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Wisconsin TRA 10d head gasket


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#1 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 02:56 PM

  I think (actually HOPE) that I have blown the head gasket on my 1054. It has been tough to start the last few times I used it, but ran good once started. The last time I used it it was still tough to get going, but ran well for a bit, then started to run rough, almost like it was running out of gas. I got around to working on it last weekend, removed the carb and cleaned it up. I put it back together and tried to get it going today. It is trying to fire and there is smoke coming out of the exhaust. Then I noticed that the smoke is actually coming out of the shroud behind the exhaust. I stuck my hand in there and cranked it over and sure enough, I can feel the air being pushed out back there.

 

  Does this sound like a blown head gasket or do I have bigger issues? I have not had time to dig further into it yet, Are the head gaskets readily available and if so about how much are they?

 

Thanks, Jim



#2 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 03:22 PM

Sounds like a possible blown or loose/cracked head

 

Generally you'll hear a hissing noise if there is a leak or notice a bunch of oil in one particular area on the head where its seeping out.

 

Head gaskets are readily available and I have plenty instock $8.99

 

 

Pull the head and see how things look.


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#3 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 04:14 PM

Thanks, I am not seeing any oil leaking, but this is on the back of the block where it is hard to see.  I will try to get it apart this week and find out for sure what the issue is.



#4 Chubien OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 06:50 PM

The area you describe is typically where these gaskets tend to fail, at least in my experience. All my tractors were bought with a failed head gasket, it seems to be a common problem and the symptoms seem to differ, sometimes you get blowing oil/smoke coming out of the blown area, sometimes you just notice the dash and hood get exceedingly hot.

My 1050 had a hard time running and ran very badly when I could get it started, the other tractors with blown gaskets did not run too badly.

Changing the gasket is not a huge job, these engines are not overhead valves, it takes more time taking the shrouds and accessories off than actually taking the head off.

I just finished changing the head gasket on my new 850 today, it takes me half a day but I'm very meticulous cleaning every part carefully, this one actually had a rodent nest behind the shroud and the engine fins were all packed solid so this took more time to clean, I also sand the head down on my granite slab to ensure it is straight.

Next is my 1000, this one runs OK but it misfires a bit and after running for 15 minutes or more the hood gets so hot you can practically burn yourself on it - it is also leaking in the area you describe.

It's a good opportunity to take the head off and take the carbon off the piston, valves and head, you may be surprised how much buildup is there, my last 850 was so carbonised that I'm thinking that's why the gasket blew in the first place.

Good luck
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#5 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 08:20 PM

Thanks Chubien. I did get some time this afternoon to start tearing it down. I have the rear shroud off, the fuel tank mounting bracket off, the two bolts at the bottom of the front shroud still to go and the one head bolt closest to the exhaust port. The two on the front shroud I just didn't get to yet, the last head bolt is very stiff and seems to want to break. I soaked it down with PB and will try again tomorrow after work. Hopefully it will cooperate and I can get  things apart, parts ordered and get it up and running again soon.

 

Thanks, Jim



#6 Chubien OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 08:30 PM

One other thing, the torque specs on these heads is very low, I believe 18ft/lbs, I had head bolts come loose on my 800 after changing the head gasket so I torque them a little bit more now, I did 22ft/lbs on my last few.
I figured since we're reusing the old head bolts and the replacement gaskets are a different material to the original design spec there may be justification for torquing a bit more but I could be wrong. The 800 gasket is holding now.
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#7 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 09:12 PM

When I was pulling the head bolts out I was a bit surprised at how small they were.Briggs and Techumseh head bolts are much longer and larger in diameter.



#8 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 18, 2015 - 10:27 PM

When replacing a head gasket the cleaning is essencial. Flattening the head will gain longevity. I also like to chase the threads in the block with a tap and run a die on the bolts. Cleanning the threads will assure a proper torquing. You may need a light coating of oil. Dry bolts vs oiled bolts can be more than a 25% difference. Check your manual for what is required.

