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Do you want biscuits for dinner, but don't want to turn on oven on a hot day ?


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#1 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 10:53 AM

Make them and cook them in your BBQ !!!!! And have your favorite soup with them. Yummie. Noel.

I only peeked at them once while cooking !!!

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#2 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 12:08 PM

How many ohms should they have when they are done?


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#3 Jazz ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 12:08 PM

What if you don't have a bbq. We put bannock dough on a stick and roast over fire. This time of year we can pick blueberries or saskAtoons to put in dough for extra flavour. Bannock is a staple when camping. No need to haul bread with you.
Agreed though the chief cook and bottle washer does like to use bbq when it's stinking hot
We have our awning ,,,yes I know it's just a tarp but it reflects heat from house and offers shade. Been tarpoligists for decades

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Edited by Jazz, August 03, 2015 - 12:09 PM.

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#4 Talntedmrgreen OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 12:42 PM

There isn't much you can't cook on the grill...I can't even remember what my oven looks like by June each year  :thumbs:


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#5 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 02:30 PM

What if you don't have a bbq. We put bannock dough on a stick and roast over fire.

I tried making bannock from a recipe once. Is it supposed to be like a pancake? Mine was kind of like a rock. However, fry bread is very good.


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#6 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 02:43 PM

You even use my brand of margarine--- must be a Canadian thing, lol. Good looking biscuits, light and fluffy. Back in the day 65 years ago, ( yeah, I started young, don't even go there!) I learned to make bannock in the top of the flour sack. Make a little well in the flour, pour in the melted fat, could be bear grease, bacon drippings from the frying pan, lard, whatever, add water, or milk if you had it, sprinkle a handful of flour with salt and baking powder on top and mulch it up with your hand until it was the right "feel". Then you flipped the ball of dough out of the flour sack into your other hand, patty caked it into a round and dropped it onto the top of the woodstove, flipped it once, and smeared it with more bear fat or---- Heavens above, honey! It worked well wrapped around a stick and cooked over the campfire too. If you were careful/skilled/lucky enough, you could pull the stick out without breaking the bannock and fill the hole with jam or honey. Guaranteed to make a horrible mess in the hands of a five year old, but Oh, the memories! They were good times, when we were muskrat poor and lived in the bush.
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#7 KC9KAS ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 03:49 PM

Mamma made biscuits on the grill many, many times when the whole family went camping!

Also made stew in the Dutch oven!


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#8 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 03:51 PM

There isn't much you can't cook on the grill...I can't even remember what my oven looks like by June each year  :thumbs:


And people did it for untold years before anyone made what was called a grill.
The old wood stoves were little more.
The wife tells about her grandfather buying her grandmother a gas stove.
She did not like it, and as soon as he went to the field, she had the boys bring her wood stove back into the kitchen.
When he took it out the second time he had the boys break it up with a sledge hammer.
See the genetics I have been dealing with for 44 yrs?
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#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 03:53 PM

Mamma made biscuits on the grill many, many times when the whole family went camping!
Also made stew in the Dutch oven!


There is nearly a lost art form, in Dutch Oven cooking.
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#10 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 03:58 PM

How many ohms should they have when they are done?


Do not think they are Ohms at all? More like lip smackin, finger lick n MMMs.
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#11 Jazz ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 04:00 PM

Bannock is generally about the same consistency of biscuits as in "biscuits and gravy" Sits heavy in your belly.

 

Bannock BUTTERED up MMMM,,NOT MARGARINE!,,,you ever left margarine out in the sun for a week?  Nothing happens to it...the flies won't even eat it...


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#12 propane1 ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 04:54 PM

Very true about the margarine. But I don't do the shopping, you know what I would get told if I said any thing. It's easy to use too. But a much different taste. A lot of water in it. Noel.

#13 LilysDad ONLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 05:19 PM

Very true about the margarine. But I don't do the shopping, you know what I would get told if I said any thing. It's easy to use too. But a much different taste. A lot of water in it. Noel.

Did you ever try to put melted margarine on pop corn? The pop corn just shrivels up from the water.


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#14 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted August 03, 2015 - 06:10 PM

You even use my brand of margarine--- must be a Canadian thing, lol. Good looking biscuits, light and fluffy. Back in the day 65 years ago, ( yeah, I started young, don't even go there!) I learned to make bannock in the top of the flour sack. Make a little well in the flour, pour in the melted fat, could be bear grease, bacon drippings from the frying pan, lard, whatever, add water, or milk if you had it, sprinkle a handful of flour with salt and baking powder on top and mulch it up with your hand until it was the right "feel". Then you flipped the ball of dough out of the flour sack into your other hand, patty caked it into a round and dropped it onto the top of the woodstove, flipped it once, and smeared it with more bear fat or---- Heavens above, honey! It worked well wrapped around a stick and cooked over the campfire too. If you were careful/skilled/lucky enough, you could pull the stick out without breaking the bannock and fill the hole with jam or honey. Guaranteed to make a horrible mess in the hands of a five year old, but Oh, the memories! They were good times, when we were muskrat poor and lived in the bush.


"Muskrat poor and lived in the bush", two of my Great Uncles, brothers left Iowa when they were young men.
Went to Canada and farmed for many years. Both returned to Iowa and lived out their lives.
Both were pretty wealthy in their old age, Scotsmen who could squeeze a penny till it squealed.
Great Uncle Bob could spin a yarn with the best.
Here is one he told my wife and I at a family reunion.
"there is a Fur Trapper who lives down the road. I being a person who likes to try new things, would often see what he had skinned.
I brought home some muskrat and fried it up and I think it tastes better than chicken.
In fact I used the same skillet, that the chicken we brought today was fried in."
His wife who had a dry sarcastic sense of humor, said, now Bob I know I have washed that skillet several tine since you ate Muskrat.
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#15 Jazz ONLINE  

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Posted August 04, 2015 - 03:34 AM

Did you ever try to put melted margarine on pop corn? The pop corn just shrivels up from the water.

If it makes popcorn shrivel up imagine what else it may effect.  Nope,,would not take a chance on the stuff. In fact I stock up on butter when I go to Minnesota every month because it is of better quality than is available locally. Our Canadian brands have more water in them. Not as good for baking.  We water down our butter but not our BEER!


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