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Rick Lighthart Needs help (Simplicity rear tiller on 2012 Landlord


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#1 Rick Lighthart OFFLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2011 - 09:52 PM

Today, Itried out the rear tiller on the 2012 that I have been toying with for the past year. I tried tilling a small area in my back yard. It was doing fine till I tried going down deeper . To my surprize , the tiller pushed the tractor and I couldn't stop it. I ran right thru the door of my shed and into my other lawn equipment. what can I do to make sure this doesn,t happen again?
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#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted April 10, 2011 - 10:07 PM

Wow, thanks for the post, I have one too (allis version) and was planning on using it in a few days. Will have to watch that.

Wish I could help you with an answer.

#3 middleageddeere OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 05:02 AM

Put her in reverse! lol I am guessing that it will depend on what type of soil you are tilling. Yours is a gear drive? You might actually try putting it in reverse and or putting it in neutral and hitting the brakes.

Edited by middleageddeere, April 11, 2011 - 05:03 AM.
idiot


#4 middleageddeere OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 05:04 AM

BTW welcome to GT talk, this place is filled with knowledge, friendly people and terrible jokes! lol

#5 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 05:44 AM

First welcome to GTtalk.

You might want to do your first pass over the whole garden at the shallower depth and then go back around to make a deeper pass. Also pick the implement up and shut off the pto when you get close to the end of the run. Making sure your brakes are working, the tillers will push the tractor, which is why a hydro does make tilling easier but it can be done with a gear drive.

#6 nra1ifer OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 06:46 AM

OUCH!!!!!! I would agree with George: Start shallow, then increase the depth with each pass. I have had a similar problem using a walk-behind rear-tine tiller. In a newly-tilled spot, if I tried to go too deep, I'd go for quite a ride! Think about it: if the tines are trying to rotate in a forward direction and they can't pulverize what is being tilled, there's two options..... something breaks, or the tiller/tractor will get launched the same direction the tines are rotating. On "counter-rotating" tillers, the tines can be reversed (tines are moving opposite of the direction of travel), which is ideal for breaking up a new garden spot.

I hope you were not hurt, and I hope the damage to your machine, shed, and other equipment was not severe.

#7 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 06:59 AM

Rick,welcome to GTT,glad to have you with us.

#8 RailmanB110 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 11:11 AM

Been there & done that!
The problem usually starts when the tiller depth is sufficient for the strong arm lever's catch can fall off the end of the semi-circle plate. One solution is to put a bolt through the circle plate holes to limit the strong arm travel. This is what my brother in law did when he borrowed my tractor/tiller. What I did was become real familiar with releasing the tiller clutch, so as to be able to release without being in a panic. Looking back, I think an extension to the catch plate circle would be the safe thing to do. That way, the real wheels will always be in controll, & still have the option of a deep cut.
Joe
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#9 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 11:31 AM

Is your lift set up to where it applies down pressure? If it is, once it catches hard in the dirt, the tiller will ride up on top & lift your rear tires up enough to lose ALL traction & allow the tiller to do the driving. It definitely needs to be allowed to "float" if it isn't already. Weight the wheels too, and fill the rear tires. The more the better when tilling & plowing.
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#10 RailmanB110 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 11, 2011 - 11:43 AM

Daniel,
The way the lift is set up is that you push on the handle to lift the tiller. The problem is that the catch can drop off the end of the circle catch plate when digging deep. That is when you lose the float on the lift, & as you said, lift the rear wheels off the ground. Then, it's off to the races!
Joe
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