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Cover Crop?


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 03:45 PM

I am starting to wind down (harvest the garden).
which is leaving area of bare ground. That got me to thinking of ground cover, weed suppression and green manure.

Buckwheat matures in 35-45 days and looks like a good option.
Any other ideas?
What do you use.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 07, 2015 - 03:46 PM.

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#2 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 04:02 PM

I've used buckwheat and was pleased with it. I've also used winter rye and prefer its looks. Both presented problems with the seeds that get away. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 shorty ONLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 04:20 PM

My parents used rye. But then in a wet spring, it was hard to get ahead of it. I use leaves and grass clippings to cover for the winter.
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#4 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 04:46 PM

I have heard winter rye, but buckwheat was not so highly talked of. Great question , because I will be doing that in about two months time. Noel
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#5 coldone OFFLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 04:49 PM

I sowed Buckwheat about 4 weeks ago in my nongarden area, not as acover crop but for the bees.


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#6 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 04:53 PM

I sowed Buckwheat about 4 weeks ago in my nongarden area, not as acover crop but for the bees.

That is a great point. Good Luck, Rick


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#7 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 05:03 PM

I used to use buckwheat, the hollow stems till in well when you're ready.


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#8 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 05:14 PM

Buckwheat is very good for the soil when worked back in, but can be invasive. Just try to work it in before it sets seed. Easier said than done, lol.


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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 07:29 PM

I sowed Buckwheat about 4 weeks ago in my nongarden area, not as acover crop but for the bees.

I used to keep bees and planted 2 acres of white clover 5. Yrs ago.
Have yet to set the hives up again. Will need to build all new frames. Still have the medium boxes.
I do hope to set up two hives next spring.
Clover makes an almost clear amber honey.
As I recall buckwheat makes a very dark honey.
It does make good bee forage and produces lots of pollen at the end of the season when other good pollen producers are playing out.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 07, 2015 - 08:11 PM.

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#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 08:10 PM

Buckwheat is very good for the soil when worked back in, but can be invasive. Just try to work it in before it sets seed. Easier said than done, lol.

That is what I need! My soil gets so compacted I need to work tons of organic material worked in to loosen it up.
I have been tilling in the grass mulch at the end of the season for 5 yrs now and it is getting better, but it needs more.

Yes I have heard about the invasive thing. I once read an article about a township out east, I think Pennsylvania that was suing a resident who had sowed many acres in buckwheat and never harvested it or mowed. And it had become a noxious weed spreading all over the area..

You know sunflower is grown as a field crop in some areas and is the state flower in Kansas and is protected. In Iowa it is considered a noxious weed by the state.

Edited by JD DANNELS, August 07, 2015 - 08:21 PM.

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#11 JBRamsey ONLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 10:01 PM

I use winter rye or wheat. Whatever I can find. I sew it heavy and if it starts to seed before I till it in, I mow it.
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#12 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted August 07, 2015 - 10:07 PM

I planted buckwheat this year in my main 36 x 50 foot garden area because I was tired of the weeds that took over .I let it flower , cut it down with the JD 318 . Either I should have let it dry more or did a better job shreading it because it wrapped around the tiller too much so I ended up kind of raking and then running it though the chipper .blowing back into the garden . Broadcasted some sorgham grass with it ,then lightly till , packed down with the 318 . It,s coming up pretty nicely , I plan on tilling it before it seeds again and put rye for the winter. Hope it will help with the weeds next year.
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#13 freedhardwoods OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 02:58 PM

I've planted soybeans for years for the nitrogen gain. I planted Ground Hog Radishes last year. You're only supposed to plant it every three years though. - http://www.ampacseed.com/groundhog.htm


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#14 boyscout862 OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 06:58 PM

That is what I need! My soil gets so compacted I need to work tons of organic material worked in to loosen it up.
I have been tilling in the grass mulch at the end of the season for 5 yrs now and it is getting better, but it needs more.

Yes I have heard about the invasive thing. I once read an article about a township out east, I think Pennsylvania that was suing a resident who had sowed many acres in buckwheat and never harvested it or mowed. And it had become a noxious weed spreading all over the area..

You know sunflower is grown as a field crop in some areas and is the state flower in Kansas and is protected. In Iowa it is considered a noxious weed by the state.

About 35 years ago I was an Army Officer and visited Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas. One of the guys had a poster that said: SKI KANSAS. It showed an angry guy in a sunflower field chopping down sunflowers with a ski. Good Luck, Rick


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#15 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 09, 2015 - 07:29 PM

I've planted soybeans for years for the nitrogen gain. I planted Ground Hog Radishes last year. You're only supposed to plant it every three years though. - http://www.ampacseed.com/groundhog.htm


What was your impression of the use of the groundhog(Ag radish)?
I have heard the tab roots go very deep and open the soil.




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