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Found Something Unexpected


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#1 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 05:14 PM

I have a bunch of dull chains for my Stihl. The local place has gone up to $7 to sharpen each and you have to leave them for a few days. I didn't. Started thinking about the old Belsaw Sharpening shop that I bought 30 years ago. It had the main machine, a hand saw filer, a reel mower sharpener, band sander, and a chain sharpener. I tried to use the chain sharpener when I got it but it had problems.

 

Today I was cleaning up a work area and putting things away when I came across the Belsaw Chain Sharpener. I got it out, lubed it up and tried it. It spins but I still haven't got the guide to work right. I went to the Belsaw site but my machine is over 50 years old and is not shown on the site. It has a feature that I like. It only spins at 1550 rpm so, it is less likely to burn the teeth like most machines(and operators) do.

 

While I was on the Belsaw site I found that they have small engine parts at better prices than I usually can get them. https://shop-foley-b...om/foley/83.cat

 

I'm going to try YOUTube for help with the sharpener. Good Luck, Rick


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#2 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 05:31 PM

Let us know how it works out.  I have an HF chain sharpener and it does a decent job.


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#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 08:19 PM

Interesting! I have often wondered how much things might have been different if I had bought the equipment and taken the foley-be saw sharpening correspondence course back in the 70s,when I was looking into it? Also considered their locksmithing course.

Edited by JD DANNELS, October 01, 2015 - 08:21 PM.

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#4 wvbuzzmaster OFFLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 08:31 PM

I have one is those saw sharpening and then kerf setting machines I believe are Belsaw, but they are for hand saws lol. I can't remember but I think I bought them for $10 or he was throwing them away lol.
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#5 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 08:46 PM

I have all Foley Bellsaw equipment in my sharpening shop.  Good quality equipment but their set up for saw chains were never all that accurate.  I use the Harbor Freight sharpener.  It works good as long as you don't force it.  Have run a lot of hand saws through the filer, most my own for my Disston collection.  The saw set and re-toother both do a real good job once you learn how to run them.  The tool I really like is the carbide grinder.  Very accurate machine for a manual operation.  Hard to do the cheap blades as the teeth are not precise enough for the machine.  As for those saw chains, you can pay for a HF sharpener in short order at $7 a pop.  I get $5 for mine but not trying to make a living at it either.


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#6 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted October 01, 2015 - 10:53 PM

The chain grinder is very similar to the commercial grinders that the saw shops use. Its all nice steel construction(its over 50 years old), and I figure when I can get it working that it will do a better job because it won't overheat the teeth.

 

My first new handsaw was in 1964, it is a Disston D-23, 8 point. I still have it. I have a small tool box with the hand sharpening tools. Young guys don't seem to comprehend that the hand saw can be faster and less irritating(to the ears) than a circular saw. My father was a Union Master Carpenter and he stressed to me "neither mechanics nor fools can work with dull tools". He also taught me that sharp tools are safer than dull tools because you don't have to force them. My father and both grandfathers were carpenters that died with all their parts intact.

 

I bought the tool set from a local minister who was retired and was facing surgery. I overpaid for the stuff, but it paid back that winter when I sharpened over 300 dull drill bits. I do want to make enough room to set it all up because I have alot of old tools that need rehab. I also want to learn how to use the reel mower sharpener. It is the biggest of the machines and I have several reels to sharpen.

 

JD Daniels: I haven't taken any of their courses. Reverand Cooper told me that he bought the set in the early 60s and did the instructions in order to supplement his familys' income. He found that his parisheners thought that he should be doing it for them for free. He got fedup and just left it in his basement until I bought it. You probably saved alot of money and aggrevation by not getting involved. If you can come across a great deal on some of the equipment now, go for it. Good Luck, Rick


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#7 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 08:00 AM

I bought most of my equipment as a package deal.  a finish contract carpenter bought it all in hopes of sharpening his carbide power cut off blades.  When he found the machines were not built for that I got is all, Saw filer, had saw set, re-toother, 1055 grinder with several attachments, plus a bunch of carbide 10" saw blades, + more.  Paid $125 for the works.  Later I bought my carbide grinder with 3 or 4 diamond wheels, carbide side grinder, carbide tooth replacing set up and all for $500.  Sold the side grinder for $25 so have $250 in my carbide grinder.  I think I have it all paid for from doing sharpening for others.  I work through the local lumber yard.  They are the drop off and pick up place.  Gets traffic in the door and usually some additional sales.  Scissors are the most fun as they are quick and easy to do for a $5 bill.  Need the tool to remove the center screw though.  Got that with the package deal.  I have reconditioned about 45 Disston hand saws which are in my collection.  Always looking for hand saws which can usually be bought for a couple bucks for a hand full at auctions.  I try to keep my prices low to help others out and a little extra pocket change now and then.  But at $125 a pop for a diamond grinding wheel I cannot do it for nothing.


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#8 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted October 02, 2015 - 04:34 PM

Sharp tools are the answer. No matter what type. Saves forcing and more chance to get hurt from forcing. My father always said when using a hand saw to cut wood, let the saw do the work, and I always think of that while doing any sawing or drilling.   The only thing I can think of thats better dull than sharp, is a splitting axe.  Sorry if I got off topic, Noel


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