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A Childhood Dream Realized...My Very Own T70ES

panzer t70

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413 replies to this topic

#346 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted March 19, 2016 - 10:19 PM

you drilled them and got them test fitted on one page. They look great. lol


I know. Where is the major tool rebuild in the middle.
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#347 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2016 - 06:52 AM

I was tempted to go an and on at great length about the construction of the miniature paint booth that I put together last night, but I know that Chris gets impatient when I spend too much time on superfluous details. Instead, just the brackets...just the facts. It felt a little anticlimactic to me. No build-up...no showmanship...no artificial deadlines...no drama...no cartoonish facial hair. That's certainly not the way that Richard Rawlings or Paul Sr. would have handled it. Now I'll never get my own reality TV show.
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#348 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2016 - 07:09 AM

Incidentally, after hours of prep work, I dropped my collet holder off at the machine shop to get welded by the resident TIG guru. After I came out of the shop, I decide to Google "Bridgeport collet rack" just to see how much they cost. As it turns out, you can buy one on-line for $20-$25. The shop rate for the welder is probably $60-$75/hr and I had already sunk a couple hours into it myself.

. I probably would have paid him $50 to weld it instead of just throwing it away. I'd be putting money into the local economy and preserving a piece of vintage American hardware.

I still might fix it...maybe some J.B. Weld

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Wouldn't now be the most opportune and least financially effective time to purchase that TIG setup you glanced at?

And don't forget the tank...
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#349 Chris11 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2016 - 08:25 AM

I was tempted to go an and on at great length about the construction of the miniature paint booth that I put together last night, but I know that Chris gets impatient when I spend too much time on superfluous details. Instead, just the brackets...just the facts. It felt a little anticlimactic to me. No build-up...no showmanship...no artificial deadlines...no drama...no cartoonish facial hair. That's certainly not the way that Richard Rawlings or Paul Sr. would have handled it. Now I'll never get my own reality TV show.

But look how much faster your getting your tractor together. I hope you know I'm only having fun with you.



#350 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 20, 2016 - 01:03 PM

Wouldn't now be the most opportune and least financially effective time to purchase that TIG setup you glanced at?

And don't forget the tank...


You are clearly a guy with his head screwed on straight. That was the perfect time to buy the TIG welder that I've always dreamt of. I could have probably devoted another 10 pages to selection of the equipment, finding myself a Mr. Miyagi to mentor me, hours and days of practice, and then...that eventful day when I pull out my collet rack, rev up the welder, and discover that the rack was made from "pot" metal as it turns to a puddle on my workbench.
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#351 jpackard56 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 21, 2016 - 09:16 AM

You didn't imagine that I would overlook that, did you? I'm hurt.

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I made another spacer to make sure that the tool box wouldn't be deformed when everything gets tightened.

You have now found and solved another of the "apparent oversights"  I pm'd you sometime back about the wheel spacers I have been working up and now you will be ahead of me if there are anymore of these parts not matching quite right from original assembly. Thank you for sharing your work and especially your tenacity for attention to detail. Everybody tells me I worry too much, so it very comforting to see somebody else notices  some of the same "inconsistencies" I have come across...

Thanks again,

Great work and documentation of ALL your endeavors :thumbs:  :thumbs:  :thumbs: 


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#352 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 08:27 PM

Paint dried on my new brackets, and I'm just about ready to mount the tin over the rear differential. I really need to get the reassembly process in gear so I can stuff this thing in the corner of the garage until next winter.

First, time for a coating of super tenacious grease on the chain and sprocket. Everything is spinning smoothly and quietly.

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After that, I bolted the brackets onto the tin with nyloc nuts, just to be sure that they won't vibrate off in the future, and then I dropped it into place for what is hopefully the last time. I made sure to sign and date the bottom side of it...with a shout out to Mr. D.

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Unfortunately, I noticed that the mounting hole through the frame was a bit crooked. That would require some attention.

