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A Childhood Dream Realized...My Very Own T70ES

panzer t70

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#406 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 03:59 PM

All that effort and neither of the shops I stopped at today could help me. So much for my newfound enthusiasm. The block will probably oxidize before I find a shop willing to take on such a tiny job. I'll probably have to hit it with Simichrome just to maintain the finish.

#407 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 05:13 PM

And now for a brief literary detour into the world of motorcycles and my fondness for all things Bayerische Motoren Werke

 

Earlier today, while running through my daily routine of early morning Craigslist searches...things that I simply must own before I die...

 

Willys jeep...'66-'77 Bronco...Moto Guzzi...scrambler...Unimog...'72 Corvette...FJ40...Delta belt sander...BMW motorcycle...Triumph...Honda CT70...911...356...Meyers Manx..boxer..Jeep FC...airhead...HP2...Panzer...VW...air cooled...etc...

 

Anyhow, half way thru my search, I come across an ad for a BMW R50 motorcycle with the kind of backstory that resonates with my particular sense of petrol-based nostalgia.  Apparently, the bike in question has only had 2 owners since it was new in 1965; the current owner and his father.  He's not exactly confident that he's truly willing to part with it, but he is open to the idea of interesting trades or discussion with worthy stewards to carry on the role of moto-curator.  There's no sell price, but there is an eclectic list of possible trades; mostly European in nature.  For me, the bike hits all of the visual cues that I associate with vintage German machinery...the requisite Earles fork...knee pads on the tank...plunger rear suspension...bar end directionals...hinged rear fender...front and rear drums...rear view mirror below the bars...that familiar pin striping around the tank...and the blue/white roundel.  It's the exact profile I see in my head when you say BMW motorcycle.  Air cooled boxer twin with shaft drive and that weird transverse kick-starter.  The thing simply begs for a Steib sidecar to accompany it.  The more I looked at the pictures, the more in love I fall with this bike that may or may not even be for sale.  As you might imagine, the backstory really makes it for me.  Hell, even if it is for sale, I'm not sure that I can even afford it.

 

So, with my hat in hand, I pen a response to the hesitant seller.  I feel as thought I'm asking for his daughter's hand as I pen a short narrative about myself and why I think I would make a worthy suitor.  In the end, I simply provide a link to this thread; suggesting that everything he needs to know about me and my worthiness as the 3rd owner is encapsulated in these brief 27 pages.

 

With that, I hit send and resolved to leave it in the hands of fate.  What a great story that would make though.  I'd have to start a new thread on some vintage BMW forum.  That's an exciting prospect in itself.

 

Now back to our regularly scheduled Panzer programming...



#408 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 06:27 PM

You might call a local small engine shop and ask them if they know a machine shop that would be worthy of the pristine engine block. I am sure whoever works on it will have to clean their shop before you take it to them. 


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#409 classic ONLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 07:07 PM

I just bought this Neway valve seat cutter off of ebay for 80 bucks, used. I also picked up a Lisle cylinder hone for 90 bucks, new. Found that on ebay, too. With a good pair of calipers and a dial bore gauge, I can accurately hone an engine block .010 oversize. For me, it's worth having these tools around, and if I don't have a use for them in the future, I can always sell them and get my money back. Besides, it's a hobby, and it's fun to do the block prep work myself.

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#410 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 07:46 PM

I do like any excuse to buy a new tool or five.  However, I'm a little apprehensive about learning to hone a cylinder on this motor.  I'd be sad if I ruined it.  I should probably buy a dial bore gauge though...at least I could find out if the cylinder I have is true.  The B&S service manual does go into great detail for measuring and boring.  Maybe I'll do some reading and a bit of shopping.  I'd still prefer having a seasoned machinist knock it out if I find a shop.  I called a local small engine shop today and they couldn't help me at all.  It sounded like they treat motors like a throw away items to simply be replaced with yet another Chinese offering.



#411 classic ONLINE  

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Posted April 15, 2016 - 08:58 PM

You would be surprised at how easy these hones are to use. I mount the hone in my drill press and set the stops so that the stones protrude an inch past the top and bottom of the cylinder. It takes a while to hone a block oversize, but the hone actually straightens out the bore and makes it round again. I wouldn't be intimated at all, and the chance of ruining the block is almost nonexistent. Just measure with the bore gauge frequently throughout the process, and let the stones do the work. I have to admit that I was intimidated at first, but I was actually amazed at how easy the process was. In the pics below, you can see where the cylinder wears the most. It's mainly on the cylinder wall closest to the valves. This depression in the cylinder slowly disappears as you continue honing. Once the depression disappears, you measure the cylinder to see if you have to go to the next oversize piston.

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#412 Chris11 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 16, 2016 - 06:31 AM

I do like any excuse to buy a new tool or five.  However, I'm a little apprehensive about learning to hone a cylinder on this motor.  I'd be sad if I ruined it.  I should probably buy a dial bore gauge though...at least I could find out if the cylinder I have is true.  The B&S service manual does go into great detail for measuring and boring.  Maybe I'll do some reading and a bit of shopping.  I'd still prefer having a seasoned machinist knock it out if I find a shop.  I called a local small engine shop today and they couldn't help me at all.  It sounded like they treat motors like a throw away items to simply be replaced with yet another Chinese offering.

What do you want to do to it? I know a guy. lol


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#413 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted April 16, 2016 - 07:04 AM

Mostly, I just want to verify the current bore dimensions to determine if it meets the factory tolerances.  If not, I'd like to overbore it to match a set of oversized rings.  Of course, I should probably make sure that I can get oversized rings before doing the actual boring.  It would be silly to go .010" over and then find out that the only NOS rings available are +.020".  I should bite the bullet and just buy a set of bore gauges just to figure out where I am right now.  If I were to find out that the bore is still factory fresh after 50 years, I guess I could just throw in fresh rings and start reassembly.



#414 Chris11 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 17, 2016 - 07:15 AM

You can bring it to Lenny at Kingsley Machine in Nashua. Lenny does all my engine boring  honing and valve work.  number is 603 889 3844.







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