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Hand Held Grinder Safety


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34 replies to this topic

#16 dstaggs OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 08:18 PM

Sure Proud it didn't happen to me as I have pulled all the things that have been said.( LUCKY) Now will will think twice before I pull these tricks again. Thanks

#17 Fabman OFFLINE  

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Posted March 06, 2012 - 01:39 AM

The 4 1/2 and 9 inch grinders are 2 of the most dangerous tools you can get a hold of. With 40yrs. of experience with these guys and all the safety measures i still got bit a couple of times. Never trust em they still can get ya.

#18 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 01:34 PM

Can't add much to this, except to say I'm carrying the scar(lower lip to jaw) from getting too familiar with grinders.
In another career I did metal finishing in factory on farm machinery prior to paint.
Caught an 8" sanding disk 80 grit(Ingersol pnumatic grinder) under a scale mount on a grinder mixer.
Jumped back hit me in the face, body smacked me in the jaw and the disc tangled in my shirt and stopped.
It could have easily cut my throat?
My only explaination is familiarity with a tool can lead to recklessness. I thought I had mastered the beast.
But it showed me!

#19 olcowhand OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 01:45 PM

Yep,they sure can hurt you in a hurry! Especially the larger diameters. You put an 8 or 9" grinder to 9,000rpm, and you have some serious momentum that is just itching to get hold of YOU! I had to post to this one, as I just got done using a 4 1/2" grinder myself. I know sometimes due to where you are grinding, the handle must come off, but if at all possible, always use the side handles. I set on them with an iron grip, especially in tight quarters. If you have good arm/grip strength & use it, then a 4 1/2" grinder can rarely bite you. But a large diameter grinder wheel can get you bad no matter what kind of strength you have! Besides, grip isn't a factor if you break the wheel or sanding disc as JDDannels said.

#20 Kurtee OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 05:21 PM

This a great post. It gets people talking about a very important subject. I personally have abused grinding wheels and had them let go. Personal injury was negligible for me. Little stinging and light bloodshed was all I got, but have seen the damage they can inflict on others. I will not use a 9" grinding wheel for anything. It is too hard to control. The posting about not standing in water when operating power tools is very relevant. We all know that this is not always possible. That is why there are GFI outlets. In the shop where I work I had all the outlets changed to be ground fault protected. If you don't have GFI's in your shop and can't afford to change them out at least get a portable one to use when you need more protection. The other option in some cases is to use cordless tools. Just my thoughts.

KURTEE
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#21 ducky OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 06:29 PM

So true Dan. I have taught fork lift safety and understand that very well. Thanks for the reminder. We all need that from time to time.

#22 chris m OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 07:23 PM

I know this topic well! I was working 12 hours on 3rd shift and Fabricating metal tables for the production floor at work, had a ton of them to make and the pressure was on to get it done.Well it was the end of the shift and I was rushing, I had a 36 grit disk on my 4 1/2" grinder, the piece I was grinding was in the vise. The disk hung up on a over cut on the angle iron I was grinding, It ripped the grinder out of my hands and slammed me in the face like some one hit me with a bat! Anyway, it split from below my lip up my jaw, it required stiches from inside my mouth and outside. I was tired and I was rushing! I wasn't wearing my safety shield just safety glasses. I use a grinder all the time and I knew better! Moral of the story Don't rush and always were a FULL face shield when grinding! ( I do now) The other thing I shouldn't have been using a 36 grit disk, but I was rushing and they remove allot of material fast.
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#23 trowel OFFLINE  

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Posted March 07, 2012 - 08:25 PM

A 9 inch with a twisted wire wheel in the chest, shirt stopped it, still have the scars, every now and again i will get a defective cutting disk and it will explode as soon as i start it up, hurts like hell, always start it with the blade facing in a safe direction.
You guys have got it covered pretty well, not much left to say but be safe.
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#24 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 09, 2012 - 03:37 PM

I have one as well ( 4.5") and I have a great deal of respect for it. I never use it without eye protection. The biggest hazards I find in general are working when you are really tired and should have stopped an hour ago and being in a hurry to get a job done. I also have observed that the pros who use power tools all day are often the ones that do unsafe things and don't wear protective equipment. It seems to be some sort of professional apathy. It's getting harder to do that these days with safety legislation and standards for job sites. Myself I have not given myself a serious injury with a power tool. I have done some damage with hand tools though. Drove a 1/2" chisel into my right palm just below the index finger. 8 stiches and I lost the feeling in 2 fingers for several months before it luckily came back. I was hurrying and tired at the time it happened. I got off easy on that one!!

#25 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 10, 2012 - 07:12 AM

I must mention,and hope it hasn't already been brought up,that those little wires on the wires wheels have a habit of coming off the wheel and sticking into you.I always wear safety glasses when using them,and it's a good thing because I have had them stick into my face before.

