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110 welder or?


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#1 thompson1600 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 03:54 PM

What welder do you use for working on, fabricating new parts for or making implements etc around the farm? I am looking for a new welder and wondering what everyone is using, that is not too expensive. Stick or Mig? I have 110 of course, could have 220, but would prefer the portability of staying with 110. What do you use? Thanks

#2 grnspot110 ONLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 04:35 PM

I have an 50+ year old Marquette 180 amp stick that I inherited for my heavier welding. A couple of years ago I found a slightly used 130 Lincoln 110V mig that I use for 3/16" & less (I sometimes cheat a little on that). I use CO2 with it, as recommended by the local muffler shop owner, where I buy my gas. ~~ grnspot

#3 MH81 ONLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 06:03 PM

My Dad bought a Lincoln Arc 225 when I was little, I found one several years ago for myself. They are 220v and pretty abuse proof.

Recently, I got the chance to run Caseguys mig... I'll let him weigh in on what model it is, but let me say IT'S SWEEEET!!!

#4 dryrun OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 06:58 PM

I use a Miller 125, with gas kit, and 80/20 mix gas. Like it real well, but still miss my Lincoln 225 DC machine.

#5 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 07:33 PM

I have a 40+ year old Forney stick welder. I got it free from an old friend of mine. I had to replace the capacitor and re-do some connections inside, but it's a real champ when it comes to smooth welds! It's a 220V model, but for stick welding, I wouldn't want it any other way! As MH81 pointed out, I also picked up a Lincoln MIG set-up last year. It's a model 180C, also a 220V model, however, Lincoln makes a slightly smaller version, the 140, that's a 120V input. I love the 180. (I haven't used the stick welder since I got it LOL) There are 2 different versions of the 140 (and all the others in that series for that matter). The "T" and the "C". These designate "T"apped or "C"ontinuous and have to do with the settings on the front of the welder. The tapped model has several pre-set selections for the heat and feed settings. The continuous model is infinitely variable within the same ranges. The tapped model 140 is a fine machine and generally sells for about $100 less than the "C" model of the same size. I put a link here so you can see one and it's specifications. I'm thinking that the price they show is quite a bit higher than it should be, so check out their suppliers list and go to your local Lincoln dealer and see what they can offer you. click here That's my $.02 and I hope it helps.

#6 Rickski OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 07:46 PM

I have a Lincoln Arc 225 for 1/8" or more and oxy/acetylene for anything thin and exhaust work. My son borrowed my little Miller flux core and I haven't seen it back. Then again, I haven't gone looking for it since I have most everything covered between stick and gas.

#7 olcowhand ONLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 07:50 PM

To do any heavy welding in a single pass will require a 220V machine, but for average homeowner style stuff, a 110V machine will get you by. I have 5 welders, from 85 amp wire, to 310 amp stick/TIG.

#8 thompson1600 OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 11:01 PM

What size circuit should a guy run for a 220V welder?

#9 caseguy OFFLINE  

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Posted March 31, 2011 - 11:11 PM

Naturally that depends on the welder, but there should be a plate or tag that says what the current requirements are. I have a dedicated 30 amp line that I share between my welders (one at a time LOL). Just be sure that whatever you go with, the wire is properly sized throughout the entire circuit. i.e.10 AWG for 30 amps etc. Another thing to be aware of is the current rating on any receptacle that you decide on. They are not all created equal, and be prepared for the sticker shock on the higher ratings! They can be $15 to $40 depending on the style.

#10 mjodrey OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 04:30 AM

Like Daniel,I have more than one , a 220V Miller 251 Mig, a 220V S.A.M. ( Smart Automated Machine ) Mig, used mostly for 16 to 22 gauge sheet metal,a stick welder,Oxy/acc. torches,and not a welder but I also have a Plasma Cutter,which is a very hard "tool".
I'm going to have myself a TIG one of these days.

Edited by mjodrey, April 01, 2011 - 04:58 AM.


#11 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 05:28 AM

I just have a Hobart 140 with flux cored wire. It has served me well so far. Been a couple times I wish I had a gas bottle on it too and will probably add it here soon. Right now though I have a NOS bottle on the back of it making it a hot rod welder LOL.

I would like to learn TIG someday.

#12 KennyP ONLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 06:14 AM

I have the Hobart 140, also. 80/20 gas, don't like the bbs on flux core. Does a good job for what I use it.
KennyP

#13 tractormike OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 06:18 AM

I have 3 welders in my shop depending on what I am working on. I have an old twenty century 220 volt/ 240 amp AC stick welder for real heavy welding. You can't beat it for welding on thick dirty pieces of steel. I have a 110 volt /140 amp Hobart wire feed mig welder set up to use either gas or gasless. I have had this welder about a year now and really like it. I leave it set up with solid wire and run mixed gas and it makes a very nice clean weld with hardly any spatter to clean up after running a bead. You do have to have fairly clean metal when using a wire feed. This welder has been may main machine when doing projects now. I also have an oxy-acetylene torch which I use mainly for cutting but also braze weld some with. When fixing pinholes or worn spots on thin tubing like hydraulic lines I will braze them.
When I lived on the farm we had an old Lincoln 220 volt/ 225 amp tombstone welder and it did all of our welding. We did have a carbon arc torch attachment for it that you could braze with but was mainly used for heating and straightening things.
Hard to recommend just one welder but if just starting out the old Lincoln 220volt 225 amp welders are fairly cheap especially if you can find one used. They are bullet proof and can do a wide range of welding/cutting.




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