Jump to content

Nominations for Tractor of the Month
Garden Tractors and Parts on eBay



Photo
- - - - -

Air Compressor Tank Question


  • Please log in to reply
11 replies to this topic

#1 FixItCharlie OFFLINE  

FixItCharlie
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 47950
  • 357 Thanks
  • 257 posts
  • Location: Aurora,IL

Posted July 28, 2015 - 05:32 PM

Earlier this summer the motor on my air compressor died. This one I built from parts I bought from an industrial motor shop auction & some other places. The compressor was 3 horsepower & the nice thing about was it was on 80 gallon vertical tank. I started checking different places to find a replacement or parts to fix this one. I found an air compressor on EBay for $220 that is a 6 horsepower Craftsman. It would have cost me more to replace the motor on the old one so I bought it.

 

  Compressor.jpg

 

Now the question my original thought was to take the tank from the old compressor & plumb it to the new compressor to add more air storage. The new compressor does recover very fast even running a die grinder & most other air tools that I have. I do not have any sandblasting tools & really do not know at this point in time if I will ever try to do this. So do I use this old tank for extra air storage or another thought use it to make a large lawn roller. The old tank looks good inside but is 40 years old. To make the lawn roller some fitting on the sides would need to removed & filled. So I am trying to decide which is the best way to go & am looking for suggestions.

 

Charlie



#2 JBRamsey ONLINE  

JBRamsey
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 61995
  • 971 Thanks
  • 586 posts
  • Location: North Carolina

Posted July 28, 2015 - 06:24 PM

You can never have too much volume. If you have the space, I would plumb into it for the extra volume. It's not like it's going to cost you anything.
  • Alc said thank you

#3 tater195 ONLINE  

tater195

    I dont deny your history..... dont deny mine

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62468
  • 1,306 Thanks
  • 933 posts

Posted July 28, 2015 - 06:54 PM

I dont have any pics (ac is buried in the shed), but I did something similar. I had an AC with a 2 gallon tank. Not sure what it was used for.. air nailer, air brush?? It was made back in the 60's. I had a 20 gallon tank from a well water system and found a shopping cart laying next to the highway (in the walmart parking lot at 2am). I cut the basket off the top and welded some tabs to the water tank to bolt up the compressor. I had a valve that could block off the big tank for fast pressure or let air in for longer pressure. The big tank held pressure good and I could use it for short term storage for air without starting the pump. It took longer to fill the total system, but would hold the pressure longer for running impacts, etc. It takes longer to recover with more tank, but it lasts longer, so its a 50/50 kind of thing.


  • Alc said thank you

#4 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,437 Thanks
  • 1,895 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted July 28, 2015 - 09:59 PM

I had a friend ask me to paint a barn a few years ago. Way away from any electric, so I went looking for a cheap gas powered compressor on CL.  I found one, 5HP Briggs powered wheelbarrow style with 2 "hotdog" tanks for around $100. I had to clean the points and clean the carb as it had sat a while, but once I had it running I found that both tanks liked to spring leaks. Braze one, 6 more pop up.  I went back to CL, and found a much newer Craftsman "oilless" piece of crap (even when it did run these units are garbage)  with a dead motor.

I cut the motor platform off of both, and welded the hotdog compressor platform to the oiless compressor's tank, which was 30 gallons where the hotdog tanks were 8 lbs combined capacity.  I have been running this as my backup compressor for about 5 years now.

I finally got my motor into/out of the electric motor repair shop that is on my 5HP 80 gallon upright compressor that has been dead for a couple years now so the gas one can truly go back to "reserve/backup" status again.



#5 tater195 ONLINE  

tater195

    I dont deny your history..... dont deny mine

  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 62468
  • 1,306 Thanks
  • 933 posts

Posted July 28, 2015 - 10:05 PM

 

I finally got my motor into/out of the electric motor repair shop that is on my 5HP 80 gallon upright compressor that has been dead for a couple years now so the gas one can truly go back to "reserve/backup" status again.

 

 

Just being nosey.. what did the rebuild cost? I had one crap out , (possibly the starting capacitor, but who knows) and I bought one from the farm store I bought the compressor from for around $135. I still have the old one and would like to get it repaired for a spare



#6 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,437 Thanks
  • 1,895 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted July 28, 2015 - 10:19 PM

It had a capacitor or 2 bad and something else (I forget what)  Bearings were good, motor was "brushless' (motor guy says they have been that way since the '50s)  I know it wasn't an issue with the windings or the armature. About 6 months ago this cost me $90  Just been spinning my wheels and have not had the time to rewire it back in. I did move it into my garage from my shed, where I last had it wired in from  but the shed is on the opposite end of the house and though I liked not having to hear the compressor banging away while in the garage, I was tired of running 100' of air hose across the front yard  every time I worked on anything, 

 For 3 seasons a year, I basically left it there until it was time to mow then I'd roll it up just long enough to get the grass mowed....

