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Winter comming,wood stove heat exchanger


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#1 Auburn David OFFLINE  

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Posted September 08, 2015 - 10:11 PM

looks interesting!!! http://thehomesteads...t/#.UfK-VFfHa3g


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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted September 08, 2015 - 11:31 PM

I had one of the comercial made ones 35 years ago. I did not like it. It interfered with the chimney's draw and got clogged with creosote if the fire didn't burn real hot. I've learned that I want my chimney hot so that it draws well. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 04:43 AM

You need the heat for the flue. If it's to cold it will condensate and cause poor draft and creosote build up. Then the next hot fire you have your flue may go a fire from the creosote. Noel
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#4 petrj6 ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 04:59 AM

:ditto: :iagree:


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#5 David Brown OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 05:59 AM

I've been using a commercial unit for many years.  While they do present their challenges, I have far more issues with the pipe itself.  This comes strictly from the way I have to set mine up.  My woodstove is in the basement so I had to go out through the wall with a horizontal section of pipe.  That kills me because it eventually plugs up just about solid no matter how dry the wood is.  The exchanger at least has a plate slider that I can use to keep it clean.  Because of my set up, I have to give the chimney at least one mid winter cleaning.  I usually just tackle the heat exchanger then.  I like the heat exchanger because I can use it to get the heat upstairs faster.  I piped it into my duct work so there is basically 24 hours of heat trickling through to the house.  Whenever the furnace does kick on, the ductwork already has warm air in it so the furnace runs less.  This home built heat exchanger looks like one I wouldn't want to use because of the pipe pattern.  It looks like it would be a little more difficult to clean.


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#6 Auburn David OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 07:49 AM

I cant use a wood stove(per my Dr)because of COPD..but I sure miss that smell.


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#7 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 07:52 AM

Better check with your insurance company first.  Many of them will not allow any kind of heat exchanger.  They have been the cause of many structure fires, basically starting with the chimney due to problems mentioned  prior posts. Much cheaper and safer way is to use a small fan in back of the stove and move the air across the top of the heating unit itself.  It don't take any high speed either.  An 8" fan on low will make a big difference.


Edited by chieffan, September 09, 2015 - 07:54 AM.

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#8 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 10:21 AM

I have wondered about making a flue pipe that has fins on it, like a hot water radiator for house heat, or like our small engines have to cool themselves. The fins would get hot from the pipe , then use a small fan as mentioned, to move the air. This will still cool your flue gases though. I have never tried this idea, Noel.
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#9 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 11:47 AM

We had one of those on our stove back in early 80's. ours had a small fan on it. It seemed to help I guess although that room was blistering hot from the stove anyway.

Dad set the flue on fire on Christmas morning one year, he put a bunch of card board boxes in there. He opened door after a few mins to check, it was like back draft, big rush of air and hot fire went up the chimney and caught a small fire. he got a bucket and ladder, but it had burnt out by the time he got here, no damage....flue was clean though :smilewink:

 

 

I have wondered about making a flue pipe that has fins on it, like a hot water radiator for house heat, or like our small engines have to cool themselves. The fins would get hot from the pipe , then use a small fan as mentioned, to move the air. This will still cool your flue gases though. I have never tried this idea, Noel.

 

My furnace add on has a bunch of rings that are fins on the exhaust pipe before it enters chimney that is supposed to help with that. Not sure if they make a difference since I have no fan on them.


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#10 TomLGT195 OFFLINE  

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Posted September 09, 2015 - 02:12 PM

I have a newer wood stove, one of those higher efficiency ones, it requires a smaller pipe only 6" and it needs to move up it fast to get a good draft going. That would effect the draft so i wouldn't use it. I have a small fan on the floor blowing air from behind on low. works pretty good.


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#11 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2015 - 08:37 AM

Our house has a built in wood fireplace, factory installed.  Flue goes up about 4' above the roof and the top is above the peek.  1:12 roof pitch.  Fireplace worked great till 2013 fall.  That spring we put a basement under the house and is discovered there were two flex pipes dropping down under the floor into the open crawl space.  After the basement was install they were extended to the outside.  That winter we noticed on a few occasions we were getting some smoke in the house.  Fireplace has it's own blower system.  Usually kept a good fire going so it didn't bother.  Last winter it was worse, more smoke in the house. Removed the outside hook up to the two flex pips and let them open into the basement.  I have checked this a few times and there is no draft going up the flex pipes.  Been trying to figure out why this was happening.  I have come to the conclusion that two maple trees have grown sufficiently they are interfering with the draft of the flue, even though they are 30' + from the flue but considerable taller.  I am going to put an extension on the flue to raise it up at least 3' but possibly 6' if I can find the matching flue.  This is 9" triple insulated flue pipe.  If that don't work, I guess I am through burning wood and will go heavier with the multi fuel stove in the basement.  I am considering installing a smaller unit in place of the wood fireplace.   I love the wood heat and don't mind the wood cutting and splitting but I do not like the smoke in the house.  Not about to cut down the 2 nice maple trees either.


Edited by chieffan, September 10, 2015 - 08:40 AM.


#12 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted September 10, 2015 - 01:10 PM

I have a high effiancy stove in the family room. It has two outlets to the pipe. One up top with a door and one lower. Once the fire is going decent, I close the top outlet. I can see the stack thermometer drop there is that much less heat escaping up the chimney. It sure made a difference once I figured out how to use it right.



#13 toomanytoys84 ONLINE  

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Posted September 11, 2015 - 09:11 PM

I seen one of these at a guys camp that was simply a metal box around the pipe with a little fan in it. It went around the flue pipe. Didn't have tubes or anything that went through the pipe.

The air coming out of that was very hot. Above that he had a magnetic flue temperature gauge and it was right in the correct range.

It was a neat set up.

Edited by toomanytoys84, September 11, 2015 - 09:21 PM.

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