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We finally made the move to southern Indiana.


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#136 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 12, 2016 - 09:22 AM

Both of those choices are too expensive for my budget.

 

 

Really? I redid almost my entire house plumbing using PEX and only spent around $500, that included the crimping tools, 2- 6 way copper manifolds, a valve on every supply circuit ( about 15 1/4 turn brass valves) and a washer/dryer hookup wall assembly. Not to mention, it's a lot easier to put together than PVC, very few 90* and no gluing :thumbs:


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#137 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 04:53 PM

Really? I redid almost my entire house plumbing using PEX and only spent around $500, that included the crimping tools, 2- 6 way copper manifolds, a valve on every supply circuit ( about 15 1/4 turn brass valves) and a washer/dryer hookup wall assembly. Not to mention, it's a lot easier to put together than PVC, very few 90* and no gluing :thumbs:

 

That is about what I estimated for our place.

 

We have a kitchen sink, dish washer, 2-bathroom sinks, cloths washer, utility sink, 1-shower, 1- tub/shower, 2-toilets, 3-cold outside faucets and 1-hot outside faucet.

That makes 20 separate water connections.   I figure I could combine the kitchen sink and dishwasher on the same lines and the outside faucets on the same lines so I could get by with a 16 outlet manifold.

 

16 gang manifold            $248.00

100' cold tube                     48.69

100" hot tube                      48.69

2-toilet adapter fittings        13.96

8-sink fittings                       52.84

4-tub & shower fittings         10.08

4- dish wash & laundry        10.08

4-outside faucet fittings       10.08

crimp tool                             48.63

------------------ total          $491.05

 

My estimate for 3/4 PVC was $301.15 so the PEX is close to $200 over budget.

We only have a certain amount of money available to build this house and have to stay tight to the budget.

However,  I may end up using the PEX anyway just because of how nice a water system it is.



#138 DougT ONLINE  

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Posted April 13, 2016 - 07:00 PM

you actually get heat in Canada  :poke:  :poke: :poke:  :D  

That's from 11:45 until 12:15.  :D


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#139 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 07:39 AM

That is about what I estimated for our place.

 

We have a kitchen sink, dish washer, 2-bathroom sinks, cloths washer, utility sink, 1-shower, 1- tub/shower, 2-toilets, 3-cold outside faucets and 1-hot outside faucet.

That makes 20 separate water connections.   I figure I could combine the kitchen sink and dishwasher on the same lines and the outside faucets on the same lines so I could get by with a 16 outlet manifold.

 

16 gang manifold            $248.00

100' cold tube                     48.69

100" hot tube                      48.69

2-toilet adapter fittings        13.96

8-sink fittings                       52.84

4-tub & shower fittings         10.08

4- dish wash & laundry        10.08

4-outside faucet fittings       10.08

crimp tool                             48.63

------------------ total          $491.05

 

My estimate for 3/4 PVC was $301.15 so the PEX is close to $200 over budget.

We only have a certain amount of money available to build this house and have to stay tight to the budget.

However,  I may end up using the PEX anyway just because of how nice a water system it is.

 

 

Gotcha, I understand the budget.... but PEX is so easy to work with and it won't get brittle like PVC can.

 

I used a 6 gang manifold for my cold, a 5 for the hot. A few circuits were together then I put separate valves on all those lines. Makes it so nice to be able to shut down a single line versus the whole house to work on something. You could always get 2 smaller manifolds and series them together, that would save some money, 2- 8's have to be much cheaper than a 16. You may need both crimper tools, I bought a 3/4 and 1/2" as main lines were 3/4 and everything else was 1/2".

I like the manifold too for the fact you no longer have the " flush the toilet and the shower get hot or cold" it keeps everything the same pressure.

 

Wished I could find my pics I took ,maybe I will take some more this weekend.


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#140 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted April 16, 2016 - 04:33 AM

I may be missing something. Why use a manifold?

Would it not be simpler to have one run down the center or side (one for hot; one for cold) and then just "T" off all the needed branches?

 

Love the porch! :thumbs:  :thumbs:


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#141 Sawdust OFFLINE  

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Posted April 16, 2016 - 06:17 AM

Pex is designed to make a simple fitting free run from the supply to the fixture from the manifold. You can eliminate the manifold but it requires using a lot if connections as using copper or pvc.

Edited by Sawdust, April 16, 2016 - 06:18 AM.

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#142 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 17, 2016 - 09:09 AM

The biggest cost on the Pex system is the manifold and I question why you really need that fancy manifold with a shutoff valve at each outlet.

