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Any Roto-Hoe collectors in the Puget Sound area?


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#1 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 17, 2015 - 12:45 PM

Just found the site. I recently picked up some old stuff that belonged to my late dad:  two Sears Suburban tractors from the mid-'60s (flat rear fenders), one with original HH100 Tecumseh, and one that I'd guess had been re-engine (this site is correcting my spelling when it should not; the last word needs a d on the end to be past-tense) with an OH140 Tecumseh by the original owner. Also, a bunch of implements. And I picked up Dad's walk-behind Sears rototiller from the mid-'70s, and a very old Roto-Hoe tiller.  I used to keep all this stuff running and repaired, and though I have no use for most of it, I didn't want to see it go to scrap. I have sold the 14hp tractor, with a Chrysler ignition that I adapted to it, plus all of the accessories, to a local collector. I'm keeping the 10hp tractor, which Dad had bought new, to occasionally haul stuff around in a small trailer. It doesn't run yet, has no spark, so I might adapt another car ignition. A few years back, when I adapted that NOS mid-'70s Chrysler ignition that I had on a shelf (the NASCAR blue box of the day, woo hoo!) to the 14hp Tecumseh, the first time I hit the starter and spun the engine over with the plug out and grounded, I was rewarded with the sight of GREAT BIG BLUE SPARKS that I could have seen from ten feet away!

I'm still left with the two tillers to find homes for.  The Sears is too new to have any collector value, but hasn't much running time on it (tilled a small veg garden once a year) and got oil changes every few years. Its just a good tool, and when I get around to getting it running again it ought to be worth a hundred bucks, I guess. I'll also have to re-do a broken weld holding one tiller tine to the shaft. Anyway, it's pretty scruffy looking now, but a collector could make a nice historical restoration of it. Gimme $35 and it's yours.



 



#2 lrhredjb OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 09:27 AM

Just found the site. I recently picked up some old stuff that belonged to my late dad:  two Sears Suburban tractors from the mid-'60s (flat rear fenders), one with original HH100 Tecumseh, and one that I'd guess had been re-engine (this site is correcting my spelling when it should not; the last word needs a d on the end to be past-tense) with an OH140 Tecumseh by the original owner. Also, a bunch of implements. And I picked up Dad's walk-behind Sears rototiller from the mid-'70s, and a very old Roto-Hoe tiller.  I used to keep all this stuff running and repaired, and though I have no use for most of it, I didn't want to see it go to scrap. I have sold the 14hp tractor, with a Chrysler ignition that I adapted to it, plus all of the accessories, to a local collector. I'm keeping the 10hp tractor, which Dad had bought new, to occasionally haul stuff around in a small trailer. It doesn't run yet, has no spark, so I might adapt another car ignition. A few years back, when I adapted that NOS mid-'70s Chrysler ignition that I had on a shelf (the NASCAR blue box of the day, woo hoo!) to the 14hp Tecumseh, the first time I hit the starter and spun the engine over with the plug out and grounded, I was rewarded with the sight of GREAT BIG BLUE SPARKS that I could have seen from ten feet away!

I'm still left with the two tillers to find homes for.  The Sears is too new to have any collector value, but hasn't much running time on it (tilled a small veg garden once a year) and got oil changes every few years. Its just a good tool, and when I get around to getting it running again it ought to be worth a hundred bucks, I guess. I'll also have to re-do a broken weld holding one tiller tine to the shaft. Anyway, it's pretty scruffy looking now, but a collector could make a nice historical restoration of it. Gimme $35 and it's yours.



 

Just curious, did you use the resistor in the coil circuit when you adapted the Mopar ignition?



#3 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 09:47 AM

(Second attempt. I hope this site isn't going to constantly be deleting and otherwise screwing with my posts. Of course, it could be Win 8.1, or my laptop, or me.)

I used an oil-filled automotive coil I had, and used the Mopar two-stage ballast resister of the mid-'70s, which has separate start and run circuits, and goes with the 5-pin Mopar box. There's a smart guy on the internet who has provided his scheme for replacing non-available Tecumseh ignitions, and I used his trigger.

