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#16 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 04:11 AM

Yup east coast for sure, Fitchburg MA to be persise. They were made by the Simonds Saw and Steel company way back when... I work for them ;-) , of coarse they sold off or discontinued all the good stuff many moons ago, now they only make bandsaw blade and giant circular saw teeth and shanks there now. Files are made in Honduras, saw disc or blades are in Michigan, and machinery is made in Portland Oregon.
At one time we made it all in Fitchburg, with well over 3000 employees, now..... Maybe 80... And the bi-metal and carbide bandsaw may be going to japan.......

#17 karel OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 04:39 AM

Once apon a million years ago I ment humphry bogarts cusin" Rene bogart" he was a professional musical saw player, every big band back in the 20's and 30's had one, this guy had a talent I never knew excisted.and the sound the saw produced was mezmoriseingly haunting. it was a saw made by only one company do you know of them?


Edited by karl, December 31, 2015 - 04:39 AM.

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#18 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 08:15 AM

I have clean a lot of steel using an angle grinder with a wire brush.

Using an angle grinder with a a wire brush - it burnish the steel, does not grind way the steel.

You have to have a light touch.  Remember you are only to remove the rust.

Only work one direction, also work away from the area that you cleaned.

 

Using a solid brass brush works great on aluminum,  which should also work on saws.

Refurbishing an old hand saw is a lot different than cleaning up old iron.  Quickest way to ruin a hand saw is to put an angle grinder to it.  If your cleaning it up for a painting, fine to use that angle grinder as you will cover it all up any way.  A brass brush will work in some cases.  White vinegar, a brush and lot of hand work with plenty of water and fine grade wet or dry finishing paper.  It can take 2 to 3 hours to clean up the blade.

 

Ever wonder why the tote on the real old hand saws had a small opening for the fingers?  Because you only need room for three fingers.  The index finger is supposed to point down the blade of the saw to guide it.

 

If you come up with an old Disston and want it identified send me PM with a photo of the left side of the tote and the blade and will see what I can do.


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#19 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 08:25 AM

Yup east coast for sure, Fitchburg MA to be persise. They were made by the Simonds Saw and Steel company way back when... I work for them ;-) , of coarse they sold off or discontinued all the good stuff many moons ago, now they only make bandsaw blade and giant circular saw teeth and shanks there now. Files are made in Honduras, saw disc or blades are in Michigan, and machinery is made in Portland Oregon.
At one time we made it all in Fitchburg, with well over 3000 employees, now..... Maybe 80... And the bi-metal and carbide bandsaw may be going to japan.......

Simonds was a completely different company than Disston.  Disston was in Philadelphia, PA..  Henry Disston was from Sweden where he learned the saw trade.   Company was eventually sold to to Sandvich (sp) steel work in Sweden.



#20 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 08:59 AM

Saw sharpening is a lost art. I still sharpen my hand saws by hand with a vise and hand set. We can't find anyone local here anymore that sharpens circular saws. Most of us have carbide tipped blades and no one does this any more. Nice collection of saws. I have about 9 and they are all older than heck. Thanks.        Roger.

One thing to watch when you sharpen by hand is keeping the cutting edge straight.  Many time hand sharpening will work and curve in the teeth due to more file strokes to get the most used part sharp.  Takes a machine to get that back out again.  Some will get so bad that it is better to run them through the re-toother a couple times and start over again.

 

Carbide blades takes a special machine and diamond cutting wheels.  Diamond wheels start at around $125 each.  Some cheap carbide blades cannot be sharpened due to the irregularities in tooth spacing and and distance from dead center.  The machines can cost as much as your house for the computer controlled units.  Mine is a hand operated and got it real cheap but had to drive 300 miles to get it.


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#21 hamman OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 10:00 AM

My uncle sharpened hand saws. He had a small side business doing that. He used to sharpen drill bits also. Some by hand some on a hand cranked grinder. He worked for National Twist Drill for 30 years. He showed me how to sharpen hand saws and circular saws. I bought a Foley Bell Saw circular sharpener and did those for a while. I was never able to do the carbide ones.  The last guy we had here doing saws was over 80 years old and finally said he had enough. He moved and left the machines to his kids who sold them for scrap. ( or so the story goes) anyway it was a shame to see him stop. Quick and reliable service and he always stood behind his work.                                                                                                                                                                                                        Roger


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#22 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 11:36 AM

Once apon a million years ago I ment humphry bogarts cusin" Rene bogart" he was a professional musical saw player, every big band back in the 20's and 30's had one, this guy had a talent I never knew excisted.and the sound the saw produced was mezmoriseingly haunting. it was a saw made by only one company do you know of them?

When I was a boy there was an evangelist who traveled all over the mid-west last name Hegstrom.
He played the saw with a violin bow. It had a sound something like a harp. Beautiful in the hands of someone with talent.
He said his saw was off a rack in a hardware store, and that any good saw could be played.
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#23 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 11:57 AM

I have never tried to play a saw but have heard of it being done.  I did play spoon a long time ago.  Grandpa showed me how to do that.I think it is probably the quality of the steel that went into the saw that made the difference, just taking a cheep wrench and good quality one, they will have a different sound when struck against a steel object.


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#24 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 02:38 PM

Found some old saws of dads. I wanted to look at them after reading your post. These saws are never used by me. I am not into carpentry. Any way, found these saws, here are some pictures.

Sorry if not right side up, and the last saw may not be a Disston.

One of them had writing on the metal saw.


Noel

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#25 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 02:43 PM

Picture of the one with writing on the metal saw.

Noel

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#26 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 08:47 PM

The saw with the etching on the side "Rancher" is a Disston saw that was made for the hardware store line Disston produced.  It was a cheaper line of saw and had the "Warranted Superior " medallion in place of the Disston Medallion.  Other smaller saw companies bought their medallions from Disston as it was cheaper to buy from them in place of making their own.

 

The top saw in the first and second pic, and the tote of the same saw in the 6th pic, might be a Disston saw but I don't think so.  The medallion is not clear enough to be sure but it appears to read   DISSTON   PHILDA.  The wheat carving is not correct nor the straight back blade for  Disston saws using that style of tote.  Disston saw with that style of 5 bolt tote had skew backs, not straight backs.  However the medallion bolt could have been changed some time.  The wheat carving does not go to the lower part of the tote far enough for a Disston.  Disston changed from the eagle center on the medallion to the Keystone center around the mid 1860's. 


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#27 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 31, 2015 - 08:50 PM

Another thing I just noticed, the medallion on the quality Disston saws was let in or recessed into the tote.  The hardware store line the medallion was on top of the wood.


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#28 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted January 01, 2016 - 12:09 AM

I'd love to have my grandfathers hand saws sharpened up for use. Not sure what brands they are but he used them as a carpenter.
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