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46° and The Snow Blower Was In Use.


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#1 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 08:53 AM

In the Midwest when the gran elevators get full they pile the shelled corn on the ground.  Some of these piles can have several thousand bushels of corn.  With the mild weather and rain the ground is soft so to haul this grain off in trucks they have to keep the truck on solid ground - the street in this case.  The grain auger was set up at the edge of the pile which was a good 50' across and a couple hundred feet long.  To move the corn from the far side of the pile to the augur they had a New Holland tractor with a large front mount snow blower in operation.  It was blowing the corn from one side of the pile to the area where it could slide down into the augur.  Lot faster and cleaner than using an end loader.  They do not want any mud or dirt in with the corn and the blower was moving real slow and really cleaning it up good.  Wish I had a camera to get a photo of that.  So if any of you guy as getting antsy to use your snow thrower, just find a pile of shelled corn and have at it.


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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 09:07 AM

That might help clear the rust out of the insides too!


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#3 CRFarnsworth OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 09:09 AM

That's a common practice around here. 

But right now it is well covered.

They probably wouldn't " appreciate or understand"  my need to play in their corn pile!    Rick


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#4 larrybl ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 09:15 AM

Oh I soooo got to go find a corn pile now :)


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#5 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 09:25 AM

Oh I soooo got to go find a corn pile now :)

You might have better luck with that!


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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 09:35 AM

I live close to two grain e elevators, one borders my property and the other is 1 1/2 miles south of me.
A couple weeks Ago I was tempted to post a picture of the mountain of corn I could see from my yard at the one south of mine.
The trucks have been rolling and now I can barely see it.

Technology is a wonderful thing, not that long ago men loaded with a scoop shovel?
The elevator next to me has a new scale. Took the old one out last summer.
But I can remember Dad driving the 3/4 ton Studebaker onto a platform, locking the brakes,And chaining it down. Then they would lift one end of the platform and dump the shelled corn.

Edited by JD DANNELS, December 08, 2015 - 09:46 AM.

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#7 Leonard VanCamp ONLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 10:17 AM

I seen a farmer one time use a rear mounted blower to load a wagon with silage from a bunker, it was a lot faster then using a loader.


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#8 pharmer OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 12:16 PM

Grain elevators, piles of corn? What is this silly talk all about! (Lol)
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#9 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 02:22 PM

Grain elevators, piles of corn? What is this silly talk all about! (Lol)

 

 

But I can remember Dad driving the 3/4 ton Studebaker onto a platform, locking the brakes,And chaining it down. Then they would lift one end of the platform and dump the shelled corn.

The real big elevators and the soy bean oil plant in this area weigh the semi and then they drive to the unloading pit.  They tilt the entire semi to dump the gran out the back.  Not sure how they anchor the semi in place.  Soy bean plant you cannot get close to without a pass and drivers are not allowed out of the truck.

 

I have one of the wagon hoist like what your Dad was on sitting in front of my shop.  Handy for lifting about anything with a chain hoist on it.  Works great for skinning and cutting up deer.


Edited by chieffan, December 08, 2015 - 02:24 PM.


#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted December 08, 2015 - 05:39 PM

There is a soy-diesel plant about a mile NE of town. But I do not think they crush the beans.
I see a lot of truck running across 19th avenue with big tanks. Then a couple long trains made up of almost all tanker cars run through town every week.




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