#4 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 09:55 AM

The site is not providing me with an EDIT option so I can fix my first post.

In the last paragraph, I meant to say that the Roto-Hoe, which appears to be a Model 148H, early '50s with a rope-start Lauson RSH engine, about 2hp, is the one that is scruffy and needs me to weld the tine. But it is complete and original. I might be able to get it to run without disassembly other than detailing the carb and cleaning the fuel tank. But I'd feel better about it if there were NOS head gaskets and ring sets available. I need someone to give it a good home .  .  .  .

 


Edited by seattle smitty, July 20, 2015 - 09:57 AM.


#5 lrhredjb OFFLINE  

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Posted July 20, 2015 - 01:03 PM

When I was living in NE Ohio as a youngster I recall my dad had a Roto Hoe with a mower attachment that could be swapped out for the tiller head and yes, it was a Lauson engine.



#6 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 10:36 AM

My dad had the mower attachment, too, unfortunately gone now. I did a lot of lawn mowing with that combination. If you remember, there was no discharge chute in the mower deck, so the clippings got thrown out all sides. But you could adjust the blade height, and mow grass that had gotten quite tall  .  .  . This was all in the middle 1950s.


Edited by seattle smitty, July 21, 2015 - 10:37 AM.


#7 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted July 21, 2015 - 11:12 AM

There's a smart guy on the internet who has provided his scheme for replacing non-available Tecumseh ignitions, and I used his trigger.

 

 

Ed Stoller?



#8 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2015 - 11:08 AM

Yes, I should have remembered.



#9 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2015 - 11:27 AM

If anybody wants to try my idea of a Chrysler or other induction-type automotive ignition (which might be no better than going with Ed Stoller's complete system), first, you don't have to find an old Chrysler system; that's just what I happened to have on the shelf. I like adapting old cast-off stuff and making something cheap that also works well. But Standard Motor Products sells their very reliable version of the later and simpler Chrysler 4-pin ignition cheap enough (roughly $45 online) that you might decide it's best to just go with the new components. You could also use the Ford DuraSpark 2 box, though it usually a few more wires to figure out, or the module out of a GM HEI. They all have the same basic connections to make, and no doubt there are several internet articles telling about this, after which you can figure out the details as I did.



#10 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted July 22, 2015 - 11:59 AM

If anybody wants to try my idea of a Chrysler or other induction-type automotive ignition (which might be no better than going with Ed Stoller's complete system), first, you don't have to find an old Chrysler system; that's just what I happened to have on the shelf. I like adapting old cast-off stuff and making something cheap that also works well. But Standard Motor Products sells their very reliable version of the later and simpler Chrysler 4-pin ignition cheap enough (roughly $45 online) that you might decide it's best to just go with the new components. You could also use the Ford DuraSpark 2 box, though it usually a few more wires to figure out, or the module out of a GM HEI. They all have the same basic connections to make, and no doubt there are several internet articles telling about this, after which you can figure out the details as I did.

 

Ed describes them pretty well. Brian on garden tractor pulling tips.com has all the wiring diagrams for all the setups you mentioned.

I will be modifying my old SSI module to use as the pickup using a Chrysler module and coil, hoping to keep costs below $60. Someone on here earlier this year showed they used a Dodge ABS sensor as pickup.

Click on the link in my sig and check out the system my buddy built for my Tecumseh ignition. Little more $$$, but works well.



#11 seattle smitty OFFLINE  

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Posted July 23, 2015 - 10:49 AM

I doubt i'll ever do another ignition like that one for the Tecumseh OH140, which was on the tractor I sold. But I do have to get around to puzzling out why (last time I tried, which was a couple of year ago) the magneto-and-points system on the older HH100 flathead (has the belt-driven generator/starter) wasn't making sparks. I would have checked the grounds, the points, and the connections at either end of the sparkplug lead, It has an old-fashioned points-type regulator that might have something to do with it, though I think I did clean the points in that. I think I have the resistance specs for the coil. Well, I'll figure it out, I guess.


Edited by seattle smitty, July 23, 2015 - 10:55 AM.





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