#26 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted March 13, 2012 - 07:29 PM

I have one as well ( 4.5") and I have a great deal of respect for it. I never use it without eye protection. The biggest hazards I find in general are working when you are really tired and should have stopped an hour ago and being in a hurry to get a job done. I also have observed that the pros who use power tools all day are often the ones that do unsafe things and don't wear protective equipment. It seems to be some sort of professional apathy. It's getting harder to do that these days with safety legislation and standards for job sites. Myself I have not given myself a serious injury with a power tool. I have done some damage with hand tools though. Drove a 1/2" chisel into my right palm just below the index finger. 8 stiches and I lost the feeling in 2 fingers for several months before it luckily came back. I was hurrying and tired at the time it happened. I got off easy on that one!!


The pros get casual because they do it all day every day. It happens in every trade. We had an electrician killed here last year and somebody said they didn't understand how it happened because he was so experienced. That's exactly how it happened...a rookie wouldn't have made that mistake. We all get complacent about things we're around all the time, and we all make stupid mistakes. Legislation can't fix that.

What we do need is regular reminders. I love the "WorkSafe" ads my province has been running for the last couple of years because, even though the ads suck, they remind people that work is dangerous.
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#27 JDBrian OFFLINE  

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Posted March 14, 2012 - 07:20 AM

The pros get casual because they do it all day every day. It happens in every trade. We had an electrician killed here last year and somebody said they didn't understand how it happened because he was so experienced. That's exactly how it happened...a rookie wouldn't have made that mistake. We all get complacent about things we're around all the time, and we all make stupid mistakes. Legislation can't fix that.

What we do need is regular reminders. I love the "WorkSafe" ads my province has been running for the last couple of years because, even though the ads suck, they remind people that work is dangerous.


Where I work we have a safety program which accomplishes exactly what you are talking about. I try to keep safety in mind when I'm working outside of work as well. Being aware of the hazards and taking the proper steps to protect yourself should become the way you work. Unfortunately, it's all too easy to let other priorities displace safety as job 1.
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#28 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2012 - 06:29 AM

try to keep safety in mind when I'm working outside of work as well. Being aware of the hazards and taking the proper steps to protect yourself should become the way you work. Unfortunately, it's all too easy to let other priorities displace safety as job 1.




I couldn't have said it any better.

#29 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2012 - 06:45 AM

Where I work we have a safety program which accomplishes exactly what you are talking about. I try to keep safety in mind when I'm working outside of work as well. Being aware of the hazards and taking the proper steps to protect yourself should become the way you work. Unfortunately, it's all too easy to let other priorities displace safety as job 1.


Work outside of work can be far more of a challenge. At work the people around you are generally familiar with the hazards and required to wear proper safety equipment. Outside of work there are people who aren't wearing the proper equipment and aren't familiar with the hazards. There are children and pets. It's a far less controlled atmosphere.

For example, my mother in-law will walk in front of a tractor; try to hand you things when you are running a saw; "help" by holding a board up while you sawing, causing the blade to bind and the saw to kick back; and do a dozen other things to get in the way. Meanwhile she'll be wearing open-toed sandals, no glasses, etc.. Killing your mother in-law won't get you in the wife's good books, so you end up watching her more than what you are doing yourself.

#30 IHCubGuy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 15, 2012 - 06:34 PM

My dad and I both have a 6" Metabo industrial type grinder. They take a 6" wheel but they are in a compact frame like a standard 4 1/2". And when they grab a hold they keep going so you have to keep a tight grip on them. Back in the middle of november I was at the farm cleaning pieces for my MF 12H. I always wear a pair of goggles when working with a grinder. To me it's just common sense to have them on and I make sure they are on before I even pick up the grinder. Well the pair at the farm were scratched so bad I couldn't see outta them. I left them on until just about dark when I couldn't see the work piece anymore and took them off (and I know better than to do this). Well i had the paint respirator on as I had been painting and thought it was also good to use it while wire wheeling paint off. I put a grinding wheel on to smooth out a rough spot and I felt a piece of grinding hit me in the face. I blinked a few times and then didn't feel it. Assuming it had come out I continued on with cleaning and painting. After I was alll done I took the pesirator off and thats when it hit me. The piece of metal was still there or had scratched my eye. The respirator I had put on pretty tight and it had my cheek pulled down just enough that I couldn't feel the chip with it on. I left it go overnite thinking it was scratched and it would be good in the morning. WRONG!!!! The next morning I got up and it was still there and PAINFUL to boot! I thoughtat this point it was a piece in there floating around and I gave it the day to see if I could get it out. Well after waiting till about 530 that evening I decided that it was stuck and I needed to go to the ER. At this point I couldn't see to drive anymore as my eye was watering almost continually. Got to the ER and they checked it out and sure enough it was in there. They numbed my eye with solution and got it out. Once it was out they had to drill it to get the rust ring out as well. It wasn't really all that fun of an experience and it was definately a hard, expensive lesson learned. It definately reaffirmed my determination to make sure I ALWAYS have eye protection.

And when one is grinding metal with a grinding wheel one should also where ear protection and if you are cleaning off something like paint or rust I think that a mask that is acceptable to filter that type of dust should be worn as well.

One can NEVER be to safe and while it wasn't a grinder I have a scar on my left hand where a drill bit went across it when I was younger. That one required several stitches to fix up.

Edited by IHCubGuy, March 15, 2012 - 06:39 PM.





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