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1959 Bolens ride a matic restoration help


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#106 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 07:57 AM

An exacto (hobby) knife or a small utility knife usually work fairly well and are fairly easy to hold safely - use a hard wood (plywood) or plastic surface such as a kitchen cutting board under the gasket paper to support it.  Mark out where you want the hole and then use a round object such as a socket (various sizes up to 1" can usually be found in your tool box, lid off a paint or aerosol can, roll of black tape or use a compass from a geometry set for larger size holes) to get a nice round pattern to follow.  Don't apply too much pressure on the first time around the hole and this will give you a groove in the gasket material the knife will follow -  work your way around the circle a few times with the knife and it should give you a nice round hole.  On small bolt holes you can use a short piece of steel tubing (brake or fuel line depending on the size of hole) - once you cut the tubing to a short length (4" - 6") use a small round file and sharpen one of the ends at the edge so it will cut the gasket material and then use a slow speed drill or tap it lightly on the end with a wood mallet - turn the tube a little bit and tap again - after the tube has been turned around to a few positions the hole should be created.  Take a screwdriver or punch and push the piece of gasket material that is inside the steel tube out before you start to cut another hole or else you will have a tube full of gasket material that will be hard to push out as they will stack and bind.  If you had a hole saw kit you could try using them by hand as they may work as well. 

 

Most gasket paper comes as a roll which can be a pain to keep flat - a few spring loaded clamps and a flat piece of plywood or stiff cardboard will hold the gasket material flat while you lay out your gasket as shown in the picture.

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#107 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 11:28 AM

^ excellent tips - thank you so much!

I have a piece of 1/8 cork rubber here for the gear case halves. I don't have the original because it just fell apart (should have kept a small piece at least) but it seems way thicker than the original. I don't want to cut it and put it together only to have it be too thick.

This is the only pic I have where the original gasket can be seen. Could it have shrunken over time?

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#108 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted June 24, 2016 - 11:58 AM

I do not know what the original thickness was of the gasket material used - looking at your second picture there appears to be a wide piece above the large gear that has not been compressed so if you measure the thickness of it that should give you a good idea of how thick the original material was - hopefully you still have a piece of it somewhere.  You can buy rolls of gasket materials in various thicknesses that should work for you at a local automotive store.  Here is a link to the Felpro catalogue that will give you an idea of the thicknesses available - http://www.fme-cat.c...-16/#?page=1298 - other manufacturers can supply gasket material as well. 

 

If you do not have a piece of the original gasket left you could assemble the two have with the gears and shafts in place and see if there is a space between the two halves or if there is an air gap - this will give you an idea od how tight things are inside without the gasket.  If the two cases mate without a space between the two halves I would suggest that you go with 1/16" thick gasket material if you cannot find out the original gasket thickness if you think the original was thinner than what you have. 


Edited by 29 Chev, June 24, 2016 - 11:59 AM.

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#109 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2016 - 03:07 AM

I was able to adjust the gear box tonight without gasket and with 1/16 and it appears that 1/16 is the ticket. I need to finish cutting it out and I should have it all mounted up.

Would it be worth using some liquid gasket stuff and sealing around the axle tube? You can see a small gap in the attached pic.

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#110 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2016 - 02:19 PM

^Any thoughts on it a gasket should be used?^

Also with this attached pic do you have suggestions for seating the bushing? I'm thinking of trying a socket just smaller than the diameter of the sleeve. I broke some of the 3/8 threaded rod so should I use something thicker?

#111 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted June 27, 2016 - 02:53 PM

I guess it wouldnt hurt with some sealer if you have it, A socket the same size as the bushing should work nicely to get the bushing flush


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#112 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2016 - 09:08 AM

Well all of the bearings and bushings have been pulled but I had a hiccup replacing this one. I had a friend with a hydraulic press try and he said it wouldn't move. Could it have bottomed out or any other thoughts? Should I cut the last 1/4" off with a dremel?

EDIT. I think we're gonna use a mill and cut the bushing down.

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Edited by Manfjourde, June 28, 2016 - 10:37 AM.


#113 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2016 - 10:47 AM

Can any of you please enlighten me on the order or where these parts numbers need to be installed? I didn't document with pics and am having a hard time reading the manual. I can't tell where they go in conjunction with other parts.

Number 33 and 35. What do they go against? What are they next to?

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#114 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted June 28, 2016 - 06:01 PM

Im not sure as I never had one apart with the differential assembly :(

 

The thrust bearing should go up against a moving part , thats actually the part that will take the wear, the seal should go against the case cover to keep out the dirt


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#115 Bruce Dorsi ONLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2016 - 01:54 PM

Can any of you please enlighten me on the order or where these parts numbers need to be installed? I didn't document with pics and am having a hard time reading the manual. I can't tell where they go in conjunction with other parts.

Number 33 and 35. What do they go against? What are they next to?

 

I can't say for certain, but from the drawings, it appears axle #52 is keyed to #26 bevel gear.  ....Thrust bearing #33 rides against # 26 bevel gear. .....Seal # 35 fits into case #44.


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#116 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2016 - 07:25 PM

Thanks for the responses. I should have mentioned that part of the reason I'm confused is the old seal is the ID of the axle but seems like a pointless spot for a seal to go. I wish someone had one of these to pull the side off and take a peak for me:(

#117 Bolens 1000 ONLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2016 - 07:30 PM

I know this is no use to you now but in my early days of restoring I quickly learned to always document and take pics of gear assemblies and how they go.

 

Wish I had one here to check for you but I dont


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#118 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted June 29, 2016 - 07:33 PM

I know this is no use to you now but in my early days of restoring I quickly learned to always document and take pics of gear assemblies and how they go.

Wish I had one here to check for you but I dont


Believe me, lesson learned. My hands were all greasy and I just plowed through it. Never again.
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#119 Manfjourde OFFLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2016 - 02:06 AM

An update with a pic of progress. I really dislike buying hardware and its that much harder with the kids there. Anyway...

I can't get the woodruff key to seat in the axl for the differential gear. Any suggestions that have worked to get them in? I've sanded it and still do go.

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#120 29 Chev OFFLINE  

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Posted July 03, 2016 - 10:48 AM

Woodruff keys are designed to be a tight press fit so they do not move with side torque - movement would result in wear.  First suggestion would be to put the woodruff key in the freezer overnight before you try and install it - put it in a plastic zip lock bag with some ice cubes so you do not loose it and the ice cubes will keep it cold while you transport it to where you are going to install it  - the cold will make the key a tiny bit smaller. Label the bag so that no one else mistakes it for food.  Make sure the groove of the key seat in the axle is clean and does not have any crud or burrs - you can clean it out with a flat screwdriver or the end of a flat file.  Also make sure the woodruff key does not have any marks or burrs on the side of it.  You can usually press the key into the axle using a pair of vise grips - make sure the key is square and centred with the slot - set the screw on the vise grips so that squeezing the vise grips just starts the key into the slot a little bit.  The key will probably start to go in on one end more than the other so move the vise grips to apply pressure near the end that is not going in and slowly work your way from end to end until you get it seated tightening the screw on the vise grips a little bit each time to force the key down into the groove.  Once it is close to being seated level it using the vise grips until the edge of the key is parallel to the shaft so the gear will go over it - you can use a set of calipers or a micrometer to make sure both ends of the key are the same distance above the shaft.  Be gentle when using the vise grips as trying to force the key too much at once may end up marking the key or the shaft creating a burr in which case you will probably have to use a file to clean them up. 


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