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A Childhood Dream Realized...My Very Own T70ES

panzer t70

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#241 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 01:22 PM

Box mounted...music playing on the radio...schematic updated...highlighter in my teeth...I finally got down to wiring this bad boy up

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After an hour of stripping, bending, torqueing, highlighting, swearing, and singing...

I think I might be ready for action..

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The 3 loose wires are for the whip from the switch. I'll wire nut those connections once the box is in the lathe.

#242 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 01:33 PM

Down on the floor to install the contactor panel and make the motor connections. I stuck the drawing to the door of the lathe and put on my headlight...

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I don't like to brag, but clearly I am bringing sexy back!

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Some cutting...some stripping...cold concrete on my bum...and a bit of gratuitous cursing nets respectable results...

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At this point, I'm getting awful anxious to plug it in and pull the trigger

#243 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 02:02 PM

OK...I'd love to tell you that I'm so supremely confident in my work that I threw caution to the wind, plugged in to 230VAC, and just slapped it into gear...but I've made more than my fair share of smoke over the past 30ish years in electronics and engineering...so I made a couple precautionary checks.

1. Using a DMM, I made sure that the GND pin on the plug was truly grounded and the chassis of the lathe wouldn't suddenly be hot when power was applied. Good.

2. Using the same DMM, I measured resistance across the 2 hot (flat) prongs of the plug. They should measure OPEN with no path for current between them. Good.

3. Then, with the DMM still connected to the hot (flat) prongs on the plug, I manually pushed the contactors in...one at a time. With the contactor in, the resistance between the hot prongs dropped to just a few ohms...as expected...as I was essentially measuring across the motor windings. GOOD

With those checks under my belt, I was feeling 90% confident...so I held my breath and plugged it into the power outlet...no smoke...no dimming of the lights...no screech of a cat hiding under the chair...GOOD

Now for the moment of truth...after something like 13 years since the lathe was last energized...I pulled the trigger...


Edited by Hondarider, February 14, 2016 - 07:33 PM.


#244 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 02:02 PM

https://youtu.be/ErQkRDN3_zM



#245 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 03:05 PM

Now the whole reason that my Panzer story was derailed by the South Bend lathe story was because I have a drive pulley that is all crapped up and I wanted to polish it.  Doing it by hand seemed like a lot of work with questionable potential for success and I couldn't find anyone willing to polish it up for me.  So I opted to drop everything and shift my focus to the lathe for a week or so.

 

Still basking in the success of my repower project, I thought I'd pop the pulley in there for a little test drive.

 

Here's the "before" condition...not exactly aesthetically pleasing...

 

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And here's what I have after about 15 minutes of turning with a Scotchbrite pad and then some Mother's aluminum polish on an old rag

 

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That's pretty good for only a few minutes of effort.  I'm going to go read a few things about polishing aluminum and then see if I can make it better.

 

 


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#246 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 04:53 PM

Half an hour in the machining business and I'm already bleeding.  LOL.  I can only assume this is why I spend all of my time relegated to a desk at work these days.  Some might call it a lack of situational awareness or adequate care...I like to think of it as a small surcharge levied against "men of action".

 

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Whatever it is...it usually makes for entertaining stories. ( :



#247 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 06:07 PM


an actual employee with subject matter expertise..

 

I think this is one reason for the demise of Radio Shack. No one knew anything about what they were selling. Same thing goes for most parts stores. Finding someone who knows their head from their butt is a rare thing. 

 

Half an hour in the machining business and I'm already bleeding.  LOL.  I can only assume this is why I spend all of my time relegated to a desk at work these days.  Some might call it a lack of situational awareness or adequate care...I like to think of it as a small surcharge levied against "men of action".

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3221.JPG

 

Whatever it is...it usually makes for entertaining stories. ( :

Fingers and spinny things are always a dangerous combination. Slap some super glue on it and get back to work. 

 

 

The pulley looks awesome. 



#248 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 13, 2016 - 06:28 PM

Yeah...the 3-jaw chuck got me.  I got a little too close while polishing the pulley and one of the jaws caught me.  I should have used a collet instead for a bit of extra clearance and no pointy spinny things to get me.  I suppose I'm a bit rusty...though I was never much more than a hack to begin with. 

