Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

A Childhood Dream Realized...My Very Own T70ES

panzer t70

  • Please log in to reply
413 replies to this topic

#46 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,502 Thanks
  • 39,730 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted November 05, 2015 - 08:47 AM

That's cool!



#47 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 05, 2015 - 07:44 PM

So I've got a painter lined up. Anybody got the paint codes for the white and the turquoise?
  • panzersarebest said thank you

#48 Clint OFFLINE  

Clint

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8265
  • 412 Thanks
  • 295 posts
  • Location: Waterloo IL

Posted November 06, 2015 - 05:17 AM

Hondarider, I pulled these comments from different threads.

Sherwin Williams "Tantilizing Turquoise" US45277-00.

Dupont Spectramaster Green: its almost the same color as the Sherwin Williams tantalizing Turquoise. 

Rustoleum gloss Seafoam available at most Wal-Marts.

The paint I had mixed up for my second Panzer I got from NAPA using Sherwin Williams number 45277 in an acrylic enamel. 

Napa Part # DE1643 is $5.69 for a 12 oz spray can. It is manufactured by Duplicolor.
  • Alc and panzersarebest have said thanks

#49 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 06, 2015 - 10:31 AM

Thank you sir!  That's very helpful.  Someone had sent me a PM with an offer to provide the paint code, but now I can't find the message or remember the sender.  I hear the mind is the first thing to go.

 

Anyhow, I spoke to Jim at Dandy this morning and it looks like I'm going to score 4 new tires, new fenders, and a few other items.  The scary part, however, is that he indicated the engine is beyond obsolete.  Jim doesn't think I can get any parts for it whatsoever.  He said that "if it runs, don't open it".  I told him that its been a little weak for the past decade or two and the compression is a bit low.  He told me that I might look for a Snowbird S263 or 264 snowblower from the era as they used the same Briggs and Stratton motor.  Looks like I'm off to surf Craigslist. 

 

I'm a bit disappointed.  I was hoping to refresh the motor to as new condition for another 40 years of service.



#50 jabelman OFFLINE  

jabelman
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 38843
  • 1,472 Thanks
  • 1,134 posts
  • Location: nj

Posted November 06, 2015 - 10:37 AM

I just put a brand new briggs in mine. I made 2 simple motor mounts and I can turn back to stock in about 15 minutes nothing was altered on it

#51 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 06, 2015 - 10:51 AM

I just put a brand new briggs in mine. I made 2 simple motor mounts and I can turn back to stock in about 15 minutes nothing was altered on it

That sounds pretty good.  Any details on motor model?  Any pictures?  I'd really like to run this thing when I'm done; not relegate it to a showpiece in the corner of my garage. 



#52 jabelman OFFLINE  

jabelman
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 38843
  • 1,472 Thanks
  • 1,134 posts
  • Location: nj

Posted November 06, 2015 - 01:01 PM

briggs 800, it's a pull start mine isn't a electric model. reason I did it's going to plow snow and I just to hop on and go.
very reasonable priced engine too

#53 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 06, 2015 - 09:03 PM

Spent a couple hours in the garage tonight after dinner...taking things apart and listening to the radio.  I'm not sure that it gets much better than that...unless you're putting it back together.  I made some decent headway.

 

 

IMG_2674.JPG

 

IMG_2673.JPG


  • backwoods said thank you

#54 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 06, 2015 - 09:06 PM

I find its best to take copious notes...my memory might not be so great in 3 months when this thing goes back together.

IMG_2663.JPG
  • KennyP and backwoods have said thanks

#55 Clint OFFLINE  

Clint

    New Member

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8265
  • 412 Thanks
  • 295 posts
  • Location: Waterloo IL

Posted November 06, 2015 - 11:14 PM

I got to mow grass with one of the Panzers today at my girlfriend's house. It's a small yard and didn't take but 10 minutes. Anyway, if you need photos, run into problems, or need help just ask. Someone on here will post photos of all of the components in a timely manner. Keep up the good work and PLEASE keep us posted! Thanks, you're personally keeping this forum moving right now.

Here are a few pics of a Panzer my brother and I tore apart. My girlfriend wants a pink one, so tear down began. ​

 

Here is a link to my tear down. Progress has been slow.

 

http://gardentractor...nzer/page-4?hl= pink


Edited by Clint, November 06, 2015 - 11:15 PM.


#56 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 07, 2015 - 03:31 PM

As previously mentioned, my time in the garage is usually comprised of equal parts wrench turning, quiet contemplation of the universe, poor renditions of Journey power ballads, and waxing nostalgic over the "good ol' days"...all while consuming a beverage or two. In short, progress moves at a glacial pace; especially if I'm taking notes as I go.

Last night was heavily tilted towards nostalgia. As I tore down the tractor, piece by piece, I was considering the fact that this tractor had been repainted once already...at some point before I had ever seen it...somewhere in the first 20 years of its life. What resonated with me was that as I tore it down, I never discovered an unpainted piece in the original hue...not a bracket, sprocket, or panel. I imagined the old man disassembling the machine in the exact same way that I am...a ring of cigarette smoke circling his head while greasy hands removed each nut and bolt...mentally keeping track of where each one belongs without taking a single note...stacking pieces of sheet metal on the bench for painting. Ghosts of gear heads past accompanied me as I performed my tasks. This was confirmed by the almost supernatural absence of frozen or rusted hardware. All bolts, screws, and nuts came off without need for soaking, swearing, or hammer swinging. There has never been more compelling evidence of Divine Intervention than that. ( ;
  • KennyP, panzersarebest and MolonLabe have said thanks

#57 KennyP ONLINE  

KennyP

    FORDoholic

  • Super Moderator
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 2253
  • 28,502 Thanks
  • 39,730 posts
  • Location: Collinsville, Oklahoma

Posted November 07, 2015 - 07:15 PM

At times, I do things the same way!



