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Guess I messed up big time


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 08:59 PM

Spent Friday and Saturday reclaiming the patch that has my tomatoes, tomatillos, egg plant and peppers.
The Giant Foxtail and Cockle Burrs had gotten about 5 ft tall.

After pulling and cutting for two days it looked pretty good.
But then a thunderstorm blew through last night.
When I got home from church I went out and found 7 tomatoes and 3 tomatillos blew over.
Taking out all the weed support may have been a mistake?

Spent a couple hours digging out 5&6 ft rebar stakes and drove them 2-3 ft in the ground to support the cages. The light wires folded up. I did not notice plants broken so am sure they will recover.
Next year I will not set a cage without staking it well!

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 09, 2015 - 09:01 PM.

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#2 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 09:04 PM

Organic cage stakes?
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#3 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 09:30 PM

Organic cage stakes?

Yeah that Fox tail is tough stuff!
Remember that illustration of breaking a twig, but try snapping a bundle.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 09, 2015 - 09:33 PM.


#4 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 10:05 PM

been there on that. I used to kill off all the jimson weeds, until I figured out one day that the horn worms like them better than the tomatoes.  We used to plant wheat in between the rows on melon plants to keep the wind from blowing the sandy ground and cutting them off. later on we would mow down the wheat rows.


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#5 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 10:21 PM

been there on that. I used to kill off all the jimson weeds, until I figured out one day that the horn worms like them better than the tomatoes. We used to plant wheat in between the rows on melon plants to keep the wind from blowing the sandy ground and cutting them off. later on we would mow down the wheat rows.

Wish I had sandy soil, my clay loam packs up badly, have not been able to get enough organic material in it.
I have a question for you.
How do you keep the melons and pumpkins in a row?
Mine have spread out so much you can not walk through it. I have to do something different next year.

I am going to try planting white clover between the rows next year as a living mulch.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 09, 2015 - 10:26 PM.

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#6 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 12:13 AM

I have given up trying to keep them in a row, use diversionary tactics instead. Plant them next to the end of the garden and turn them out onto the grass away from the garden. If the beggars want to roam, let them have at it. Or, plant them next to something that doesn't care if there's an invasion, like corn, sunflowers or the pea and bean trellises. If they get too ambitious, once they have set fruit trim the offending tendrils back to where you want them.
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#7 chieffan ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 04:06 AM

Spent Friday and Saturday reclaiming the patch that has my tomatoes, tomatillos, egg plant and peppers.
The Giant Foxtail and Cockle Burrs had gotten about 5 ft tall.

After pulling and cutting for two days it looked pretty good.
But then a thunderstorm blew through last night.
When I got home from church I went out and found 7 tomatoes and 3 tomatillos blew over.
Taking out all the weed support may have been a mistake?

Spent a couple hours digging out 5&6 ft rebar stakes and drove them 2-3 ft in the ground to support the cages. The light wires folded up. I did not notice plants broken so am sure they will recover.
Next year I will not set a cage without staking it well!

Re Bar is not a good stake material.  Not enough surface to hold in the ground.  A good hard rain it falls over too.  I use the light weight cattle panels to build the cages with.  The panel come in 16' lengths and about 4' high.  I make the cages 4 squares across and hold the corners with about 4 or 5 hog rings.  this allows then to fold flat for storage.  One steel fence post holds 2 cages if you set them so the corners meet in the center of your row.  Never had one blow over yet.  Squares are big enough to get a hand in and back out with a tomato.  Have used the same cage for at least 10 years now and only replaced a few hog rings each year.  Those store bought cages were made to sell, not hold up tomatoes.


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#8 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 04:27 AM

It is about irritating when you spend time to get the garden looking better. Just to realize you messed with the plant roots.
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#9 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 06:40 AM

Wish I had sandy soil, my clay loam packs up badly, have not been able to get enough organic material in it.
I have a question for you.
How do you keep the melons and pumpkins in a row?
Mine have spread out so much you can not walk through it. I have to do something different next year.

I am going to try planting white clover between the rows next year as a living mulch.

well you cant control vines very much. I plant on 5' row centers, and leave a walkway/road every 4 rows. you just have to work it from the outside half way across, but once the vines come on good you cant really get in there at all. If your weed control was good early you  shouldn't have many later on due to shading out. I only get about 3 pickings then the vines are damaged enough by having to walk in that it doesn't matter any more.  Not really a trade off with sandy vs loam. Your soil holds water , mine don't. Theres also not much OM in the sand either, you have to put it there constantly. I'd plant wheat on yours as it has a huge root system and will break up the soil better.


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#10 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 07:27 AM

 Those store bought cages were made to sell, not hold up tomatoes.

There is a reason those things are called peony cages. That's what they were originally made for.


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#11 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 08:15 AM

Re Bar is not a good stake material. Not enough surface to hold in the ground. A good hard rain it falls over too. I use the light weight cattle panels to build the cages with. The panel come in 16' lengths and about 4' high. I make the cages 4 squares across and hold the corners with about 4 or 5 hog rings. this allows then to fold flat for storage. One steel fence post holds 2 cages if you set them so the corners meet in the center of your row. Never had one blow over yet. Squares are big enough to get a hand in and back out with a tomato. Have used the same cage for at least 10 years now and only replaced a few hog rings each year. Those store bought cages were made to sell, not hold up tomatoes.

Thanks for the tip on the cages! Jo bought 14 of those nice fold flat cages from Gurneys This spring. They are not cheap, I think she said about $ 15.00 ea. One bent at the bottom the others just tipped over.
I use hog rings to put the Stock panel arch(6 panels long butted together on the narrow side) together that we plant the peas, pole beans and table cucumbers on.
I had thought of making cages with concrete webbing and wondered about using hog rings.
Yes I do have a couple dozen of the cheap cages and spend a few hours every spring brazing them back together and straightening.

M

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 10, 2015 - 08:18 AM.

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#12 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 08:50 AM

well you cant control vines very much. I plant on 5' row centers, and leave a walkway/road every 4 rows. you just have to work it from the outside half way across, but once the vines come on good you cant really get in there at all. If your weed control was good early you  shouldn't have many later on due to shading out. I only get about 3 pickings then the vines are damaged enough by having to walk in that it doesn't matter any more.  Not really a trade off with sandy vs loam. Your soil holds water , mine don't. Theres also not much OM in the sand either, you have to put it there constantly. I'd plant wheat on yours as it has a huge root system and will break up the soil better.


That explains a lot. I planted them on raised beds( made with my hiller) on 36 inch center.
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#13 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 08:57 AM

For both tomatoes and peonies I make cages out of cement reinforcement wire and hog rings as mentioned. The wire cuts easily with the long handled bolt cutters. Initially they are not pretty, but it doesn't take long for the plants to grow and cover the cages up.


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#14 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted August 12, 2015 - 07:40 PM

I bought some 2x4 welded wire fencing and made my own cages. It was a little work, but they're tough and will last forever.


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