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Hand Held Grinder Safety


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#1 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 07:14 AM

Came across this video on You Tube, thought it was definitely worth sharing, I use a Hand Held Grinder a Lot, and must confess I have been Lazy at times about taking safety precautions but that tool is MUCH MORE Dangerous than most tools I use, I have to start respecting it a lot more....Please Share this Video with others

YouTube - Angle Grinders (2 of 4) - Graphic Content!

I recomend you viset this You Tube Channel and check out all the safety Videos, very Cool & helpful.
http://www.youtube.com/user/WorkSafeBC

Edited by DanO, April 04, 2011 - 11:12 AM.

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#2 JoshBrown OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 07:30 AM

I am guilty of doing just that I haven't had a guard on mine since it was new. I need to get a good face shield or put the guard back on. Thanks for the eye opening video!!!!

#3 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 07:47 AM

Great post. A lot of us are guilty of taking shortcuts just to get something done but it only takes a split second to change your life. I am guilty as well. Although I never removed the guard from my grinder unless it was absolutely necessary to get into a spot that required it. I finally got a new pair of safety glasses and have been really good about wearing them.

#4 DanO OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 08:07 AM

Before seeing this video , the only concern I ever realy had about using my grinder was where the Sparks Fly, making sure it wasn't aimed towards me or any flamable liquids or combustable materials. I use that tool a LOT!!! Many times holding it with one hand & the material with the other! I just can't believe how ignorant & unaware of it's capabilities for deadly force I have been all these years.
I don't think I will ever use my grinder again without remembering this short video. It most certainly has opened my eyes...I hope all you guys watch it and pass it on to others.

#5 daytime dave OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 09:24 AM

That was a great safety reminder. I seldom use my grinder, and would have to go look for it in several places. I honestly have no idea if it has a guard on it or not.

I tend to wear safety glasses everywhere when working with tools.

#6 Gtractor ONLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 09:25 AM

I have a big angle grinder that has a toggle switch for off/on so I just never know if its on when I plug it in. I marked which way is on but it kept wearing off so I put it upside down and hold onto it every time I plug it in. I just have to assume it is on. I finally engraved the case as to which way is on so it doesn't wear off now. It also has the metal case and it has enough power to wrap me up before I knew what happened! but it was free! :bash: Some day I'll not be paying attention and it will bite me.

#7 DGS345 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 09:44 AM

I don't use my grinder alot but I'm sure I will think about this video the next time I do.
Thank You for the safety reminder

#8 tractorgarden OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 10:53 AM

I must say that working in the emergency service I see my share of trauma, But It boils down to the (I am just going to do it this one time, It is not going to happen to me, That gets us in trouble) Thank you very much for the safety video, we do not need any more victims. Shawn [quote name='DanO']Came across this video on You Tube, thought it was definitely worth sharing, I use a Hand Held Grinder a Lot, and must confess I have been Lazy at times about taking safety precautions but that tool is MUCH MORE Dangerous that that most tools I use, I have to start respecting it a lot more.

#9 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 08:04 PM

Here's a tip a guy I know learned the hard way: Don't use a circular saw blade on a grinder. He lost the use two fingers (they sewed them back on, but they don't work) and his thumb doesn't bend right anymore. The truth is that he was lucky. It could have been much worse.

A little experience from what I saw when I was fixing grinders. A lot of it seems like common sense, but apparently not:

Likely the most common accidents are caused by plugging them in without holding them. If the switch is shorted, they tend to just start. Then they take off.

Be careful of the cord. A grinder with a cutting blade can cut the cord without shorting it and blowing the breaker. Then you get a shock.

Wear eye protection.

Don't grind around flammable materials.

If you grind conductive material (aluminum and copper are the worst) wear gloves. If the grindings short the switch out, you can get a pretty bad burn.

Always inspect the gear housing before use. If it's cracked, it can come apart and send shrapnel everywhere.

Don't lean on the grinder. Let the wheel do its work, forcing it can cause it to come apart.

Unplug the grinder before changing the wheel. It's way easier than trying to grow your fingers back.

Keep the guard on. If you can't do it with the guard on, you are using the wrong tool.

Wait for the grinder to stop while you are holding it in the working position. Don't set it down, don't wave it around, and don't put it by your leg to rest your arm.

