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Covered Bridge


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#1 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 06:50 AM

This is a picture of the covered bridge that used to be here in Bridgetown Nova Scotia , taken early in 1907 .The town was named for the bridge.This is the town where I live. Note the sign on the bridge says:KEEP TO THE RIGHT & WALK YOUR HORSES OR YOU WILL BE FINED.

Posted Image

Edited by mjodrey, March 13, 2010 - 06:31 PM.


#2 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 07:15 AM

Is this bridge still in existence or has it been torn down since then?

#3 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 07:46 AM

Is this bridge still in existence or has it been torn down since then?


No, it is long long gone.

#4 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 08:19 AM

Ya that's what I figured but I wanted to ask anyway. It is a shame because all of the covered bridges were beautiful. One can only hope they preserve all the ones still in existence today.

#5 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 10:51 AM

That's a neat picture and one of the tallest covered bridges I've ever seen. Do you know how long it was, or how many spans?
Last fall, I discovered a covered bridge in Morrison, Illinois. It was built, new, around the year 2000. Steel beam support, but very authentic looking. It has a fire sprinkler system, and security cameras installed. It's a full two lanes wide, with a pedestrian walkway on the outside.

#6 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 11:25 AM

That's a neat picture and one of the tallest covered bridges I've ever seen. Do you know how long it was, or how many spans?
Last fall, I discovered a covered bridge in Morrison, Illinois. It was built, new, around the year 2000. Steel beam support, but very authentic looking. It has a fire sprinkler system, and security cameras installed. It's a full two lanes wide, with a pedestrian walkway on the outside.


The first bridge in Bridgetown was built in 1805,this was not a covered bridge.In 1870 a new covered bridge was built to replace the first one.A new iron bridge replaced the covered bridge in late 1907. This bridge was destroyed by a flood in 1920.Another iron bridge was then built to replace that one.This bridge was used right up to approximately 1990,and was then replaced by a modern concrete bridge , which is still in use.

Edited by mjodrey, March 13, 2010 - 12:14 PM.


#7 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 11:31 AM

Here are a couple of other views of that bridge.

Posted Image


Posted Image

Edited by mjodrey, March 14, 2010 - 05:57 AM.


#8 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2010 - 10:07 PM

Wow! Single span! There's got to be some massive timbers in there!

#9 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2010 - 08:09 AM

That might also explain why it didn't last too long either.

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2010 - 01:37 PM

That might also explain why it didn't last too long either.


Yes,you are probably correct on that.

#11 Bill56 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2010 - 02:00 PM

Yeah, that is a bit of a stretch, but I don't think too many of the covered bridges failed do to their design. I think most of their demise was do to floods, arson, over weight loads, or lack of maintenance on the roof and siding. There are still several of them standing in the state of Indiana.
There's a replacement covered bridge built, by hand, in Frankenmuth, Michigan. I don't remember the year it was built. Maybe in the 1970's or 80's. The town wanted it to be as authentic as possible. It was built on dry land, then slid into place, using oxen, just like the original bridge was.




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