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Last pile of wood, pictures


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#1 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:04 AM

This is the last pile of wood to split. Most of it is put away , then do the site clean up. Noel

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#2 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:13 AM

Glad you have that taken care of!


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#3 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 05:48 AM

Nice operation you have there.


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#4 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 06:08 AM

Man, that reminds me that I need to get started once. I am hoping for a mild winter. I love your setup.
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#5 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 06:44 AM

I haven't started yet.  Have the trees marked and the area mowed out where we work.  I drag the trees to a central location in the timber.  Block them up and push them on a pile with the loader.  Bring the tandem flat bed trailer to the site along with the wood spliter.  Split and put it on the trailer at that site.  All the mess stays in the timber.  Always a lot of shavings from the splitting operation so we gather them in a large yard trailer and use them as kindling.  Not much we don't use except for the bark as that don't always burn very well and keeps the real wood from burning.

 

A load we worked up in 2011.  Used to park it by the house and cover it but the last few years I keep it inside and bring it to the house when the supply in the mud room needs stocked again.  Normal stocking will run 10 days to 2 weeks, depending on the temp.   That is a 7' X 14' trailer bed and about 3' high.  IMG_1246.JPG


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#6 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 07:10 AM

I haven't started yet.  Have the trees marked and the area mowed out where we work.  I drag the trees to a central location in the timber.  Block them up and push them on a pile with the loader.  Bring the tandem flat bed trailer to the site along with the wood spliter.  Split and put it on the trailer at that site.  All the mess stays in the timber.  Always a lot of shavings from the splitting operation so we gather them in a large yard trailer and use them as kindling.  Not much we don't use except for the bark as that don't always burn very well and keeps the real wood from burning.

 

A load we worked up in 2011.  Used to park it by the house and cover it but the last few years I keep it inside and bring it to the house when the supply in the mud room needs stocked again.  Normal stocking will run 10 days to 2 weeks, depending on the temp.   That is a 7' X 14' trailer bed and about 3' high.  attachicon.gifIMG_1246.JPG

Now that's a pretty load of wood right there.


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#7 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 08:46 AM

Good for you. I haven't gotten my two broke tractors fixed. I'm resorting to slab wood from a local saw mill.

 

I'm curious about the metal roof on the barn. Is it worth painting them once they start to rust or should you just let it go and replace it in a few years. Metal roofs have only recently started to gain popularity for house roofs in my area. Good Luck, Rick


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#8 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 10:12 AM

Good for you. I haven't gotten my two broke tractors fixed. I'm resorting to slab wood from a local saw mill.

 

I'm curious about the metal roof on the barn. Is it worth painting them once they start to rust or should you just let it go and replace it in a few years. Metal roofs have only recently started to gain popularity for house roofs in my area. Good Luck, Rick

Slab wood works good from a saw mill.  Just have to be sure it is dry.  Wet wood, or fresh cut live trees is not good for burning.  Way to much creosote build up in the flue.  A fire waiting to happen.

 

Yes you can paint you steel roof.  I had a steel roof on a pole building from back when Strong Barn was a popular brand.  That is the narrow constant wavy ridges and valleys in the steel.  It was getting real rusty and insurance says do something or we won't insure thew roof.  So I bought 5 gallons of exterior paint and mixed different colors to come up with a light green.  Used a roofing brush to put it on as it was a fairly flat roof.  That was over 8 years ago and the paint is still on and very little rust showing.  If you can find a salvage places that buys up all the extra/odd paint from the mfg.s and large paint companies you can get it at a good price and mix it all up for your color.   May not be exactly what you want but sure does the trick and saves $$$ big time over new steel.


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#9 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 10:22 AM

I've burned slabwood before. It doesn't last as long nor heat as well but its free if I take it. He charges $30 to deliver a dump truck load but I have to help him load it(with his loader). I have 30+ oak trees to take down but prefer to push them down with the dozer so that the stump pops up. Otherwise a stump can take half an hour to dig out. My soil has alot of 3'+ rocks. Good Luck, Rick


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#10 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 12:38 PM

I've burned slabwood before. It doesn't last as long nor heat as well but its free if I take it. He charges $30 to deliver a dump truck load but I have to help him load it(with his loader). I have 30+ oak trees to take down but prefer to push them down with the dozer so that the stump pops up. Otherwise a stump can take half an hour to dig out. My soil has alot of 3'+ rocks. Good Luck, Rick

I don't like working up trees that have been dozed down.  They get way to much dirt in them and that is hard on chains.  I drop the dead trees, cutting them as close to the ground as possible.  No stump to worry about and the termites will take care of it in 6-8 years.  Stumps don't bother anything in a pasture timber so do it that way.  A heck of a lot cheaper too.  Dozers in this area are at $150 an hour upwards.  What ever works, go for it.


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#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 12:52 PM

That is a nice operation! You amaze me though, I think I have the same trailer you have behind the John Deere.
And I would have never put that much weight on it.
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#12 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 12:55 PM

Slab wood works good from a saw mill.  Just have to be sure it is dry.  Wet wood, or fresh cut live trees is not good for burning.  Way to much creosote build up in the flue.  A fire waiting to happen.
 
Yes you can paint you steel roof.  I had a steel roof on a pole building from back when Strong Barn was a popular brand.  That is the narrow constant wavy ridges and valleys in the steel.  It was getting real rusty and insurance says do something or we won't insure thew roof.  So I bought 5 gallons of exterior paint and mixed different colors to come up with a light green.  Used a roofing brush to put it on as it was a fairly flat roof.  That was over 8 years ago and the paint is still on and very little rust showing.  If you can find a salvage places that buys up all the extra/odd paint from the mfg.s and large paint companies you can get it at a good price and mix it all up for your color.   May not be exactly what you want but sure does the trick and saves $$$ big time over new steel.


Yeah with all the Envoirnmental Wacko stuff going on , you can get paint for almost nothing at a recycle center.
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#13 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 03:40 PM

I don't like working up trees that have been dozed down.  They get way to much dirt in them and that is hard on chains.  I drop the dead trees, cutting them as close to the ground as possible.  No stump to worry about and the termites will take care of it in 6-8 years.  Stumps don't bother anything in a pasture timber so do it that way.  A heck of a lot cheaper too.  Dozers in this area are at $150 an hour upwards.  What ever works, go for it.

I own my dozer(since 1988) and I am carefull about the dirt. I stick the bucket teeth into the trunk at about 6' up and put it in low and start forward. I lift with the boom at the same time and the tree lifts and goes down where I push it. I leave the dozer parked on the stump and the trunk a foot or two off the ground. It is then easier to cut up the tree. The bucket holds 1/3 cord per load. Unfortunately right now the dozer is broke. Good Luck, Rick

 

Also when using the dozer, I don't get any widow makers.


Edited by boyscout862, October 19, 2015 - 03:42 PM.


#14 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 03:58 PM

It's a great trailer. But if you saw it up close, it all dented from throwing wood in it. Just this year it's starting to rust through in some small areas. Had it for about 13 years. Use it in the woods too. Corners are rounded so it slops around the trees when it hits one. Noel.




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