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Repainting question


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#1 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 05:42 AM

On my Ford 3400  tractor the backhoe is from the fifties , had been painted many times through it's life and year ago I was going to repaint it at that time only scraped the rust and spot primed with red oxide Rustoleum  .But without that ever being top coated was really just a waste . Since it's now running again while I was repairing some hose last Saturday my wife scraped the loose rust and paint . I figured I better get some paint on it , primed it Sun. and Mon. I had enough to give it one spray coat of paint , it used a lot more paint then I thought it would , only had 1 1/2 qts . I wanted 2 coats .    I got  2 more  qts. but it has been raining since and I don't think we'll have any dry weather until late next week . If this was just body panels I could scuff it with sandpaper or scotch brite pads but there are fittings control handles ,tight spots ,  really the paint isn't even smooth because the paint was chipped .  I was thinking I could get most of it with liquid sandpaper but maybe someone has a better option . Maybe slow drying thinner so it would bite in ?   I was using fast drying since it's being painted outside .  Remember this paint job is just to keep it looking decent and not all rusty like it was , it's going to be working as soon as I get all the electrical parts installed . I'll start another thread on that , thanks Al

 

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#2 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:23 AM

If what is on the metal now is not tight and holding good, anything you put on top will not stay.  With that many coats of paint it will be hard to get a smooth paint job without sand blasting the whole tractor.  If your just after some pain on it to stop the rusting, I would get a Hotsey or other hot water high pressure washer and give it a good bath.  After it has dried spray it down good with cheep oven cleaner.  Watch your eyes and don't breath the fumes directly.   Let that soak in for 15 or 20 min. and then go after it with the washer again.  The oven cleaner will get right after the dirt and grease and under any loose paint.  The pressure washer should take the loose stuff all off.  If it don't come off in all likely hood it will hold your new paint.

 

A friend in NW MO. restores old tractors and this is his method without the hot water pressure washer.  I did an old IH 400 that way about 15 years ago and the paint is still staying one. Dull as I didn't get the final coats thinned down enough to get a good shine but that was my fault.  Had nothing to do with the cleaning.



#3 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:45 AM

chieffan I'm not sure if I explained my question well enough , it's top coated already but I wasn't sure how to prepare a second coat since it's going to be almost 2 weeks between the first top coat and second .



#4 gopher OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:45 AM

If you easy off oven cleaner try on spot not noticeable cause it will remove a lot of different paints especially fresh paint and about all rattle can paints. 



#5 dblover OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:51 AM

You need to scuff the paint to allow the second coat to get good adhesion as the recoat window passed.  I like using Scotch Brite pads (red) to do the job - others like using 200-220 grit emery paper. The Scotch pads are especially good at doing curved surfaces.  Then get the dust off before painting the next coat.


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#6 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:58 AM

I might try the oven cleaner when on do the sheet metal  of the tractor itself . On that I can remove the hood so at least that will look good . The hoe is going to be painted a gray and the tractor yellow


Edited by Alc, October 02, 2015 - 07:59 AM.


#7 dblover OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 08:12 AM

Also - some old school non-paint booth painters prefer painting when it is raining.  The rain keeps the dust and bugs down.  You just need to adjust to allow thinner coats due to the higher humidity slowing the drying time and increasing the risk of paint runs.

 

 

 

Clarification: the painting is down inside/under something so no water gets on the piece/vehicle while your are painting and it is raining outside.  If you let the rain/water get on the paint before it sets up, the paint will get spots the size of the rain drops where the paint solvents could not evaporate out of the paint evenly due to the water.  


Edited by dblover, October 02, 2015 - 02:01 PM.

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#8 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 10:35 AM

 

Also - some old school non-paint booth painters prefer painting when it is raining.  The rain keeps the dust and bugs down.  You just need to adjust to allow thinner coats due to the higher humidity slowing the drying time and increasing the risk of paint runs.

That's something Ive never heard of !  I do remember my grandfather putting water on an just drying enamel painted car , something to seal it or dry it ? That's going back 40 years now lol



#9 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 01:08 PM

Also - some old school non-paint booth painters prefer painting when it is raining. The rain keeps the dust and bugs down. You just need to adjust to allow thinner coats due to the higher humidity slowing the drying time and increasing the risk of paint runs.


That is what I remember my dad doing when he painted.

#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 02:19 PM

That's something Ive never heard of ! I do remember my grandfather putting water on an just drying enamel painted car , something to seal it or dry it ? That's going back 40 years now lol

When I worked at the International dealership in High school, Old Don Klein repainted all the trade ins.
He would steam clean, take off all removable sheet metal and mask. Then he would. Roll the tractor out of the bay and hose the bay down. He said it was to contain any dust.

My experience while working paint at farmhand was that a second coat had to be applied within 24 hrs or wait 2 weeks.
If that would not be done, the thinners would work into the first coat and curdle the paint. That was all Ag enamel and if I remember correctly the thinner was xylol.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 02, 2015 - 02:20 PM.

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#11 backyardtinker OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:01 PM

I agree that a basic scuff with scotch brite is sufficient in my experience ( which, admittedly is not that of an auto body pro) but enough to comment on the topic. The fact that some small areas will remain untouched by the abrasive will not really matter and you will be able to achieve enough mechanical adhesion to retain the paint. Especially considering that it will be a hard working piece. In the future,should some small portion flake off, you can scuff that down and retouch where it needs it.


Edited by backyardtinker, October 02, 2015 - 07:01 PM.

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#12 Eric OFFLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 07:24 PM

The method of painting and the timing between coats depends heavily on the paint being used and the thinner you have added, also if any hardening agents were mixed in. Most thinners will leech out of the paint within 48 hours, but not all. That is where the two week comment comes in, two weeks is most likely long enough for most thinner to evaporate out of the paint and a second coat will adhere without being affected. Scuffing the first coat lightly with mild sandpaper will give the second coat good adhesion. Think of paint as microscopic Velcro, if you don't create the loop the hook will have no where to grab!
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