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Cleanest Carpet in The Country


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#1 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 08:56 AM

Got the shores done yesterday morning and went to shut the corn stove down so I could clean it.  Noticed a fairly large wet spot on the carpet and started looking.  Found water coming in between the floor and the block wall right at the joint where they poured the floor in two different days.  Followed the joint to the center of the basement and started spreading.  Got the 5 gal vac out and started sucking up water.  After about 10 dumps the vac quit. 

 

Went to the wood shop and got the Sear 16 gallon unit and really went after it then - for about 8 or 10 tubs full then it started to really slow down and stopped.  $170 later back at it again with a new 18 gallon shop vac.  It finally slowed down enough I felt I could leave it around 10pm.  6 this morning had more carpet soaked but not much coming in any more.  2 tubs later got caught up with it again.  Will probably spend most of the day drying out carpet with 2 fans, the shop vac and dehumidifier.  That sump pump sure got a work out.

 

The ground was saturated before we got this last 3" of rain so it had to go some place.  Found a week spot in the sealer they put on when the basement was put in 3 years ago.  Wish I would have insisted on tile around the footing now.  Lot of ground slope, over 4 ft between opposite corners of the house so figured would not need it.  WRONG !  At least I got the basement carpet cleaned.  Worst part is a pool table sits right in the middle of the largest piece of carpet.  No place to move it to that would do any good.


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#2 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 09:07 AM

Sorry to hear of that. They have flood warnings out all over the state.

#3 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 09:27 AM

I would think the contractor would have insisted on the drain tile at the footing!



#4 Jazz ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 10:42 AM

I saw a similar problem where water was entering basement on corner of house. The temporary solution was laying a tarp along edge of house about 10' wide and about 20' down either side of house. What it did was stop ground water in that area.  Not sure if that would work for you.  

 

I poured foundations in Port Elgin Ontario for a winter, about 30 foundations.  Floors were always poured in one day. I was 16 and wheel barrow cement all day because cement truck never had more than a 9' chute. Also had to wheel some of the foundation walls,,running across a 2x10 with 400lbs in a wheel barrow...no wonder i'm in feet up mode...


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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 11:01 AM

Sorry to hear this! Been there before!



#6 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 11:50 AM

I saw a similar problem where water was entering basement on corner of house. The temporary solution was laying a tarp along edge of house about 10' wide and about 20' down either side of house. What it did was stop ground water in that area.  Not sure if that would work for you.  

 

I poured foundations in Port Elgin Ontario for a winter, about 30 foundations.  Floors were always poured in one day. I was 16 and wheel barrow cement all day because cement truck never had more than a 9' chute. Also had to wheel some of the foundation walls,,running across a 2x10 with 400lbs in a wheel barrow...no wonder i'm in feet up mode...

Going to put a tile in when it dries up enough so I can get it in half way right with fall.  Back in the late 50's there was no such thing as ready mix.  We shoveled in the sand, cement and bucket of water.  Then, like you said wheeled it to where we needed it.  Would rotate every hour between the hand screed, wheeling or the sand & cement pile.

 

This guy that did my basement floor was hired by the block layer. Block layer did a great job, well reinforced, blocks filled every 6' and all.  Floor guy was a couple older guys and would only do it 1/2 at a time.  Real easy pour, 24'X 52', tapered 2" from one end to the sump at the other, 1" of fall from the outside to the center.  No floor drains.  Has 3 beam support post down the center.  Walk out door in one corner on the sump end.   I had the pit tile set with 1" fall from the door to the sump.

When he got that far on the floor pour he pulled the tile up to fit his floor grade and ended up with the door being 1.5" lower than the sump.  Lot of high and low spots along the walls.  Lot of rough concrete along the walls as all he used was a power trowel.  When I jumped about that stuff he said I was to damn particular.  That cost him $2K right off the bat.  Contractor was not happy but I wasn't either.  Told him he had his choice, 2K deduction or tear it out and do it over.

