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Wood splitter pump, question, what to buy ?


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#1 propane1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 07:23 PM

I don't know anything about splitter pumps. Can some one give me info on types, pressures, and flow rates. And what a basic one costs. Thanks for any help, Noel.

#2 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 07:24 PM

What is wrong with the one you have?



#3 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 08:03 PM

With wood spliters, try to reach the happy medium where you have decent speed and plenty of power.  When you have faster ram travel you usually loose in splitting power.  Changing pulley size on the pump and or engine can make a lot of different.  I would not go with less than a 10 hp  engine.  The old cast iron Briggs are my favorite as they have hang power that won't quit.  My is not real fast but there is not much it won't split if it is put in right.


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#4 Cvans OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 08:09 PM

Two stage pump. First stage allows the ram to move forward faster. When the ram contacts the wood and pressure builds the pump goes to the seconds stage which is less flow with a higher pressure output. I believe the return stroke is also on the first stage allowing a faster return. 

The splitter my Son uses is set up this way and has worked flawlessly for years. 


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#5 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 08:21 PM

   two stage pump as cvans said and go with a really hi gpm pump to increase the speed.  tsc has some really nice ones and so does surplus center.

                          Pete


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#6 Auburn David OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 08:45 PM

   two stage pump as cvans said and go with a really hi gpm pump to increase the speed.  tsc has some really nice ones and so does surplus center.

                          Pete

 

Two stage pump. First stage allows the ram to move forward faster. When the ram contacts the wood and pressure builds the pump goes to the seconds stage which is less flow with a higher pressure output. I believe the return stroke is also on the first stage allowing a faster return. 

The splitter my Son uses is set up this way and has worked flawlessly for years. 

Well since no one else said it ...you should use a 2 stage pump!!


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#7 glgrumpy ONLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 09:24 PM

I've been using Agrisupply.com for many items and better prices. Try there for a pump, 2 stage as noted.  Right now most farm stores have lots of wood handling stuff advertised if not on sale, check them out. Rural King, TSC, places on that order.


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#8 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 09:25 PM

I have a single stage pump on a Tecumseh engine. Central Tractor 28ton force, not a lot it won't make into firewood.
The two stage would be nice if you're in a hurry, but not mandatory... My Dad wasn't in a rush, little at a time and the job gets done.
It's been doing the job for a long time and it does it well.
We have replaced the engine once because the newer "hippy-dippy-Eco-friendly-piece-of-crap-over-engineered-engine" wore out faster than the rest of the unit and has always been a PITA to start. This older 10hp Teccy has all the power we will ever need.
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#9 Auburn David OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 09:42 PM

I have a single stage pump on a Tecumseh engine. Central Tractor 28ton force, not a lot it won't make into firewood.
The two stage would be nice if you're in a hurry, but not mandatory... My Dad wasn't in a rush, little at a time and the job gets done.
It's been doing the job for a long time and it does it well.
We have replaced the engine once because the newer "hippy-dippy-Eco-friendly-piece-of-crap-over-engineered-engine" wore out faster than the rest of the unit and has always been a PITA to start. This older 10hp Teccy has all the power we will ever need.

Please tell us how you really feel!!!


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#10 Auburn David OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 09:43 PM

Sorry guys..Doc put me on new meds and I am happy as can be!!!


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#11 DH1 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 09:52 PM

I use an old single stage pump splitter. Had it 8 or so yrs, always got the wedge stuck.

It came with a 7hp flat head Honda on it that was tired, I put a 8hp Briggs IC engine on it and it was a little better but still got stuck.

I then put a 13hp Honda clone on it, that motor didn't load up or slow down like the others but found that the wedge got stuck even more often.

I always thought it was slow and didn't have much splitting power, also the return stroke never worked right, you always had to hold the control down for the ram to move back, even though it had the kickoff feature.

So I changed the control valve with a new one that has the kick off valve on it and WOW what a difference. Now the wedge never gets stuck, it just goes through almost anything and you can stall the motor out by holding the control down at the end of it's stroke in less than 1sec.

The pressure relieve on the new control is way higher than the old one.

Now the splitter is faster even though the ram moves at the same speed for 2 reasons. 