Don't try to fix a grinder by spraying brake cleaner, WD40, or nail polish remover into the motor or switch.

Don't grind while laying/standing in a puddle.

If you do your own grinder repairs, loctite all of the screws and bolts when re-assembling.

Don't let your boss push you into doing anything dangerous. You can always get another boss, but fingers and toes are another matter.

#10 Billygoat OFFLINE  

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Posted April 05, 2011 - 09:51 AM

I raised three sons. They were using firearms and running chainsaws before I let them use a 4 1/2" grinder. They could plainly see what firearms and chainsaws were all about. Those little grinders are very unassuming and people don't seem to realize how much damage they can do. I still have nice scars on my hand and top of my arm above my wrist from a cut-off wheel blowing up. Some of the wheel went through my glove to get my hand, and a lot more went through my shirt sleeve to get my arm. Still managed to remove the skin down to the meat. Another guy I know had one kick back on his face. The wheel didn't get him but the body of the grinder laid his face wide open. Had over 150 stiches and his face was still a mess. One just can't be too carefull with power tools.

#11 WQDL753 OFFLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2011 - 02:08 AM

I might as well pipe in on this one...
The graphic in the video was low key, a lot worse could have happened.
It's not just having the wrong wheel or no guard or even trying to force the work, but even the slightest bind can cause a wheel to come apart!
Another thing, even though the retaining nut on your arbor is threaded on so that it will try to tighten under load, it can come loose on the decell!!!
I've had it happen, if the inertia of the wheel overcomes the resistance in the gearhead it will come right off!!!
The funniest time it happened I already had a good habit of not being in line of a rotating tool on startup or shutdown, I had over greased the head and was useing a 4" wheel on a 27,000 rpm grinder. When I let off the trigger, it hovered in front of me long enugh for me to holler "LOOK OUT!" It took off across the floor about 60' to the office door, removed the paint while throwing sparks as it climed 2 or 3 feet up the door and landed about halfway back to me.
Since then I only use arbors that have the nut on the collet side so that if it does come loose it can't go anywhere.

And I must :ditto: one of the lines from the good Rev. "don't relax untill the tool comes to a compleat stop" ok, not a direct quote, but if you want to know why, just ask about this fun little adventure....
DSC00831.jpg

#12 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2011 - 04:39 AM

I use a hand held grinder everyday in my work ,and have been for probably 30 years and not once have I ever had a safety problem with it.I will say that I was injured with a bench grinder once,an as some of you may remember me saying ,I got my hand caught up and wrapped around a drill press chuck,breaking my thumb,causing tendon damage,and breaking bones in my hand and wrist.I have always tried to be very careful around equipment like that,but accidents to happen now and then.One thing I do now with the drill press that I never used to do is use a bolt down vise for holding certain parts to be drilled when ever I can.I also never wear gloves when using the drill press either.Be safety concious all the time,there is only one you.

#13 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2011 - 06:50 AM

You guys have covered this subject pretty well. I have just one thing to add: Never use a grinding or cutting wheel that has been dropped. Even if there isn't any visible damage, there could be a minuscule crack. At tens of thousands of RPMs that's all it takes! Always inspect the wheel before using it as well. If it has a chip out of the edge or a crack, THROW IT AWAY! I know that they're not cheap, but neither is your life. Along the same lines, if you drop the grinder with the wheel on it while putting it away, take the time to take the wheel off and throw it away BEFORE you store it. The next user (even if it's you) may not check it before use. I know I said one thing, but they're all related LOL.
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#14 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 09, 2011 - 07:27 AM

You guys have covered this subject pretty well. I have just one thing to add: Never use a grinding or cutting wheel that has been dropped. Even if there isn't any visible damage, there could be a minuscule crack. At tens of thousands of RPMs that's all it takes! Always inspect the wheel before using it as well. If it has a chip out of the edge or a crack, THROW IT AWAY! I know that they're not cheap, but neither is your life. Along the same lines, if you drop the grinder with the wheel on it while putting it away, take the time to take the wheel off and throw it away BEFORE you store it. The next user (even if it's you) may not check it before use. I know I said one thing, but they're all related LOL.



That is a very good point Steve.

#15 Goltz OFFLINE  

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Posted March 05, 2012 - 05:34 AM

Horror!!!




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