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Cover Crop?


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#16 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 07:51 PM

My PawPaw used to broadcast field peas for the nitrogen and we would get peas out of it, too. He also planted by the signs and always had great gardens when others didn't. I wasn't smart enough then to learn the signs with him and when to plant what crops.
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#17 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 03:35 PM

My PawPaw used to broadcast field peas for the nitrogen and we would get peas out of it, too. He also planted by the signs and always had great gardens when others didn't. I wasn't smart enough then to learn the signs with him and when to plant what crops.


Did he plant by lunar cycle or did he read natural signs.?
Grandad always said it was time to plant corn when elm leaves were as big as a squirrels ear.

#18 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 04:35 PM

My parents usually like to go by the lunar cycle. Makes a difference in germination.
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#19 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 06:07 PM

What was your impression of the use of the groundhog(Ag radish)?
I have heard the tab roots go very deep and open the soil.

I didn't get them planted as soon as I wanted, but they went about a foot deep. I think they helped some for being late. A lot of farmers are using them around here now.


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#20 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted August 10, 2015 - 11:35 PM

Did he plant by lunar cycle or did he read natural signs.?
Grandad always said it was time to plant corn when elm leaves were as big as a squirrels ear.


I presume it was lunar. He talked about the signs being in the feet, in the breast, in the head. I know he planted root crops when the signs were in the feet. I can probably find what I need to learn in a Foxfire book.
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#21 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2015 - 05:42 AM

 

I didn't get them planted as soon as I wanted, but they went about a foot deep. I think they helped some for being late. A lot of farmers are using them around here now.

Do they leave them in the ground or pull them up for some kind of animal feed ?


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#22 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2015 - 01:53 PM

Nature will definitely let you in on the secrets if you know where to look, I prefer a scientific approach and use it . if your planting hundreds of acres ,then your definitely at the mercy of nature!! I plant small so I have better control.
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#23 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted August 11, 2015 - 06:22 PM

Do they leave them in the ground or pull them up for some kind of animal feed ?

They freeze and rot over winter. They do their "tillage" job, then make good organic matter.


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#24 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 12, 2015 - 08:57 AM

Do they leave them in the ground or pull them up for some kind of animal feed ?

. From what I have read they are a Japanese white radish, the seed runs over a $ 100 a pound for the premium select seed. Can not remember the name but it starts with a D. (looked it up, it is Daikon) The tillage radish I's not select it is a straight run and costs much less. Somewhere I read the roots could go down as much as 17ft.
So is edible. And the bulbs can get up to 24 inches long.
When they are let frost kill and decompose in the field they leave holes in the ground to allow water to penetrate deeper, loosens the soil and the foliage adds organic material.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 12, 2015 - 10:39 AM.

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#25 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted August 12, 2015 - 11:08 AM

Those things make the best coleslaw you will ever want to eat !! I grow them every year, you don't plant them early , or they bolt. They do grow big! And fast too. Russians love them because they keep well. I love the flavor, very unique, its like eating a cabbage mixed with a mild horseradish. Real tastey mixed with carrots and mayo and lots of black pepper.
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#26 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted August 30, 2015 - 08:35 PM

Somehow I missed the last few posts here . Learned a lot in this thread , I plowed the buckwheat and sorghum grass mix then tilled . I hope any of the buckwheat seeds still there germinate then I will till them under once more before planting winter rye
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#27 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 30, 2015 - 09:04 PM

Planed 5 lbs of buckwheat, where the corn, onions ,garlic and potatoes were 2 weeks ago.
Got a pretty good stand going considering the cool weather and. Rain we have got since.
Parts of the state north of here got over 8 inches of rain in a day.
Suppose to get into the upper 80s next week, so I expect the buckwheat to jump.
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#28 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted September 04, 2015 - 07:42 PM

Here's my soybeans for this year. Planted 1, 2, and 3 weeks ago.

 

My late green beans are in the third pic.

 

E.jpg D.jpg C.jpg B.jpg a.jpg


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#29 backwoods ONLINE  

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Posted September 21, 2015 - 11:27 AM

so from what i have read in my area that winter rye is the best cover crop  but since this is also my first year having a garden what do i need to do to prep the soil?



#30 JBRamsey OFFLINE  

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Posted September 21, 2015 - 02:33 PM

so from what i have read in my area that winter rye is the best cover crop  but since this is also my first year having a garden what do i need to do to prep the soil?


Clear off your old plants and disc it a little or hit with a cultivator. You don't have to do much and then broadcast your rye seed. You can go back over if you like but I never have. If you have deer around, set up a stand and have some fresh venison this winter. Deer will flock to it in the middle of the winter when nothing else is green.

If it starts to go to see next spring, just mow it down or disc it in. Any green manure makes a huge difference.
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