1 -  it never gets stuck any more.

2 - the kick off feature works so you hands are free to handle the wood.

 

If it had a 2 stage pump on it, the right one for the size of motor it would be even faster.

 

Another way to speed up the operation is have 2 people work the splitter.

1  just works the control and the other handles the wood.


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#12 Bruce Dorsi OFFLINE  

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Posted October 07, 2015 - 09:54 PM

I don't know anything about splitter pumps. Can some one give me info on types, pressures, and flow rates. And what a basic one costs. Thanks for any help, Noel.

 

A 2-stage pump flowing 11gpm at low pressure sells as low as $117 US.

 

A 2-stage pump flowing 28gpm at low pressure sells in the $420 US range.

 

There are 11, 13, 16, 22, & 28 gpm two-stage pumps available at various prices from different sources.

 

www.northerntool.com is a good place to start comparing what is available.

 

What will be using for power?  ...What size bore & stroke on your cylinder?

 

Too small of pump flow will make your splitter cycle too slow, but a smaller engine can be used.

 

Higher flow rates require more horsepower, but the cycle times will decrease. 

 

Typical 2-stage pumps will operate at 900 psi with rated flow rate, but shift to a much lower flow rate at 3000 psi. 

 

If you know engine horsepower, cylinder sizes, or pump flow,  cycle times, splitting force, and other things can be calculated. 

 

You are trying to achieve a balance between speed, pressure, and hp required.


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#13 camdigger OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2015 - 01:44 AM

Something that hasn't been mentioned yet is cylinder size. Cylinder size will give a certain tonnage push for a given pressure. The trade off is bigger cylinder size means more push, but slower cycle time.

Power consumption is the product of pressure and flow rate ( pump output).

The beauty of a 2 stage pump is that if the high pressure - low volume stage is 1/3 the output of the low pressure - high volume stage, you can split the same wood with 1/3 the input HP with a minor increase in cycle time. Properly running, the pump will put out max volume until the pressure build above the setting, then the high pressure, low volume side keeps on pushing until stalled or finished. The high flow then returns the cylinder.

There are several hydraulic calculators available on line from surplus hydraulics and Princess auto among others. These sheets will give some info on cycle times, etc.

Overall, the pump decisions will be affected by power available, power required, funds, and designer choice.

I built a splitter using a 6.5 HP Chicom engine, and other parts from PA designed around a 3.5" x 24" cylinder I had laying around. Works good for the spruce, pine, poplar, and black poplar we have. No use designing for oak or mesquite, there aren't any of either of those species within 1200 miles.....

Edited by camdigger, October 08, 2015 - 01:45 AM.

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#14 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2015 - 03:37 AM

A lot of wood splitting efficiency depends on how well the operator can read the grain of the wood he is splitting.  A piece that gets stuck one way will slide through with 1/4 turn or end for end.  Always put the end with the knot, fork burl, twist, etc. against the push plate and the other end against the wedge.  On large pieces, like 24" diameter start from the outside and split off 2 or 3" at a time and work around the block.  That can depend on how large a piece you want in the end.  I use mine in a fireplace and it burns better and easier to handle when in smaller pieces.  95% of what I use is Oak, Walnut or Red Elm.  I try to stay away from the soft wood as it takes twice as much to get the same amount of heat.  But if that is all you have available, that is what you use.  If you don't have hard wood around why spend the $$ for a 2 stage pump?  Mine is an old single stage with an old cast iron 10 hp Briggs engine.  4" pulley on engine and pump and use a B belt.  Only thing with mine is I don't have the kick off type valve.  Lever has to held in both directions and the operator has to stop it before it hits the end of the stroke or you will burn the belt.  May change that this fall before I start splitting.


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#15 KC9KAS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 08, 2015 - 04:10 AM

35 years ago, 2 buddies and myself built a log splitter. This unit was in use all the time!

5 hp B&S, 2 stage pump, 24' X 4" cylinder. 1" wide wedge 10" tall with "wings" about 4" back from the wedge point. This thing was almost unstoppable!

It is still being used by one of the fellows brother-in-law....( longer story here) and all he has done to it was replace the B&S engine!


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