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Who knows sweet potatoes?


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#1 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 08:22 AM

So I love sweet potatoes, never gorwn them. Wifey bought 12 small vines and "we" i.e me, threw them in the ground. Talking to my BIL, he said we won't get any taters this year, but should have a nice crop next year.

I have no clue, will these produce this year or does it take a year to get started then wait until next year. Are they anything like regular spuds as far as growing and harvesting?


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#2 cootertom OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 08:43 AM

Depends on when you planted them. They grow about like a regular potato but mature later.


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#3 Alc OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 10:49 AM

I've planted them for the past 5 years or so . They take a long time to grow , what kind did you get ? I've tried different one but Beauregard seems to do best for me so that's the only variety that I will plant . They are pretty easy to grow and the bugs don't seem to bother them , I did have problems on year where the vines looked great but the potatoes were very skinny , I might have use too much fertilizer  with nitrogen    5-10-10 is what I've read  they want  . I think that year I used Miracle-Grow which is  24-8-16 :wallbanging:  :wallbanging:

 

You wait until the vines die off then dig them up like regular potatoes ( that what I do ) you don't want them in the ground too long after that because they will start to rot if the grounds wet ,    then they want them cured but I just put them in the basement .  


Edited by Alc, June 26, 2015 - 10:52 AM.

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#4 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 11:57 AM

Planted them like June 2 or 3rd.

Not sure what kind they are or I should say, don't remember. I want to say they are a whiter skin not as orange.


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#5 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 12:59 PM

I bought some locally grown last winter in S. Virginia. They weren't much to look at compared to supermarket ones. They sort of had a russet skin, rough. But they were darker orange inside and great flavor.


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#6 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 07:55 PM

We plant about 30 plants every year.  Always plant Beauregard as they seem to produce the best for us in our sandy area.  I make a big mounded row with a hoe and plant the sweet potato plant on top.  Makes them a lot easier to dig.  I also cut the vines back to around 3' or less so the energy goes into the potatoes and not the vines.  The veins will usually start to die off just before frost.  If frost doe get the vines get them cut off and dig the potatoes ASAP or they will go bad in a short time.  Do not clean them until your ready to eat them.  Let them open air dry a week or so if the ground is wet and s ticking to them a lot.  Store them in a cool place in a bag that air can circulate through..  An old onion sack works great. We finished last years crop in March of this year.

 

One year we had potatoes that would not go in a 3 lb coffee can..  Very irregular on the outside and hard to clean but tasted just as good.


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#7 Lauber1 OFFLINE  

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Posted June 26, 2015 - 09:15 PM

we plant them here all the time. You'll get tators, they just wont be huge ones. Make sure you don't let the vine root into the ground, because it will grow a tator at each place and make them harder to find and dig later. I plant them in a mound and 3 or 4 plants here will make us a bushel come fall. I know they don't rot in the ground because I've plowed up tators in spring before when starting the next yrs garden.


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#8 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2015 - 06:55 PM

Dug my sweet taters today, we are getting frost the last few days although vines are still green. Not bad for my first time. Ended up filling 5 gal bucket. 

Can the little ones be held over to use as seed in the spring? 

 

20151114_171212.jpg


Edited by TAHOE, November 14, 2015 - 06:55 PM.

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#9 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted November 14, 2015 - 11:01 PM

Those are beauties! We tried growing them twice but never got anything near as nice and fat as that. Ordered them from a seed catalogue and what came was a bunch of stem cuttings about 10 inches long. Saddest looking offering you ever saw, but they did grow and produce. As far as I know they come from cuttings, not tubers like regular potatoes do. As Lauber1 said, if the vines root, they will produce a tuber where they attach to the ground. However, nothing ventured, nothing gained---- try planting a couple of small ones and see what happens.
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#10 LilysDad OFFLINE  

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Posted November 15, 2015 - 07:50 AM

Oldedeere, were those 'slips' rooted when you got them?



#11 oldedeeres ONLINE  

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Posted November 15, 2015 - 02:24 PM

Only just barely, I mean they were SAD looking when they came. The directions said to soak them for a day and then put them in the ground, and we did, but I made a well around them and kept them well watered for quite a while until leaves started to grow.
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#12 TAHOE OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2015 - 07:56 AM

My daughter sliced up some of thee last night, threw them in a pan then fried in a little butter. Man, they were good. not super sweet like the orange ones, but not a potato flavor either, just in between. 

 

I think with a little brown sugar in the oven, Mmmmmm goood!!!!

 

I think these were the Beauregards.


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#13 chieffan OFFLINE  

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Posted November 18, 2015 - 04:55 PM

I tried something different this year.  As we have no place that is real cool to store them I read on the net that they can be warped in news paper and stored that way.  That is what we did.  If you have small ones, put them in a jar of water and they will vine out real nice like.  No taters, just nice looking vines.


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