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#1 susanranadreyer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 09:23 AM

I am new at this and growing tomatoes any advice would be appreciated thanks
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#2 boyscout862 ONLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 09:52 AM

Feed them, water them, and support them. Don't let them be very wet. If you use cages, set them up when the plants are small or you will break branches when putting the cages on them. I like to mulch around the plants to cut down on weeds. In a pinch, old newspapers will even work for mulch. Good Luck, Rick


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#3 cootertom OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 09:54 AM

Feed them, water them, and support them. Don't let them be very wet. If you use cages, set them up when the plants are small or you will break branches when putting the cages on them. I like to mulch around the plants to cut down on weeds. In a pinch, old newspapers will even work for mulch. Good Luck, Rick

I shred all the junk mail and use it as mulch.


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#4 dthomp17 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 09:57 AM

I don't claim to be an expert by any means but this is what I do and I've had reasonable success.  They need at least a half a day of full sun, In Georgia you need to add lime to prevent blossom end rot.  I always start mine from plants and usually plant them as deep as the first branch and leaves. They need about an inch of water once a week.  I fertilize with 10 10 10 at a rate of about one teaspoon full around each plant initially when planted and again about a month later.  They need to be staked and tied to keep the limbs and fruit off the ground as they grow.  Hope that's a little help.

 

Good luck, Don


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#5 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 11:18 AM

If dealing with end rot, a little bone meal when you plant them will help.
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#6 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 11:19 AM

Mulching also helps keep away virus diseases that are spread by dirt splashed on leaves during rain. One more; mulch keeps moisture more even. Alternating wet and dry periods cause fruit to crack.


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#7 jd.rasentrac ONLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 11:56 AM

Try watering them this way: we dig a flower pot in the ground, near the roots. So you only bring water to the roots and not to the leaves. This is helpful against mildew aso 

k-DSCN0491.JPG

 

Sorry, I forgot: :welcometogttalk:


Edited by jd.rasentrac, June 30, 2015 - 11:58 AM.

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#8 Lmiller3358 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 12:02 PM

Try watering them this way: we dig a flower pot in the ground, near the roots. So you only bring water to the roots and not to the leaves. This is helpful against mildew aso 

attachicon.gifk-DSCN0491.JPG

 

Sorry, I forgot: :welcometogttalk:

That's what i was always taught too, water the roots,,,,my grand father always used water from the rain barrel, he said cold well water can actually shock the plant !!!


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#9 skyrydr2 ONLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 03:44 PM

Plastic mulch with drip irrigation under it is the only way I do it. The tomatoes love the warmth from the mulch and it keeps their leaves away from dirt pests. And if you a chemist by sorts, you can feed them a "tea" with a garden hose feeder tailored just for them. And it's all natural too. I make mine from creek water and different compost richened with different ingredients, like say egg shells and coffee grounds, or chicky poo and maple leaves, this is then mixed up with water and left to brew.... Evil Laugh inserted here...
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#10 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 04:01 PM

What everyone has said is spot on in my book. There are two types of growth habit in tomatoes, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate tends to set fruit once and it all ripens at about the same time. Plants get to a set size, tend to stay put, and when they are done fruiting, they are done. "Celebrity" is an example of these. The others are the ramblers of the family and require strong staking or caging. They will set fruit as long as the weather holds and continue to produce almost forever in my experience. Most of the heirloom varieties like "beefsteak" are of this type. Then there are the little guys you grow in pots on the back step, like Sweet 100, Sweet Chelsea, Sweet Million etc. They tend to climb like crazy and produce literally hundreds of tasty bite sized treats in clusters almost like grapes, all season long. Yeah, I'm pretty fond of tomatoes, lol. Welcome to the forum!!
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#11 susanranadreyer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 05:05 PM

What everyone has said is spot on in my book. There are two types of growth habit in tomatoes, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate tends to set fruit once and it all ripens at about the same time. Plants get to a set size, tend to stay put, and when they are done fruiting, they are done. "Celebrity" is an example of these. The others are the ramblers of the family and require strong staking or caging. They will set fruit as long as the weather holds and continue to produce almost forever in my experience. Most of the heirloom varieties like "beefsteak" are of this type. Then there are the little guys you grow in pots on the back step, like Sweet 100, Sweet Chelsea, Sweet Million etc. They tend to climb like crazy and produce literally hundreds of tasty bite sized treats in clusters almost like grapes, all season long. Yeah, I'm pretty fond of tomatoes, lol. Welcome to the forum!!

Thanks for the advice I find this new love of mine fascinating these are a couple plants that I already have. Have a blessed dayuploadfromtaptalk1435701787906.jpg uploadfromtaptalk1435701856380.jpg
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#12 susanranadreyer OFFLINE  

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Posted June 30, 2015 - 05:09 PM

That's what i was always taught too, water the roots,,,,my grand father always used water from the rain barrel, he said cold well water can actually shock the plant !!!

Thanks for the advice be blessed
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#13 susanranadreyer OFFLINE  

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Posted July 01, 2015 - 08:27 AM

Thanks for all the great tips. One problem I am having is they have grown about 8' tall so now what so I do the stick that supports them is 8' tall so now there bigger than the post. Any advice

#14 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted July 01, 2015 - 11:59 AM

Trim them so they bush?

#15 jd.rasentrac ONLINE  

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Posted July 01, 2015 - 01:38 PM

What everyone has said is spot on in my book. There are two types of growth habit in tomatoes, determinate and indeterminate. Determinate tends to set fruit once and it all ripens at about the same time. Plants get to a set size, tend to stay put, and when they are done fruiting, they are done. "Celebrity" is an example of these. The others are the ramblers of the family and require strong staking or caging. They will set fruit as long as the weather holds and continue to produce almost forever in my experience. Most of the heirloom varieties like "beefsteak" are of this type. Then there are the little guys you grow in pots on the back step, like Sweet 100, Sweet Chelsea, Sweet Million etc. They tend to climb like crazy and produce literally hundreds of tasty bite sized treats in clusters almost like grapes, all season long. Yeah, I'm pretty fond of tomatoes, lol. Welcome to the forum!!

 

Wow Lorna, sounds like a dissertation :wave: :smilewink: :thumbs: I normally eat the tomatoes and Doris does all the work :love:

edit: and when we have enough fruits on the bush, we reduce the blossom. So the bush gets stronger...


Edited by jd.rasentrac, July 01, 2015 - 01:40 PM.

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