 

I paid $500 for the compressor about 15 years ago was a "backup" at one time from a body shop, I have used the snot out of it, sandblasting and more. Never could "run it out of air" no matter what I have had connected to it.  At the time I bought it, I went to a local place that services industrial compressors looking for filters for it,  and was asked if I wanted to double my $$///  the compressor shop owner offered to buy it from me sight unseen,  mine is an '87 model  Emglo 5HP 80 gallon upright, with a 4 cylinder 2 stage pump, at the time I got it (back around Y2k) they still made the same exact unit, and at that time it was a $2200 compressor. I had to replace the output line from the 2nd stage to the tank about 10 years ago, had a piece made out of stainless braided line. Besides that and a few oil changes and air filter replacements this is the 1st real issue I have had with it.    It runs off of single phase 220V.

 

My last "big" compressor was a '50s Champion, that was nowhere near as powerful,  that I had at my old house and sold when I moved here in '98.  I replaced the motor on that one back around '95-96ish and paid like $200 for a "compressor duty" motor at the time, from Northern Hydraulics. The same compressor guy that offered to buy my current compressor  told me at the time, that even rings were NLA for that old of Champion compressor pump, so to "get what use that I could" out of it.


Edited by dodge trucker, July 28, 2015 - 10:24 PM.

  • Alc said thank you

#7 dodge trucker ONLINE  

dodge trucker
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 19314
  • 1,437 Thanks
  • 1,895 posts
  • Location: kankakee

Posted July 28, 2015 - 10:35 PM

but more in line with the OP's question about the reserve tank, I'd say "go for it".  

I have thought of putting a horiz. tank in the garage attic, and doing like you say//// only my thoughts were to mount this reserve tank in my attic and build an "outhouse" sized enclosure behind the garage  just for my compressor and current 80 gallon upright tank.

maybe someday.



#8 Bill 76 OFFLINE  

Bill 76
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 49625
  • 1,639 Thanks
  • 1,054 posts
  • Location: 5miles west of Milwaukee Wisconsin

Posted July 28, 2015 - 11:33 PM

I'm with the go for it also but I would put a swing valve between the two tanks,that way you got the added volume if needed and if you don't need it  your compressor won't have to refill it every time you use your compressor for the small jobs. 


  • Alc said thank you

#9 Alc ONLINE  

Alc

    Tractorholic

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Contributor
  • Member No: 1094
  • 5,445 Thanks
  • 6,611 posts
  • Location: Bangor Pa

Posted July 29, 2015 - 05:37 AM

Boy you guys have some good ideas !!  Just adding a shut off to the extra tank so you don't have to fill it unless needed :thumbs:



#10 WNYTractorTinkerer ONLINE  

WNYTractorTinkerer

    Tinker Master

  • Senior Member
  • -GTt Supporter-
  • Member No: 10789
  • 8,302 Thanks
  • 4,657 posts
  • Location: Avon, NY

Posted July 29, 2015 - 06:05 AM

I have that exact compressor as a spare in my barn.. I really don't like it because:

A- It's oil free
B- It's noisy as all get out!

So if your recover time is poor on yours you can rebuild that unit fairly easily. You replace both the pistons and the cylinders and your volume loss while running will much less so your recovery time will improve. I did quite a bit of painting and sanding and what-not with mine and noticed the same problem with slow recovery and it worked like a charm. I just prefer the quieter unit I have in use now since I RESURRECTED it.


Good Luck!
  • Alc said thank you

#11 FixItCharlie OFFLINE  

FixItCharlie
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 47950
  • 357 Thanks
  • 257 posts
  • Location: Aurora,IL

Posted July 29, 2015 - 09:19 PM

One mistake I made in the original post but is not really important. The used tank from my old compressor is a 60 gallon not 80 gallon. As far as recovery rate this compressor is a lot faster then the old one. I have yet to time it but it seems like it only 10 minutes to go from zero pressure to full pressure of 125 psi. One test I made was use my die grinder at 90 psi when the compressor was down to 100 psi it started running as designed. I continue to use the die grinder to see how the compressor would keep up. It not only kept up but did recover pressure to 125 psi. & shut off. I agree with everyone having extra compressed air storage can have its advantages, but when you have a compressor that can keep up with all the air needs for the equipment be used with it is adding extra air really over kill. As far as noise this compressor does not seem to be as noisy as my old one was. So with all the remarks that have been posted I am thinking  putting plugs in all of the open ports on this tank & store this tank for now. Any other suggestions on storing a tank to preserve it. I know with scuba tanks it is recommended to keep at least 100 psi of air in them for storage but the air used in them has gone through a drying process so leaving air would prevent moisture in them. Thank you every one for the suggestions & ideas for setting it up.

 

Charlie


  • Alc said thank you

#12 FixItCharlie OFFLINE  

FixItCharlie
  • Senior Member
  • Member No: 47950
  • 357 Thanks
  • 257 posts
  • Location: Aurora,IL

Posted August 30, 2015 - 09:41 PM

I got something today at HF for a few other jobs but decided to look inside this.

 

Inspection Camera.jpg

 

As I stated in the first post this is a forty year old tank.

 

Air Tank.jpg

 

What I found was a lot of rust this camera does not store video & I tried to capture some shots but did not have a lot of luck. I did find a lot of rust on the sides  could not get to the bottom to see how much rust is there. My thoughts right is maybe better to find some other use for this tank as at this time I do not have the extra room at this time to set up for extra air storage. At this time I think I will just store it away outside until I have some more time to work on it.

 

Charlie


  • Alc said thank you




Top