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Ever use a screw cone type of wood splitter?


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#16 kellerman88 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 12:44 PM

Those things seem neat but really impractical. 

 

 

Sorry to go off in left field, but this reminds me of cleaning up a fallen tree at camp earlier this year.

 

Me, "Dad, how come we don't just get a log splitter for out here?"

Dad, "Your mother gave birth to a log splitter 27 years ago, get back to work."


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#17 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 02:48 PM

I use one...it works great, and I find it very efficient.  Depending on the ram style of choice, it can be faster, too.  Never had a problem with knotty wood, and they are typically setup with a bar to prevent wood from spinning.  Most of the vid clips I've seen scare me because you see folks using them poorly...wood should be put to the cone on it's side, and depending on thickness, 1/4 or 1/3 of the way up the side of the log. Worst thing to do is stand it on end and hit a big log square in the center.  They are nice because they use the tractor for power and transport, have adjustable height from the ground in case you do not want to lift large logs, and have no additional engine maintenance and take little space for storage.

 

The gap in safety is the lack of a dead man's switch.  Rig up a kill or PTO interlock switch to a lanyard or a pressure switch beneath a board to stand on, and you have that covered.

 

The danger I see with these, vs other types, is that it is a heavy, sharp object when not in use.  I screw on a small piece of wood when I'm done (by hand...letting the PTO pull one on and killing power can make for an awful tough startup), so noone can run into it, and so if it happened to fall it cannot pierce.

 

20150907_142346.jpg

20150907_142354.jpg


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#18 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 02:50 PM

Those things seem neat but really impractical. 

 

 

Sorry to go off in left field, but this reminds me of cleaning up a fallen tree at camp earlier this year.

 

Me, "Dad, how come we don't just get a log splitter for out here?"

Dad, "Your mother gave birth to a log splitter 27 years ago, get back to work."

 

 

Haha...I like that!  My logsplitters are still too young to raise an axe and maul though...


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#19 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 05:16 PM

I prefer splitting with a  maul,,its sort of satisfying,,right up there with seat time.  I do like this wheel version of a splitter but Im sure it has taken its share of limbs and appendages

 

 

 
 
 
 
 

Edited by Jazz, September 23, 2015 - 05:17 PM.

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#20 shorty OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 05:18 PM

I use one...it works great, and I find it very efficient. Depending on the ram style of choice, it can be faster, too. Never had a problem with knotty wood, and they are typically setup with a bar to prevent wood from spinning. Most of the vid clips I've seen scare me because you see folks using them poorly...wood should be put to the cone on it's side, and depending on thickness, 1/4 or 1/3 of the way up the side of the log. Worst thing to do is stand it on end and hit a big log square in the center. They are nice because they use the tractor for power and transport, have adjustable height from the ground in case you do not want to lift large logs, and have no additional engine maintenance and take little space for storage.

The gap in safety is the lack of a dead man's switch. Rig up a kill or PTO interlock switch to a lanyard or a pressure switch beneath a board to stand on, and you have that covered.

The danger I see with these, vs other types, is that it is a heavy, sharp object when not in use. I screw on a small piece of wood when I'm done (by hand...letting the PTO pull one on and killing power can make for an awful tough startup), so noone can run into it, and so if it happened to fall it cannot pierce.

20150907_142346.jpg
20150907_142354.jpg


Neat setup MrGreen. Is that homemade?

#21 toomanytoys84 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 05:30 PM

That sticker say bark buster?

#22 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted September 23, 2015 - 08:07 PM

That sticker say bark buster?


Yup...like Stickler, they made these into the 80s I think. Ive seen a few around, but they fetch nearly as much as a towable ram type. Finally snatched one at the local consignment auction and love it. I even make kindling to dry, from the 2-4" limbs I trimmed this year. It would probably split something as small as a 1" limb. Biggest I have personally tried is about 18". It doesnt know the difference between the two extremes.
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