 

While you have it apart, look at the cylinder ridge to see how worn the cylinder is. Inspect the valves to see if they need to be cleanned and lapped. Good Luck, Rick


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#9 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 07:57 AM

One other thing, the torque specs on these heads is very low, I believe 18ft/lbs, I had head bolts come loose on my 800 after changing the head gasket so I torque them a little bit more now, I did 22ft/lbs on my last few.
I figured since we're reusing the old head bolts and the replacement gaskets are a different material to the original design spec there may be justification for torquing a bit more but I could be wrong. The 800 gasket is holding now.

 

The new ones wisconsin has now are  a graphoil (Spelling??) material I believe, they had to do away with the old iron clad design because they originally used asbestos in them.


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#10 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 04:34 PM

When replacing a head gasket the cleaning is essencial. Flattening the head will gain longevity. I also like to chase the threads in the block with a tap and run a die on the bolts. Cleanning the threads will assure a proper torquing. You may need a light coating of oil. Dry bolts vs oiled bolts can be more than a 25% difference. Check your manual for what is required.

 

While you have it apart, look at the cylinder ridge to see how worn the cylinder is. Inspect the valves to see if they need to be cleanned and lapped. Good Luck, Rick

 

 

Thanks for the advice. I will do that.

 

Jim


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#11 Tbrooks OFFLINE  

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Posted October 19, 2015 - 09:17 PM

When replacing a head gasket the cleaning is essencial. Flattening the head will gain longevity. I also like to chase the threads in the block with a tap and run a die on the bolts. Cleanning the threads will assure a proper torquing. You may need a light coating of oil. Dry bolts vs oiled bolts can be more than a 25% difference. Check your manual for what is required.
 
While you have it apart, look at the cylinder ridge to see how worn the cylinder is. Inspect the valves to see if they need to be cleanned and lapped. Good Luck, Rick

i worked as a service tech at one time for a major import machine company (sound like brizzly industrial) we found that torch factors on bolts were increased when lubricated with oil, but oil dries out over time. That oil takes up space. When it dries out, or burns off as it would on a head bolt, there is a void. Even though a small void. It still impacted the torque setting. What we thought was torqued properly over time was 40% less than what it should have been. My advice would be to run the tap and die, then clean the hole and head bolt with wax and grease remover. Let them dry. Then torque them. It is amazing what a couple of thousands of an inch can do to a torque setting.
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#12 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2015 - 05:39 PM

I got the head off this afternoon and I see no damage other than the blown gasket (big sigh of relief). When I got the rear shroud off I could see lots of black soot, but no oil. The big wet area you see in the pictures is actually PB Blaster from getting the last head bolt loose. There is a bit of a ridge on the cylinder, but nothing too major, I tried to show it in one picture. The exhaust valve and seat look good, I tried to show that as well. I haven't rolled it over yet to look at the intake, but if the exhaust looks good, I don't expect any issues with the intake ( but I will check it later anyway). Any tips for cleaning the carbon off without risking scratching anything?

 

The first picture shows the blackened area on the head where it was leaking. The second one is the block with the head gasket still in place. You can see just below the exhaust valve where there is a big piece blown out of the gasket. The third picture is trying to show the cylinder ridge, the fourth is an attempt to show the valve and seat and the last one shows the gasket removed to show the blow out better.

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#13 Bolens 1000 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2015 - 05:46 PM

Yep, that was the problem, the inside looks normal for what you would see on the inside.

 

 

I usually use a carbon/gasket scraper then have a bunch of little wire wheels that attach to a little dremel to get the tight to reach areas.


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#14 Chubien OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2015 - 06:03 PM

That gasket has been blown for a while by the looks of it.

You may end up with a much better running engine than when you bought it.
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#15 CanadianHobbyFarmer OFFLINE  

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Posted October 20, 2015 - 06:14 PM

Yep, that was the problem, the inside looks normal for what you would see on the inside.

 

 

I usually use a carbon/gasket scraper then have a bunch of little wire wheels that attach to a little dremel to get the tight to reach areas.

That is good to hear. I will send you a PM in a little while regarding ordering the gasket. We discussed parts for my tiller a while back and life, work and truck issues has put that on the back burner for a bit. It is now going to be a winter project. I let my pigs do the fall tilling anyway. I have to look in the tiller manual to find the numbers of what I need, then I will contact you.


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