#58 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 08, 2015 - 05:21 PM

So I was puttering around in the garage today and I noticed that the spark plug was loose. That explains why I wasn't feeling much in the way of compression when I turned it by hand. Then I vaguely remembered that when I parked it 10ish years ago...I had pulled the plug and put some oil in the cylinder to prevent seizing. So I tightened up the plug and the compression seemed to increase accordingly. I wondered if the old engine could possibly fire up after all these years. Surely the carb would be unserviceable after all these years. He points must be corroded and spent. The insulation on the spark plug wire must be cracked and brittle. Just for giggles, I grabbed a squirt bottle of gas, and then...


  • KennyP, backwoods, UncleWillie and 1 other said thanks

#59 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 08, 2015 - 08:16 PM

When I was in 4th or 5th grade, my mother, always there to support my aspirations, sweet talked an old man at a yard sale into selling me a mini-bike for the princely sum of $45. Big money for a kid from a neighborhood commonly referred to as "Shack Town". It was probably half of her take home pay for a week and I can't imagine how long she had to save for to get it. It had tiny tires, ape hanger bars, and a big sissy bar on the back. A motorcycle fanatic since pre-school, I was beyond excited. After a brief overview of the controls (a single foot brake and a real life twist throttle), I donned a helmet, demonstrated my abilities, and hit the streets; my first taste of freedom!

I tore around the neighborhood endlessly after that...close calls with cars...drag races with kids on bicycles...exploring other streets...dodging the police...constructing ramps with planks and cinder blocks...doing my best to be cool like Fonzie. Then one day...while drag racing Bruce Bailey on his 10 speed bike...my freedom came to an end. We were racing on one of the only paved streets in the neighborhood...following the basic rules of drag racing set forth in Grease...a clearly marked starting line...an agreed upon finish line...jockeying for optimum position...Bruce coiled like a spring...clocking his pedals to the position with maximum leverage...my Tecumseh engine revving just enough for dramatic effect, but not enough to engage the auto clutch. Then, with a wave of an arm from one of our wayward friends...we were off!

Bruce pulled out to an immediate lead...he was much bigger than me and a year or two older...but I cranked the throttle WFO and overcame him at the 20 foot mark. I was in a modified flat track tuck and really laying it on...RPMs rising steadily...but Bruce was staying with me...we were neck and neck...then...without warning...the engine revved wildly, the muffler popped like an M-80, and fire shot out of the side of the engine. Bruce, who was right next to me at that moment, reacted as if he had been shot and veered wildly into a neighbor's yard. My minibike coasted to a stop. It was still running so I gave it the gas, but nothing happened. The motor revved, but nothing happened. Clearly, I had killed it. Bruce declared victory.

Mr. D's house was only 3 houses a way so I pushed it down the street and up his driveway...cautiously hopeful that he might help me...I was nervous about asking him for help, but I was way more nervous about telling my mother that I had killed the minibike. The driveway was steep, the bike was heavy, and I may or may not have been crying...I was not in the best condition when I reached the garage door. The old man was working in the yard and never seemed happy to be interrupted, but he begrudgingly came over to check out the little machine. He started it up, revved the engine once or twice, looked at the rear end, and said "where's the chain?"

"Ummm...I don't know"

"Where were you when it stopped working?"

"Down there" I pointed

"Well, go get the chain. It must be in the street" he said gruffly

I wasn't exactly sure what he was talking about, but I had no desire to irritate him further so I left the bike and walked back down the street. Intensely searching for the chain, but not really knowing what that was. Sure enough, however, I found it...laying straight as an arrow in the middle of the street. I picked it up from the end like a snake and carried it back to the old man's house with my arm stretched out...hoping not to get grease on my clothes. At this point, I was sure that I was in big trouble...whatever this "chain" is supposed to do, it was broke and my 50 cent/week allowance wasn't going to get it fixed.

I presented it to the old man and he examined it closely...seemingly unconcerned that his hands were getting greasy...that ever-present cigarette butt dangling from his lip.

He declared "you need a new master link"

I stared at him blankly.

He looked at me for a few seconds...probably pondering my uselessness...then he grunted and disappeared into the garage. I could hear drawers opening and closing from within the dark confines of the garage while I stood there propping up the minibike which had no kickstand. A minute or two later, he emerged with a small piece of hardware and a pair of needlenose pliers. He crouched by the bike and set about routing the chain through a confusing mechanical maze that I couldn't even grasp. A minute later, he stood up, looked down in satisfaction, took a long drag on his cigarette, and pulled a rag from his pocket to wipe his greasy hands. I was stupefied.

"It's all set. Go try it."

I pulled the starter, turned the bike around, and twisted the throttle. To my utter amazement, it pulled away and off I went. Freedom was mine once again...and I wouldn't even have to tell my parents what happened. I rode away feeling nothing but gratitude and relief. Somehow, Mr. D. had exactly the right part to save the day...a "master link"...whatever that was...

I probably hadn't thought about that day in 30+ years...but as I sat in the garage the other night...sipping a beer and disassembling the Panzer...I spied a small part and it all came back to me in a rush...

IMG_2671a.jpg

Is it strange that I'm considering buying a pack of cigarettes?
  • Alc, KennyP, Clint and 4 others have said thanks

#60 Hondarider OFFLINE  

Hondarider
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 76653
  • 394 Thanks
  • 270 posts
  • Location: Adams, MA

Posted November 09, 2015 - 07:23 AM

Of course I still have it...but that's another project all together.

minibike.jpg
  • backwoods said thank you





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: panzer, t70

Top