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New workshop/shed


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#1 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 06:03 AM

I've been working on a new workshop / shed for a month or so now. I thought I'sd share some pics and thoughts on the process. I have never built anything this large on my own from the ground up. It's been more work and $$ then I thought it would be.
I wanted a space that could be heated so I could work in it in the winter. I had planned to add on to the back of the garage but the available space back there limited me to maybe 14x8 ft. After discussing it with my wife Vel, we decided to put the new shed to the left and in front of the garage. We needed to move some large rocks at the corner of the driveway to still allow us to maneuver the car with the new shed in place. Luckily, there was an excavator working a few lots up the road and the operator was a great guy, he moved the rocks, dug out the area for the shed, pulled out a stump and was gone in 45 minutes.
Next was plotting out the position of the 6 concrete posts that would support the building. I ended up squeezing in a 16x10ft building into the available space. It's a snug fit. Next, dig the holes. Not easy in this area. It turns out that this spot seems to have been where they buried a lot of rocks when the house was built. I ran into big rocks in almost every one of the 6 holes. I ended up having to move the posts lengthways and adjust the cantilever for the support beams to get a square base. I didn't take any pictures during this time. I bought a Dewalt laser level to help with levelling things but it was pretty much useless in the sun. I did some research and got a pair of the orange"laser enhancing glasses" and they helped a lot, allowing you to use the level over the 16ft length of the building. I got the holes as deep as I could and poured footings with rebar sticking out. One of the holes is only about 20" deep but is sitting on a huge rock. I will insulate on top of the ground around that one when I fill in to the final grade. All the others are between 3 and 4 feet down. I poured the posts and made another mistake. I didn't carefully level the tops of the posts when i installed the J bolts. I ended up spending a couple of hours of quality time with an angle grinder / masonry disc to get them level so the beams would sit nice and flat on them.
I decided to go with 2X8 joists on 16", joist hangers and laminated 4 beams of 3 2x8's to span the 7 feet or so between the posts. It was a lot of work laminating the beams, 2 large tubes of PL premium, 300 3" deck screws and a bunch of 3-1/2" framing nails. At about this time I began to realize how physically hard this type of work is, especially when you are 54 and out of shape. The beams were glued and screwed on a wolmanized 2x6 sill plate.
Heres some pics of the setup.

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Since I wanted to heat this space I needed to insulate the floor. I decided to put the FG insulation in the floor at this point. I knew this meant I would need to keep the floor from getting wet. I bought a large tarp to help with that. I strapped the bottom of the joists, screwing the strapping on. Next, I wanted to add building paper (Tyvek) to the bottom to protect the insulation. I will be skirting around the sides with wolmanized plywood. It was a miserable job getting the Tyvek stapled to the bottom of the joists. I didn't think it through very well. I ended up putting cardboard on the ground and slithering around under there with a staple gun while my wife held the tyvek tight. Next, the insulation was added. 2x r12 in each cavity. Then the floor, 3/4 OSB was glued and nailed to the joists. Now it was starting to look like we were getting somewhere.

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I'll get back with another update later
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#2 Buddy OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 06:15 AM

Looking good. Wish I was good working with wood.


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#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 06:16 AM

That's going to be a very nice shed when you are done Brian.
You'll be glad you decided to go heated.
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#4 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 06:29 AM

Thanks Guys. I'm going to have a 5ft wide set of doors in the end facing away from the garage. You can see that end in the picture with the yellow utility pole anchor coming down through the right side of the picture. It ended up being a lot higher than I thought so I am needing to fill in in front of where the door will be to bring it up close to the level of the shed floor. I am thinking of making a short ramp attached to the building with dock brackets so the bottom end can float. Haven't fully figured that out yet. I'm going to feed power out from a panel in the garage. I should probably put a 240v welder outlet out there as well as lights/plugs. I have a man door for the other end and 2- 48w x36H windows to go in the front, which faces pretty much south. That should give me lots of natural light and heat gain in the winter. Being only 36" high they will fit over top of workbench height.  

   This project has been a challenge. I have done some carpentry over the years. I have text books, but most of them date from the 70s. I like to do things old school, but modern materials are different. One thing that has been a real shock is the price of screws and nails. A couple pound box of framing nails is like 25$ here. 


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#5 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 06:59 AM

Next  was to put the walls up. I went with 2x4 on 16" and full 8ft high walls. That makes the shed look a bit tall but gives lots of headroom inside. I had decided to build a rafter roof. Like I said earlier, old school. 2x4 rafters on 16" may be overkill but after the snow loads we had here last winter I didn't went to scrimp. Since 2X4s are a bit floppy on a 10ft span I went with 2x6 ceiling joists. I then made a mistake and put them at 24" figuring that would be fine because trusses are normally on 24". I forgot that you normally nail the ceiling joists to the rafters at the plate to keep the walls from spreading. So I had to add collar ties on the rafters. Luckily I had the spare lumber to do that. More work though. If doing it again I would use trusses. Not sure what they cost but it sure would be much less work. The slope is 6/12 to match the house and garage. Sheathing was 7/16" osb. 

 

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A couple of curious visitors/ building inspectors dropped in. 

 

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#6 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 07:02 AM

That looks real good, Brian! Should be a very nice shop for you!


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#7 BTS ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 07:28 AM

That all looks great!, I'm wanting to build a 20X25 that I can heat a cool.
Keep up the good work and updates.

Thanks


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#8 camdigger ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 08:05 AM

Looks pretty good!

If it were me ( and it ain't), I'd use 2 x 6 for the collar ties across the base of the rafters and 1/2" sheet material to box in an attic storage area. At 10' wide and 6-12 pitch, you'd have 4' 4" or so max height, but would gain 60 or so sq ft of storage space. Local to me codes require an attic access anyway. Leaving one just a little larger and providing a steep stair or ladder gives access to the storage. Not for daily access, but for once a year storage for fishing rods or those treasured hoards of parts for antique tractors....
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#9 Alc ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 08:06 AM

Brain that shed is better built then most new homes lol   Great job :thumbs:


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#10 tiretrx OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 08:22 AM

That's coming along real well. Nicely done!


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#11 WNYTractorTinkerer OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 08:33 AM

Brain that shed is better built then most new homes lol   Great job :thumbs:

BRAIN?!?!  

 

6/12 pitch is pretty steep!!   :reading_the_manual:

 

Have fun roofing that one!


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#12 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 08:48 AM

It's coming along nicely.  I'm sure you'll like the extra space.  Heated too?  Great!


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#13 hamman OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 09:51 AM

Looks great. I'm sure that it will be a great shop / shed for you. Are you going to use shingles or metal roof up there? If I had it to do over again I would use metal roofing on my garage. Makes for less snow load when it slides off.  Keep the pictures coming . Looking forward to seeing the completed project.               Roger


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#14 HDWildBill OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 10:36 AM

That is looking really good!  Don't worry about the mistakes, just learn from them and go on.  When you are done you will have a lot of joy in knowing that you built the workshop.  I think it will server you well for many, many years to come.


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#15 Cat385B ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 10:46 AM

That's going to be very nice GT shed, Brian.
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