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100 year old tool to reline the Gard'n Mast'r Jr. shoes.


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#1 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 07:59 PM

I bought this old rivet tool at a yard sale years ago and forgot that I had it. I picked up some old brake linings and rivets so that I could reline my brake shoes myself. I made my own rivet punch and had trouble with the rivets splitting, so I put the project on the back burner until I could get the right tool for the job. When I came across the old rivet press while looking for something else, I decided to give it a try. The old rivet tool was a hunk of rust and nothing moved on it. I used a torch and heated things up to disassemble it. I cleaned everything up, reassembled it, and tested it on a rivet. Well, even with this tool the rivet split. I did some research online and found other people having the same splitting problems. One person mentioned annealing the old brass rivets and that this would solve the splitting problems. I took a map gas torch and heated the rivets until the surface of the rivets turned a dark orange color. I tried pressing the annealed rivet and sure enough, no splitting. I then went ahead and started to reline one of the shoes with the annealed rivets and had no problems. In the pic below of the rivets, you can see the split rivet that was not annealed, and the rivet that was annealed and did not split. I probably wouldn't have learned any of this if I wasn't into the GT hobby....just another excuse to stay in it, HA!

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#2 petrj6 OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 08:14 PM

     Very nice !!  that tractor is going to be brand new when you get done.  you going to have it ready for the fall Hudson show ?  Dad is already asking about it, wants to bring his allis down there to show it of.

             Pete


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#3 stiemmy ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 08:22 PM

I'll be darned!!

Guess we all benefit from this one. Thank you for sharing. :)
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#4 DennyIN ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 08:43 PM

Lubricate the punch that upsets the rivet and that will help the rolling action of the rivet. Where I used to work we bought brass tubular rivets and they were coated with a wax that assisted in the roll clinch, plus we lubricated the punch or pilot that upsets or rolls the rivet. 


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#5 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 09:18 PM

Pete, I'm trying my best to get these two tractors done for the fall show. It's a monumental task completely rebuilding these machines as you already know. I will be going to the show and will be bringing something with me, I'm sure. I thought that what I went through with the riveting excursion would be useful and thought it would be a good idea to post it here. I read that the main problem with old brass rivets splitting is because the brass hardens with age. I'm not a metal expert, so I don't know if there's any truth to it. I did try putting grease on the rivet, but it still split. Annealing the rivet was the only way to make it work.
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#6 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 10:18 PM

This works because of the copper in the rivet.
Thanks for sharing, nice tool and a great piece of advice.
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#7 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 12:38 AM

Thanks for the info Alan, and you're welcome. Annealing does soften the rivet, so I don't know if it would be wise to do for an on the road vehicle application. I don't think I'll be slamming on the brakes on pavement at 55mph with this garden tractor. If I end up in that situation, I'm either doing something wrong, or I've had one too many.
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#8 classic ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 12:52 AM

I just wanted to mention that this tool is one of those yard sale items that I've picked up just because I liked the look of it. I never thought I'd actually be using the thing many years later. I have to make my own brake bands for my Mighty Mite tractor and I'll be using this tool again to line the bands. NAPA here in town quit relining brake shoes and brake bands a while back, and there is nobody here locally that does them.
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#9 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 02:32 AM

I picked up a complete Sears cheap set many years ago. It fit into a vise and had the drill bits to. It worked great for relining the brake bands of my old shoveldozer. A friend with the same dozer borrowed the tool but then died before returning it. I needed the tool again for a big tractor so, I made one. There is a clamp that plumbers use to clamp onto steel beam flanges. I made an anvil for the bottom and a peening head for the top. It is driven with a hammer. It worked. Good Luck, Rick 


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