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I ended up drilling a new hole in the bottom side of the frame tube; 1/2" forward of the old one.

Edited by Hondarider, March 25, 2016 - 08:29 PM.

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#353 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 08:38 PM

With the front edges of the tin solidly mounted to the frame, I've been thinking about ways to positively secure the rear of the tin and prevent vibration in the future. I've gone to great lengths to prevent metal/metal contact, but the added clearance is a clear recipe for rattles.

After mocking up about 10 different material configurations, I settled on a piece of rubber edge protection and a block to lock the tin in place.

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I suspect that once the seat spring is tightened, this will be rock solid.

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#354 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 08:44 PM

It's time to stack the pieces and put some bolts in this thing. Seat spring + spacer + tool box.

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Once the 1/2" bolts were cranked down tight, I used a business card as a feeler gauge to see if the tool box is clear. Success!

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#355 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 08:49 PM

Now that the tin is in place, everything else is starting to come into focus. I was able to install the steering column and the my brand new steering wheel for the first time. It's actually starting to look like a tractor again.

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#356 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 08:55 PM

Right about now, I was grinding something and I had a blow-out on the new belt sander. That was an eye opener. It certainly makes me wonder why the manufacturer opted to put the power switch on the back of unit. These things spin FAST!

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#357 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 09:10 PM

Looking good.  You should b e proud of it. 



#358 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 09:43 PM

Time for a cautionary tale...

Earlier today, I was looking to play with my lathe for a bit. Unfortunately, I only have one 50A 230VAC whip in the garage to share between welder, lathe, and milling machine.

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This is generally not an issue because I can only use one at a time, but the down side is that the receptacle is very tight and it is very difficult to extract the power plug from the outlet. You have to be very careful not to inadvertently reach around the plug with your fingers and actually touch one of the hot pins. I usually have to stand on the box and work the plug carefully back and forth 50 times before I can extricate it.

Now, I should preface this next part with the fact that I have worked with electricity for 30 years. I have worked with voltages as high as 300,000V. I have constructed capacitor/reactor tank circuits capable of nearly infinite current at high AC voltages...EMF so thick that you could almost feel the lines of flux as you walked through the lab...operated a 2 story Ferranti capable of simulating lightning strike...performed UL, VDE, CSA, and CE electrical compliance testing...designed capacitors and phase converters...built my own stun guns...wired millions of dollars in machinery.

I might be a hack machinist and a mediocre engineer, but I know electricity inside and out.

That makes what happened today so silly.

As I mentioned above, I was attempting to unplug the milling machine so that I could plug in the lathe. I was a bit impatient and I couldn't position the receptacle in such a way to get any leverage...so I grabbed a big flat head screwdriver. Now, at this point, I knew exactly how this was going to turn out...I had no doubt in my mind...yet there I was...slipping the tip of the screwdriver between the plug and the receptacle to pry it out...making sure that I was only touching the handle...taking great care to keep the screwdriver tip against the neutral prong...promising myself that I wouldn't go anywhere near the red or black pins...struggling against the death grip that the receptacle had on the plug...getting frustrated...maybe wiggling the screw driver around a bit more than I should have...maybe attempting to go in from another angle...maybe threading the tip between the hot and the neutral...

Don't worry. I got this.

BOOM!

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#359 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 09:50 PM

I like to think of myself as "a man of action"...often incredibly stupid actions...but action nonetheless...no taking the safe route for me. I feel like HST would have been proud.
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#360 UncleWillie OFFLINE  

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Posted March 25, 2016 - 09:58 PM

A few years ago I got a call from a family to haul some scrap out of their property. One of the items was a central AC unit that was still attached to the house. They assured me that it was disconnected and I got my big pair of wire cutters and crawled on top of it to cut it lose. I had a big set of cable cutters and I wrapped them around the wiring and squeezed the handle. There was a bright flash and then darkness for a few seconds. It wasn't disconnected. My cable cutters had a 1/2 inch hole in them and I nearly peed my pants. I always check now. 


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