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Just finished my first standard transmission rebuild.


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#1 classic ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 07:51 PM

The best part of rebuilding this transmission was sitting back and looking at it after I finished assembling it, HA! This transmission is for my Gard'n Mast'r Jr. Tractor and originally came out of a mid to late 30's Mopar. The bearings were in need of replacement and the gears were pitted due to water getting into the transmission. Also, some of the teeth on the gears were chipped from grinding gears. I used the gears and main shaft from a 1937 Plymouth transmission that I picked up. I also used the parking brake hub, hub flange, transmission top cover, and hardware from it. I installed new thrust washers, bearings, snap rings, gaskets, and output shaft seal. It wasn't hard to rebuild the transmission, but it was tedious and time consuming. I now have to rebuild a T92 and a T96 transmission. These transmissions would have been fine if it weren't for water getting into them. Keep your transmissions out of the rain, since the water destroys everything.

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Edited by classic, August 09, 2015 - 08:50 PM.

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#2 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 08:22 PM

Was it hard to find seals and bearings?



#3 classic ONLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 08:39 PM

The output shaft seal was easy to find. The input shaft seal is no longer made and was specially made by National years ago. The input shaft seal fits in a 2 1/2" bore and seals a 3/4" shaft. It's an odd size seal to say the least. The old input shaft seal was still doing a good job of keeping the oil in the transmission, so I reused it. I will eventually make a bushing to install in the transmission so I can use a seal that is readily available. Gasket sets are available, but I made my own. Rebuild kits are available which include thrust washers, mainshaft and cluster gear bearings, and snap rings. I bought the kit with these parts. The input shaft bearings and output shaft bearing are common and easy to find. New gears can be found, but luckily I didn't have to buy any. Gears are usually pricy when you come across them.

Edited by classic, August 09, 2015 - 08:41 PM.

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#4 artbuc OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 03:20 PM

Great job...looks like a real fun project. I could have taken it apart but would have never got it back together!
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#5 classic ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 04:57 PM

The rebuild was not as hard as you would think. Just take pics during disassembly, step by step.

#6 dodge trucker ONLINE  

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Posted August 31, 2015 - 12:23 PM

I have done a couple each of automotive automatic and stick trannys and seem to have had less problems with the sticks
They certainly don't seem to go bad near as often as the autos either.

Edited by dodge trucker, August 31, 2015 - 12:24 PM.

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#7 classic ONLINE  

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Posted September 03, 2015 - 12:43 AM

The biggest enemies of a standard transmission are low or dirty oil, water in the oil, or the operator grinding gears. There is a lot more to go wrong with an automatic, and the clutch packs and pump will eventually fail. I rebuilt an old GM TH350 transmission years ago and it wasn't too bad of a job. There is a fault in these old 30's Mopar transmissions,though. There is a hardened steel inside splined washer that retains a gear on the main shaft. Of the three transmissions that I disassembled, two of them had broken washers. I located a new washer, but after seeing two snap rings holding the gear in place on the third transmission, I opted to go with the snap rings. The snap rings won't break like the hardened washer.I don't know when or who installed the snap rings, but obviously it was a fix for the original hardened washer that was most likely broken. The transmission will function fine with a broken washer, but eventually the pieces of the washer start grinding up. In the pic below, you can see a broken washer, bits of a ground up broken washer, a new replacement washer, and the two snap rings I used instead of the new replacement washer. Here is a pic of the snap rings as I installed them.

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