The sinks, the dishwasher, the clothes washer and the toilets each have their own shutoff valves mounted on the wall at each unit.

So the tub and shower units and the outside faucets are the only places that don't have their own shutoff valves.

 

My question is, why do you need all those shutoff valves on the manifold.

Once the lines are all run and pressure tested, there isn't any reason to have to shut the water off at the manifold unless there is a leak in a line and that isn't very likely to happen.

 

In doing some more searching, I ran across an interesting alternative to the standard Pex manifold.   Using two of these would make the Pex system much more affordable.

edb575e8-2f51-4643-8955-ee13959992cc_145

 


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#143 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 17, 2016 - 10:15 AM

The last job we ran Pex on, we used that type of manifold, Ray! Just installed one shut off per manifold, one for hot & one for cold!


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#144 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 17, 2016 - 12:29 PM

We used that exact manifold on the cabin and my buddy's pole barn. Worked great.
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#145 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted April 17, 2016 - 01:40 PM

We have a fancy system to shut water off here. I go outside and throw the breaker on the well pump. Seems to work great. 


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#146 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 18, 2016 - 10:22 AM

You are correct Ray, probably redundant having a shutoff at the manifold for each circuit. I found it nice to be able to turn them off in basement all at one place, that was my preference. Almost every sink/faucet etc also has valve at the faucet for easy shut off right there so I can shut off either place. You could just use a manifold and then use your shutoffs at your faucets/supplies.

 

Also, I don't want to keep harping on it or try to change your mind, just presenting an alternative to your PVC after using this stuff. It's easy to use, affordable and very easy to add/change in the future and very durable.

 

Bmerf, I know living in an old farmhouse with a well pump with pressures between 30-50psi, just T'ing the lines causes a drop in pressure down the line. Using the larger manifold keeps the pressure equal even when another faucet is turned on or toilet flushed, no more getting that burn or freeze in the shower when someone flushes toilet or the washer kicks in.

 

This is what I used on mine, a 6port and also a 5 port. You can get a closed end, but I needed another 3/4 line to the back of the house so I got the open each end.

I've also seen guys on youtube make their own using copper T's and 90's using the plastic line, but a premade one is actually cheaper and less hassle.

 

http://www.ebay.com/...O#ht_1371wt_900

 

pex manifold.jpg


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#147 jdcrawler OFFLINE  

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Posted April 19, 2016 - 08:34 PM

Thanks for all the information.

I'm going to go with the Pex using the copper manifolds.

 

I have a question about them though.

They have a 3/4 inch inlet but all the outlets are 1/2 inch.  Do you get good water flow with just the 1/2 inch lines ?

On the PVC water systems that I've done, I've always run everything in 3/4 inch because the water flow was slow on 1/2 inch lines.



#148 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 20, 2016 - 04:52 AM

We ran into an issue with the 1/2" Pex. Water flow decreased a bunch. Last job, we ran 3/4" everywhere to keep the flow! 1/2" is really only about 3/8" at the fittings.


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#149 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted April 20, 2016 - 07:08 AM

Honestly Ray, I can not tell you. With our well pressures between 30 & 50 psi, we live with reduced flows anyway. If I do have restrictions, I wouldn't know due to the well. I can say I am happy with it and the ease of install and lower cost made it worth it to me. I started at 11 am one Saturday, tearing out all old copper lines and  had all my water back on by 5pm.

 

Here are my manifolds

20160418_161928.jpg

20160418_161939.jpg

 

Here is my recent laundry room plumbing.

laundry.jpg


Edited by TAHOE, April 20, 2016 - 07:11 AM.

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#150 Bmerf OFFLINE  

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Posted April 20, 2016 - 11:53 PM

Bmerf, I know living in an old farmhouse with a well pump with pressures between 30-50psi, just T'ing the lines causes a drop in pressure down the line. Using the larger manifold keeps the pressure equal even when another faucet is turned on or toilet flushed, no more getting that burn or freeze in the shower when someone flushes toilet or the washer kicks in.

 

I'm no plumber, but have been known to have "plumbers butt." :D

 

Wouldn't using 3/4" for the main run and 'T' off with 1/2" to the loads; Large area supplying small individual runs; act exactly like the manifold?

 

Is the cost of the 'T's more than running lines to all the individual loads? It just seems to me that many water lines running side by side would be a nightmare. Again I know nothing just trying to learn.

 

Three of us on a 30-50 psi well. Never really notice a supply issue unless the toilet in the same bathroom is flushed. Then again it is very seldom more than one of us is using water at the same time. 


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