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Emerald Ash Borer in your area?


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#1 Trav1s ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 11:51 AM

Just see that it made it to my area this summer.  I think the days for the ash tree in the back yard are numbered.  Anyone have experience treating them?

 

http://www.thegazett...county-20151019


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#2 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 12:19 PM

Yes, my brother had one Ash tree about 30 inches across with borers in it.
He looked into having it treated, and they quoted him $400 to treat it and said it would have to be done every 4 yrs.
He had it taken down.
I do not have any ash on my property. In fact there are only 9 trees on the place if you do not count the black willows along the waterway. Incidentally Black Willow is treated as a noxious species and is the only tree not protected on state property.
Iowa Forestry Service says 70 percent of the trees in Iowa are Ash.
We lose them the state will be nearly bald.
This may be worse than the Dutch Elm Disease that went through the state in the late 50s and early 60s.
When we lost most of the elm for shade trees people planted ash to rep,ace them.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 19, 2015 - 12:40 PM.

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#3 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 12:45 PM

If you must have an Ash, there are Asian Ashes that are immune to the borers.

 

The Ash are dying right and left here. At least you've still got Cottonwoods and Box Elders. :D


Edited by LilysDad, October 19, 2015 - 12:47 PM.

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#4 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 02:19 PM

Our state has been hammered for years.  I think I have one living ash on my property, the rest of the neighborhood had all the dead ones taken down last year.  There are very strict laws prohibiting the movement of firewood here in MI, due to the ash borer.


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#5 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 02:33 PM

Our state has been hammered for years.  I think I have one living ash on my property, the rest of the neighborhood had all the dead ones taken down last year.  There are very strict laws prohibiting the movement of firewood here in MI, due to the ash borer.


That is true here as well. Iowa DNR will not let anyone take firewood into a state park.
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#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 02:37 PM

If you must have an Ash, there are Asian Ashes that are immune to the borers.

The Ash are dying right and left here. At least you've still got Cottonwoods and Box Elders. :D

Yeah we still have a lot of Mulberry(I always keep what I cut, for smoking meats) hedge and locust( good firewood but I hate the thorns.) been considering planting hazelnut as a windbreak and nut production.


When I made the post above I forgot to count the 20 fruit trees I have planted over the past 5 yrs.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 19, 2015 - 02:39 PM.


#7 dodge trucker OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 02:41 PM

Yeah here in my area they are horrible. Seems like more dead trees than live ones any more.
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#8 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 03:05 PM

I wish people would learn to stop monoculturing street trees. Here in my town, if it isn't an Ash it's a Maple; and the Suger Maples are on shakey ground as well. I don't have a name for what's bothering the maples, but they just seem to slowly die, limb by limb. And what do people do? Plant another maple! Mix it up people! Plant different things. That way diseases have a harder time spreading, the landscape won't take such a hit if a pathogen comes along, and it looks more natural. In my area, Burr Oaks are the dominant tree. They are immune to prairie fires and almost everything else, and no one plants them!


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#9 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 03:26 PM

100 years ago it was the American Chestnut, 50 years ago it was the Elm, 20 years ago it was the Red Pines, and now in CT it is the Ash also. Globalization sure is causeing unforeseen problems. We also have problems from the gypsy moth, the starlings, and the English House Sparrows. In case you didn't know the English House Sparrows kill Eastern Bluebirds when they can get at the young. Kinda depressing aint it? Rick


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#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 03:57 PM

I wish people would learn to stop monoculturing street trees. Here in my town, if it isn't an Ash it's a Maple; and the Suger Maples are on shakey ground as well. I don't have a name for what's bothering the maples, but they just seem to slowly die, limb by limb. And what do people do? Plant another maple! Mix it up people! Plant different things. That way diseases have a harder time spreading, the landscape won't take such a hit if a pathogen comes along, and it looks more natural. In my area, Burr Oaks are the dominant tree. They are immune to prairie fires and almost everything else, and no one plants them!

Yeah those oaks can be a problem. When I was a teen we had two huge oaks in the front yard. Had 2x10s running between them and a swing. They would drop so many acorns you could not walk under them.
Dad had a 110 John Deer and had a sweeper for it. my chore was to sweep them into a pile, scoop them into a trailer and haul them off to the ditch.

#11 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:15 PM

The Ash borer is close, not sure it's verified here yet, but I think it's here.  We have a huge double trunk Ash in the back yard, but I'm not going to spend the money to have it treated.  Some smaller ones also, River Birch & soft Maples.

 

I have several Ash trees at the farm, 30 miles from here, some of my Black Walnuts out there are dying, too small for decent logs yet.  There's also a problem with Oaks, not big yet, but exists!  Seems to be a problem out there for most of the better varieties, but not the "trash" trees!


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#12 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:22 PM

There's a bunch of oak trees lining some of my road..  When I take the dog for a walk in the late summer the acorns are dive bombing us!  Chet gets startled then chases the acorns rolling about..  They are pretty tall as far as oaks go..  

 

The state has been cutting the Ash trees down around here to stop the spread of those dang critters..  Then they shred the wood..  What a waste of great firewood..   :wallbanging:    We wook a 60 footer down @ my neighbor's..  The felt like an earthquake when it hit the ground!  Lots of heat out of that baby! :rocker2:


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#13 Trav1s ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:28 PM

I planted a white swap Oak and a red oak in the back yard.  The red oak will provide the shade lost when the ash comes down. 

 

Speaking of problems with other types of tree - Iron chloridosis is a problem with pin oakes in Nebraska but I had never heard of it until I moved there.


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#14 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:51 PM

Yeah those oaks can be a problem. When I was a teen we had two huge oaks in the front yard. Had 2x10s running between them and a swing. They would drop so many acorns you could not walk under them.
Dad had a 110 John Deer and had a sweeper for it. my chore was to sweep them into a pile, scoop them into a trailer and haul them off to the ditch.

Your Dad didn't have a problem. He had a kid to clean them up. :D


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#15 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 07:18 PM

Your Dad didn't have a problem. He had a kid to clean them up. :D

Actually he had 6 sons to do the work! Had us spaced out so he had hired help that would work for the privelege of putting their feet under his table. Shortly after the youngest graduated, he retired and went to New Mexico, where he supervised construction at an Indian Bible College then pastored a little church in Tatum, NM(middle of nowhere about 10 miles from the Texas border) for 10 yrs.

Since I got to use the GT, it was one of the more fun chores he dreamed up to keep me out of trouble.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 19, 2015 - 07:25 PM.

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