When I was working construction it was all block walls.  The outside was back plastered with masonry cement and then the tar sealer was applied over that.  Every floor had to drain towards the drain - no questions asked, just do it.  Workmanship is a thing of the past any more.  All they want to do is show up and collect the big bucks at the end of the day.


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#7 lyall OFFLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 12:03 PM

chieffan sorry about your water problem.

we got around 6.5" of rain here in State Center.  My sump pump was running for several hours.  I have a 65' deep well 10' from the house.  When I had the house build in '91 with a wood basement I had them put a 4" line from the well to the sump pump.  I use the well the water the yard and garden and suck water out of the well when water come thru the pipe to the sump pump.  I remove the jet pump for the winter, because it is above ground.  I had to hook back up to get the water table back down.  this is the first time I had to put the jet pump before the spring rains.  I will had to remove my jet pump after the water table is back down to normal again, so it does not freeze.

 

A lot of people around around here that use to have wells that they used until the rural water can in. They removed their well pumps and now they are getting water in their basements.  Before they switch to rural water they said that they never had water in their basements.


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#8 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 12:58 PM

I saw on the news where you guys were really getting hammered with rain.  I have a shallow well, about 35' that is about 60' from the house and down grade.  Only use a hand pump for watering flowers, etc.  More of a novelty than anything.  Haven't checked to see how it is since all the rain this year but it has to be full.  Those wood basements are really nice if they are put in nice.  We had one in Greenfield, first one in the area back in about 85 or 86.  Really liked it, had walk out basement and the drain lines run out the back to a creek about 400 yds away.  Never had any water problems with it.  Floating floor and the foundation was set on pea gravel.  12" of pea gravel along the wall around the outside.  Had a real problem getting FHA to approve it for the loan back then.

 

I think I am down to just getting the carpet dry now.  No water coming in at this point but it keep seeping up from below the floor.  Weight of the floor keeps pushing it up a little.  About every hour I run the vac over the carpet.  About all I can do at this point.  Have fans running, corn stove is going as is the dehumidifier.  68° so good drying condition.  Will take a couple days but will get it but sure don't want any more darn rain.  If you see Daryl tell him I said Hi.  Haven't got anywhere close or would stop in.


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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 07:07 PM

Has the ground settled where thy backfilled along the wall? It is not uncommon to see it settle and let water pool along the wall, then seep in.
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#10 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 08:11 PM

Yes, the back fill has settled.  I did the back filling and left it about 2' high through the first winter to compensate for settling.  Still had to add some.  May have to add more yet but along that side I think a tile line would take care of it.  Only have one block above ground level as it is.  didn't want it higher as we did not want any more steeps than necessary as we get older.   Old age and steeps are not a good combination.  I can put a chair lift for the basement if I have to.  Put the steeps in with that in mind.  The biggest problem now is the amount of rain we have had this year.  About twice the usual amount. 
Was real hard to get 5 days in a row that was dry to get hay put up and that is unusual.



#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 15, 2015 - 10:35 PM

Yes, the back fill has settled.  I did the back filling and left it about 2' high through the first winter to compensate for settling.  Still had to add some.  May have to add more yet but along that side I think a tile line would take care of it.  Only have one block above ground level as it is.  didn't want it higher as we did not want any more steeps than necessary as we get older.   Old age and steeps are not a good combination.  I can put a chair lift for the basement if I have to.  Put the steeps in with that in mind.  The biggest problem now is the amount of rain we have had this year.  About twice the usual amount. 
Was real hard to get 5 days in a row that was dry to get hay put up and that is unusual.

Yes I can relate to that! When we lost the house to the flood in 2010 it was already 4 ft above ground level. If I rebuilt I would have to go 2 ft higher. And at 60 did not know if I could climbe that many steps in 10 yrs. Looked at 40 homes and 34 were split levels(more steps).

Finally found this place all on one level and bought it.






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