Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Reproduction plastic parts


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 Abomination OFFLINE  

Abomination
  • Member
  • Member No: 74550
  • 24 Thanks
  • 28 posts
  • Location: Missouri

Posted September 02, 2015 - 11:25 AM

Hi!

 

Has anybody on here ever 3-D scanned (and cleaned up) any of the plastic parts for these mowers?

 

If folks aren't, then why not?

 

Scanned and cleaned up plastic parts images could be printed for free by anybody with a 3D printer, and they could have that new dashboard pretty much instantly. 

 

It would be no different than someone scanning in decals and cleaning them up, so anybody could print them out and stick them on (assuming they had the right ink, and could print on the right kind of material).

 

Figured I'd ask. Busting up a dash would no longer be an issue, then... even if people could only print the dash in pieces and assemble later (although I'd email the file off to one of those custom print places, where they print it full-size and ship it to you, just like uploading pictures and having them printed and mailed to you, only with plastic bits).


  • MH81, boyscout862, TomLGT195 and 1 other said thanks

#2 MH81 ONLINE  

MH81

    Proud to be Deplorable

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 802
  • 27,269 Thanks
  • 28,606 posts
  • Location: N. W. PA

Posted September 02, 2015 - 11:29 AM

Enthusiasts don't always keep up with the latest tech trends. I know there are a couple of guys doing reproduction pieces, but I believe it's all injection or mold, not print.
Interesting concept.
  • boyscout862 said thank you

#3 glgrumpy ONLINE  

glgrumpy

    Getting Out!

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 8360
  • 6,651 Thanks
  • 6,464 posts
  • Location: Huntington, IN 46750 North East in State

Posted September 02, 2015 - 12:52 PM

yeah, that sounds like good idea. But, I'm sure there would be limited money doing that, or cost of dash very high. I don't know printers, only see in news stories, but don't think average guy would have one big enough to make items that big. I'm not sure how they work, plastics fed in or anything about them. Idea might just be ahead of it's time? If it was so easy, I'm sure the auto industry would be using it,  or maybe they are experimenting??



#4 crittersf1 OFFLINE  

crittersf1

    GT Lunatic

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 26142
  • 4,167 Thanks
  • 5,759 posts
  • Location: Newport, N.C.

Posted September 02, 2015 - 12:58 PM

GREEK to me



#5 chieffan ONLINE  

chieffan
  • Senior Member
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 62695
  • 6,146 Thanks
  • 4,491 posts
  • Location: SW Iowa

Posted September 02, 2015 - 01:10 PM

Sounds like 23rd century dreaming to me.



#6 Bill 76 ONLINE  

Bill 76
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 49625
  • 1,640 Thanks
  • 1,054 posts
  • Location: 5miles west of Milwaukee Wisconsin

Posted September 02, 2015 - 03:48 PM

You might be on to something here-auto makers and others have been using this for a while for making proto type parts.after doing a quick bit of reading on this I see no reason that it would not work if the right plastic was used in the printer.There seems to be a growing number of people with commercial made and home brew machines in their homes doing stuff like this,You would have to hunt one down and see it they could do it,Maybe a local tech collage would be a good place to start.Times are changing fast-what used to take a machinist days to make can now be done in hours.

I,am an old fart so it's way beyond my technical abilities but some of the kids out there today are really slick with this hi tech stuff.

keep us posted what you come up with.


  • Alc and boyscout862 have said thanks

#7 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

Bolens 1000

    DR. Bolens

  • Staff Admin
  • Staff
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 7
  • 12,680 Thanks
  • 17,200 posts
  • Location: Western NY

Posted September 02, 2015 - 04:00 PM

The size and quality of printer needed to make such parts for these GT's would far exceed what you would need to sell to even break even, The non prototype material you need is also very expensive and everyone I had the chance to play with does not make a smooth product but rather porous and rough.

 

I have never heard of scanning the part , all the 3d printers I have worked with require you do a drawing on programs like solid works , Cad ect......


  • Alc and boyscout862 have said thanks

#8 boyscout862 ONLINE  

boyscout862
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 8923
  • 9,763 Thanks
  • 7,532 posts
  • Location: N.E. Connecticut

Posted September 02, 2015 - 04:40 PM

Its a cool idea and may work best the way that Abomination said. Scan the dash and send the data to a 3D print shop. I would imagine that the scanned data would be valuable and you would want to guard it. The trick is to find the right equipment to scan the item. Then find a 3D printer that will use a material that is suitable.

A knowledgeable young person may be able to create a good business, for awhile. Eventually the scanners and printers will be cheap and popular. Good Luck, Rick

#9 Abomination OFFLINE  

Abomination
  • Member
  • Member No: 74550
  • 24 Thanks
  • 28 posts
  • Location: Missouri

Posted September 02, 2015 - 05:12 PM

This is the place I was talking about that will print anything you want in whatever material (even metal) that you want:

 

http://www.shapeways.com/create

 

You send them the file. They print it and mail it to you. 

 

If you want, you can even sell your item on their site, and they'll print it on-demand and drop ship it for you.

 

All we need now is for someone to 3-D scan some parts and have some college kid clean them up so everything is straight, etc...


  • Alc and Bill 76 have said thanks

#10 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

Chopperhed
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 20120
  • 1,852 Thanks
  • 1,071 posts
  • Location: Edmonton, Ab, Canada

Posted September 04, 2015 - 03:42 PM

I've only had experience with a couple of the 3d printers ( I want one, when I can afford one), but I know they can do smaller parts fairly well. with the right programs they can be pretty precise. I have a design to fill the steering column hole on the dozer, with holes for a pair or trio of indicator lights. The problem is large parts like the ford dash have too much area to print without a dual head printer. If they could be printed flat it would be simple, but because of the edges,  a support structure made of dissolvable material is needed. The second extruder prints the dissolvable material as the print is developed. other wise the center of the dash would sag during printing.

 

With a good dash as a pattern, I think it would be better to make a fiberglass mold.

 

the resulting material would be much stronger with better detail.

 

A injection mold would be very expensive but  would be nice.

 

Or even nicer would be having one CNC machined of aluminum, but extremely expensive.

 

I think fiberglass would be the only economical way to semi-mass produce an aftermarket dash and tunnel cover.


  • MH81 said thank you

#11 Chopperhed OFFLINE  

Chopperhed
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 20120
  • 1,852 Thanks
  • 1,071 posts
  • Location: Edmonton, Ab, Canada

Posted September 04, 2015 - 06:48 PM

This is the place I was talking about that will print anything you want in whatever material (even metal) that you want:

 

http://www.shapeways.com/create

 

You send them the file. They print it and mail it to you. 

 

If you want, you can even sell your item on their site, and they'll print it on-demand and drop ship it for you.

 

All we need now is for someone to 3-D scan some parts and have some college kid clean them up so everything is straight, etc...

I looked at the site, and they can only print up to 8" a piece n plastic. Anything larger would have to be assembled, usually by using adhesives to join the pieces. The process is pretty precise, and intricate pieces can be made, but production is costly.






Top