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Respirator for Painting & Other Uses


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#1 FixItCharlie ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2015 - 03:34 PM

In the past I have used a regular cartridge respirator & Vaseline when painting or in other dust conditions. The reason for the Vaseline is because I have a full beard & shaving the beard is no answer to this question. This seems to work fairly good but the mess to clean up can be a problem. Almost all of us here do some painting & doing it outside is not always an option even then some time protection ma be needed. I have been thinking about some type of full face respirator. The cost of this needs to be reasonable & wondering what others have found to be the best options.

 

Charlie



#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2015 - 04:04 PM

Isn't there a medical beard cover? Maybe you can use it with the respirator. Good Luck, Rick

#3 Bill 76 ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2015 - 04:25 PM

Try an army surplus gas mask , they cover your whole face . I would recommend you  adapt a good respirator cartridge for whatever the chemical or solvent you would be using.Fleet Farm has them sometimes for about $15 brand new .  


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#4 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted September 13, 2015 - 04:44 PM

A 3M full face respirator, like the 6000 series, runs about $60-$80 dollars. A two pack of P100 filters is about another $30-$40. Like pictured below, but would have filters attached where the plastic plug is to the side of my mouth.

image.jpg image.jpg

#5 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2015 - 04:33 AM

A 3M full face respirator, like the 6000 series, runs about $60-$80 dollars. A two pack of P100 filters is about another $30-$40. Like pictured below, but would have filters attached where the plastic plug is to the side of my mouth.

attachicon.gifimage.jpgattachicon.gifimage.jpg

 

That mask will not give you a proper seal wearing a beard.  The whole point of the mask is to eliminate all toxins.

I would not choose vanity over personal health...JMHO 

There are plenty of folks suffering permanent effects of paint fumes,,,symptoms include feeling like they have a permanent hangover that lasts until they get the other foot in the grave. 


Edited by Jazz, September 14, 2015 - 05:54 PM.


#6 FixItCharlie ONLINE  

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Posted September 14, 2015 - 08:50 PM

Isn't there a medical beard cover? Maybe you can use it with the respirator. Good Luck, Rick

That type of cover is just a cover it does not help to seal a respirator.

 

This is some interesting reading on gas masks.

http://willowhavenou...ing-a-gas-mask/

 

The Full Face Respirators I question how well they seal with a beard but something I found at McMaster-Carr a Dust Hood & wonder if it might add to seal enough to make this a plausible alternative to something that has an external air supply.

http://www.mcmaster....irators/=yxwtjq

 

Thank you everyone for your responses. I feel certain that I am not the only one on this that has a full beard so I am hoping someone with a beard will respond on the solutions they have found. I am sure others will find this information helpful & find it unusual that it has not been discussed any place that I can find in the forum.

 

Charlie  


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#7 Jazz OFFLINE  

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Posted September 15, 2015 - 11:05 AM

This painter had a beard, and full set of overalls on when he started.. The toxins has effected him physically and mentally IMO

 

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#8 FixItCharlie ONLINE  

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Posted September 20, 2015 - 09:07 AM

My  thoughts are that you had your head in a paint bucket to long if that painter with a beard turned into that. LOL The reason that I have a beard is that I got tired of shaving 2 to 3 times a day to stay cleaned shaven. I am looking for a better solution to a problem I have with spraying paint with out spending $200 to $1000 for something that may only be used once or twice a year if that often. Most of the painting that I have done in the last couple of years is with a brush so that I did not have to deal with a respirator. There are pressurized mask that can be used but by the time you get the filters & everything to make this breathable air it gets very expensive. If I was a professional painter that did it every day that expense could be justifiable but not for the amount of painting that I do. Some would say do your painting outside but if you have ever had to pay to have someone`s car buffed out because of over spray getting on it you soon learn that is not a good solution. If anyone has any experience with a dust hood like the one from McMaster-Carr & a full face respirator I would like some opinions on how this would work.

 

Charlie



#9 Tennblue59 OFFLINE  

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Posted October 04, 2015 - 10:15 AM

Your best bet is going to be using a positive pressure air system. Basically it pumps air INTO the mask, so any leaks get air pushed OUT of them instead of pulling contaminated air INTO the mask when you inhale. Basically the system that fire fighters use. You just have to turn the pressure up with the beard to match the higher escape flow. This necessitates a clean air supply though. DO NOT try and breath the air out of your compressor - too much oil in it for your health! If you are scuba certified, you could adapt a scuba tank and have an easy source to get the tank refilled. At surface level, an 80 tank would last long enough to do a car... They make "clean" compressors for breathing use, but $$$...

Also realize that if you are using a hardener or auto quality paints, there are some NASTY chemicals in there that you need more than just a dust/particulate filter to remove. A rag or $2.00 dust mask will NOT protect your lungs! There are some filter systems that are ADEQUATE for a part time painter, but the cartridges are not cheap and have a limited life before they have to be replaced. It's not a buy and forget type of thing.

Also, some of the chemicals can be absorbed through skin contact, so you need full body liquid barrier. You can buy disposable paper jumpsuits for painting pretty cheap....
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#10 FixItCharlie ONLINE  

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Posted October 05, 2015 - 09:18 PM

Doing some research I am starting to find this may be the best way to go. You mention oil in compressed air from an air compressor & remember doing filters for this when setting up to fill Scuba tanks. One thing I am starting to wonder about is the new air compressor are shown in the name to be oil less. With these I wonder if the filtering to clean the oil would be as critical as using the oiled compressors was in the past. The cost for off the shelf equipment to do this type of protection may push it to the point of paying someone else to do the painting. Getting this information into one place may not only help me to decide what to do, but will also help others if they look at doing this. Thank you everyone for helping on this process that may help in the safety of everyone.

 

Charlie



#11 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2015 - 07:00 AM

Have you looked into what they call a fresh air hood for painting? Ifirst used this system years ago while in high school boces program while sand blasting, then later on in college they had this system in the paint booth an the prep deck. Lucky for me my beard isnt long enough to worry about one of these yet but the next shop will have one, since i love to paint for now ill keep my respirator an dust mask for dirty jobs.

 

Ive added the following links for fresh air systems.

 

 

http://www.zoro.com/...Fg&gclsrc=aw.ds

 

 

 

http://www.painttalk...der-700-a-4861/

 

 

http://www.turbinepr...m-w-tyvek-hood/


Edited by backwoods, October 06, 2015 - 07:01 AM.

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#12 FixItCharlie ONLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2015 - 04:32 PM

Thank you Greg. That Breathcool II Supplied Air Respirator looks like a very good setup. The price is a lot better then the other devices of this type that I have looked at. I do not plan to spray any paint in the near future so that give time to get the money saved for this. Any idea which would be better the tyvek hood or the vinyl hood.

 

Charlie  



#13 backwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted October 06, 2015 - 06:00 PM

Personal preference I think. Either way they'll both be a lil warm.
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