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Post Hole Digger?


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#1 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2011 - 02:31 PM

I was not sure which section to put this question in. So moderator if you feel there is a better place feel free to move it.


Monday night the wife informed me, that she was spending a fortune buying Rasberries, Grapes and Strawberries each year(yeah I knew it but love berries so never complained). Now that we had room we are going to plant 2 - 30 ft rows of each kind she can find.
Well the Grapes and Rasberries would have to be trellised which means I'm going to have 20-30 post holes to dig this spring.
Since I have fence only along 1 side of my 8 acres(that need repair or replacement) there is likely to be a lot more holes needing dug.
I am considering investing in one of the 1 man gas powered diggers.
What do you reccomend and or use?

#2 DMF OFFLINE  

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Posted March 30, 2011 - 02:49 PM

I tried that once.... it was awful. I ended up digging a trench with a backhoe and filling in around the posts! My hay partner has one for his compact tractor. He raises miniature horses and has a few paddocks so I guess it works good for him...I've never tried it myself.

I guess it would all depend on the type of soil you have....

#3 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 12:22 AM

I use a towable two-wheeled model, JD. Mine's a homebuilt, but it's pretty much a direct rip-off...er, copy...of the ones the rental stores have. The guy who built it actually rented one and stole the design/specs.

They work on a hydraulic drive, which is beautiful because if it gets stuck you can usually put it in reverse to get it out of the hole. They don't pound you as badly if you hit a rock or root (they do still pound you a bit though). They are also pretty easy to wheel around (some models have hydraulic drive for the wheels too, but mine doesn't) and fit into pretty tight spaces. The motor acts as a counter balance when lifting out of the hole too, so they aren't that hard on your back. In the soil around here, and because I work in people's yards where space is often at a premium, it's the best I've found.

#4 NUTNDUN OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 05:32 AM

I would think that if you are only doing the post holes one time and not all the time you would be further off to rent a post hole digger. Could always rent a skid steer with the post hole attachment. Or I think the Ditch Witch things have post hole digger attachments too.

#5 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 11:03 AM

The skid steers are nice if you have the room to work. Transport can be expensive though...depends on your equipment and rental company. It can also be a pain to line up the auger on the hole if you are working alone and precision is required...not bad once you get used to it, but dicey for the first few holes. Still, once you're used to it, a skid steer is the ultimate way to dig post holes. A lot easier than any other method.

#6 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted April 01, 2011 - 08:19 PM

Yes it probably would be wiser to rent. My problem is I will be doing most of this in evenings and on saturdays.
I don't get back to town early enough to pick up a machine. Plus they run on bankers hours close at 2:oo Saturday afternoon.
Have no decisions made yet and this can wait a couple months. I can plant the berries and it will be a couple months before they will need trellising.

#7 Reverend Blair OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2011 - 02:31 PM

Princess Auto has a tractor-mounted PHD on for about $450 up here. Tractor Supply seems to carry a lot of the same stuff in the US. You need at least a cat 1 3pth and 540 rpm PTO though.

#8 hydriv OFFLINE  

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Posted April 03, 2011 - 04:18 PM

To each his own but my question is this. Why do you feel it necessary to use wood posts? These are berries, not watermelons or pumpkins.:smilewink::smilewink::smilewink:

It it was me, I'd just drive in steel T-bars and then wire whatever kind of trellis that I felt I needed to the T-bars. You could put trellis on both sides of the T-bars and then plant berries on both sides as long as you orient them east /west to so that one side does not shade out the other. There are several types of wire mesh that come in rolls plus there is also plastic lattice in 4 x 8 sheets.

You can either buy or rent a post driver to install the T-bars. If you have to move them later on, then T-bars are much easier to move and far faster to install. Just my opinion but I think that you are making this project far more expensive and work intensive than it needs to be. It's a veggie garden, not a flower garden. Cheap and fast are the two principles that I adhere to. The crops don't care if you gold-plate those posts.

#9 JD DANNELS OFFLINE  

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Posted April 04, 2011 - 09:53 PM

There is a place for steel posts in the garden or in a fence. But there are places where a 4x4 or 6x6 wood posts too. Since this will be there for 25 yrs plus I think 4x4 posts set 3 ft in the ground seem apropriate.




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