 

Lucky for me...chicks dig scars!



#249 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 14, 2016 - 11:07 AM

-18 degrees F this morning...I'm not sure that the heater in the garage can even keep up with that kind of temperature...I better just sit here by the woodstove and surf the Internet today...shopping Craigslist for things I don't need, but simply must have...

 

ooh!  What's this?  A 230V/1ph motor for my Bridgeport...just an hour and a half away...I may need that!

 

Dave the Painter just scored himself a 1974 Honda CT-70.  I love those little bikes...especially when painted metallic tones...I wish I had some heartwarming story about a crotchety old man from my childhood that would justify me blowing several thousand dollars on the restoration of one of these things...

 

CT70.jpg


Edited by Hondarider, February 14, 2016 - 11:12 AM.

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#250 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2016 - 08:57 PM

OK...back to the business of rebuilding a Panzer.

 

My pulley shined up pretty good on the outside, but the inside was looking pretty rough so I decided to throw it in the sandblast cabinet.  There was still a bit of grease packed into the nooks and crannies so I hit it with brake cleaner and a toothbrush first.  The sandblaster does nice things for aluminum...

 

BEFORE

 

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AFTER

 

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Back on the lathe for a little clean up.  The pulley has some imperfections so I was thinking about turning off .005"-.010" to get a perfect surface, but in the end, I decided it was good enough.  I'd really hate to make a mistake and ruin it.  I'd probably have to buy an entire tractor just to get another pulley.

 

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A liberal coating of grease and I slid it back into the carrier.  I'll have to remember to pump it full of grease later.

 

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#251 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2016 - 09:12 PM

I wasted 3 weeks on the silly pulley.  Now it's time to get back down to business and I've forgotten where I left off.  There are parts strewn all around the garage and I think I stuffed a whole bunch of them into boxes to free up some bench space for lathe project,  I'm hoping that I can figure it all out on Saturday...after I get back from picking up a new motor for my Bridgeport ( :

 

IMG_3245.JPG


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#252 UncleWillie ONLINE  

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Posted February 18, 2016 - 10:31 PM

Nothing like project in the middle of a project to throw a monkey wrench into things.

#253 Clint OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2016 - 04:56 AM

OK...back to the business of rebuilding a Panzer.

 

My pulley shined up pretty good on the outside, but the inside was looking pretty rough so I decided to throw it in the sandblast cabinet.  There was still a bit of grease packed into the nooks and crannies so I hit it with brake cleaner and a toothbrush first.  The sandblaster does nice things for aluminum...

 

BEFORE

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3239.JPG

 

AFTER

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3244.JPG

 

Back on the lathe for a little clean up.  The pulley has some imperfections so I was thinking about turning off .005"-.010" to get a perfect surface, but in the end, I decided it was good enough.  I'd really hate to make a mistake and ruin it.  I'd probably have to buy an entire tractor just to get another pulley.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3242.JPG

 

A liberal coating of grease and I slid it back into the carrier.  I'll have to remember to pump it full of grease later.

 

attachicon.gifIMG_3247.JPG

R. - Don't get too crazy with the grease in that jack shaft! I did on one of mine and it oozed out both ends and now the belt is really sticky. There's not much of a neutral now. I will need to disassemble and degrease the pulley and buy a new belt before it's correct. Bad thing is, I had just put the belt on and it was great before I greased it. I thought the pneumatic grease gun was empty, NOPE! Note to self: After changing grease cartridges prime gun while NOT on zerk! There isn't ANY slipping! I used it while hauling dirt and pushing snow. I wish I would have had it on my T70 when I played tug of war with Dad's cub cadet! My belt was slipping BAD then. It's on my facebook page. Hondarider-I'll tag you in them.



#254 jabelman OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2016 - 05:41 AM

same about polishing the pulley, as soon as you hit reverse the rubber puck leaves a mark, happens on mine but it cleans off

#255 Hondarider OFFLINE  

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Posted February 19, 2016 - 06:17 AM

Point taken on the grease.  I'm hoping that my new and improved reverse disc is made of non-marring material that won't make a mess of my perfectly polished pulley (that's fun to say).  However, there is the outside chance that the disc isn't going to hook up at all when reverse is engaged.  The material feels a bit strange.

 

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