might not like that I'm guessing, working around equipment.  You might be ok depending on your state.  Here, if your under 16, you can't operate equipment.


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#7 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 12, 2016 - 09:06 PM

Good luck with it. Several guys in local towns here advertise roto tiller work. The only think I would worry about is your age, insurance might not like that I'm guessing, working around equipment. You might be ok depending on your state. Here, if your under 16, you can't operate equipment.


I'm in Canada. Not sure what the rules are. I'll go have a look...
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#8 oldedeeres OFFLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 09:20 AM

Good on you for coming up with the idea! It really burns me when someone like you with initiative and ambition is held back by worries about insurance and interference from the "powers that be". Saw in the paper late last summer where three little girls had to close down their card-table lemonade stand because they didn't have a food safety licence. I know that's carrying things a bit too far, but really?
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#9 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 15, 2016 - 11:10 AM

I'm decent about keeping things quiet... Just take the back roads and work with cash... Hard to trace right?
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#10 BTS OFFLINE  

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Posted January 16, 2016 - 11:50 PM

Here are a couple apps you might want to look into, I had seen these in Garden Gate magazine and thought they might come in handy for what you want to do.

Good luck!

Attached Thumbnails

  • Pictures of Green house mag 010.jpg
  • Pictures of Green house mag 011.jpg


#11 poncho62 OFFLINE  

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Posted January 17, 2016 - 08:16 AM

I did plowing and rototilling for a few people. I advertised in Kijiji. No insurance or such was involved, but I would scope out the job before hand. I only had one complaint. I did a job when the lady wasnt home and she gave me crap for hitting some of her tulip bulbs. 

I charged $60 per hr, you can get a lot done in an hour. Most jobs took about an hour. If they wanted me to travel more than 20 km, I would charge extra for gas. 

 

PICT0004Small.jpg


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#12 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 10:43 AM

Here are a couple apps you might want to look into, I had seen these in Garden Gate magazine and thought they might come in handy for what you want to do.
Good luck!


I think you guys give better answers. And I can ask questions about certain things...

#13 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 02:58 PM

At first I wanted to say "save yourself the trouble & don't do it" on both this possible project and selling sweet corn.  But then Lorna's words (oldedeeres) rang loud.  Who are we to discourage you!  Some do these type things and do well.  Others don't.   But either way, you'll learn a lot and likely have some fun.  Some people may not be accepting of your young age, but many might be the opposite and want to hire you for garden work because you're young and want to work.  


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#14 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 04:58 PM

I would suggest starting out small. Maybe only do it for people you know for the first year.
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#15 Greasy6020 ONLINE  

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Posted January 18, 2016 - 09:40 PM

I would suggest starting out small. Maybe only do it for people you know for the first year.


Good plan. Just my friend and grandpa and dad.
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